2021 Jerez MotoGP Qualifying Result: Someone’s Keen On A New Car

Looking at the lessons learned from practice, it seemed like pole position was only going one way: in Fabio Quartararo’s scorebook. The prophecy came true soon after, although the Frenchman did get some friendly fire from former teammate Franco Morbidelli, who initially got within five thousandths of a second of pole, until Quartararo extended his lead to a marginally more comfortable five hundredths of a second. After seeing his best FP3 time cancelled really late after the session, the Italian was the undisputed leader of Q1 and climbed all the way to second on the grid, while also giving us a phenomenal save at turn 13 in the process. Jack Miller benefitted from Morbidelli’s lap cancellation to take part in Q2 directly and made the best of it, joining the front row of the grid, only a tenth off pole.

Pecco Bagnaia towed his teammate around for the final run and eventually managed to follow him on the timesheets in fourth, ahead of Takaaki Nakagami and Johann Zarco, the Honda man infiltrating the Ducati duo on row two. After being right at the sharp end in practice, Maverick Viñales will be disappointed to find himself on the third row of the grid, three tenths slower that his teammate and sharing the grid with compatriots Aleix Espargaro and Alex Rins.

Joan Mir rounded out the top ten ahead of Q1 escapee Brad Binder and the second-best Honda of test rider Stefan Bradl, the trio composing fourth row. The Repsol Honda duo of Pol Espargaro and Marc Marquez start from row five, after their respective crashes at turn 7 earlier today derailed their weekend but Marquez was still busy putting on a show with a couple of saves in Q1. They will be joined on the fifth row by top rookie Enea Bastianini. 

Results:

Pos No. Rider Bike Time Diff Prev
1 20 Fabio Quartararo Yamaha 1'36.755    
2 21 Franco Morbidelli Yamaha 1'36.812 0.057 0.057
3 43 Jack Miller Ducati 1'36.860 0.105 0.048
4 63 Francesco Bagnaia Ducati 1'36.960 0.205 0.100
5 30 Takaaki Nakagami Honda 1'37.008 0.253 0.048
6 5 Johann Zarco Ducati 1'37.054 0.299 0.046
7 12 Maverick Viñales Yamaha 1'37.070 0.315 0.016
8 41 Aleix Espargaro Aprilia 1'37.085 0.330 0.015
9 42 Alex Rins Suzuki 1'37.124 0.369 0.039
10 36 Joan Mir Suzuki 1'37.154 0.399 0.030
11 33 Brad Binder KTM 1'37.467 0.712 0.313
12 6 Stefan Bradl Honda 1'37.502 0.747 0.035
    Q1 Results:        
Q2 21 Franco Morbidelli Yamaha 1'36.916    
Q2 33 Brad Binder KTM 1'37.350 0.434 0.434
13 44 Pol Espargaro Honda 1'37.407 0.491 0.057
14 93 Marc Marquez Honda 1'37.489 0.573 0.082
15 23 Enea Bastianini Ducati 1'37.675 0.759 0.186
16 88 Miguel Oliveira KTM 1'37.746 0.830 0.071
17 46 Valentino Rossi Yamaha 1'37.915 0.999 0.169
18 10 Luca Marini Ducati 1'37.925 1.009 0.010
19 9 Danilo Petrucci KTM 1'38.065 1.149 0.140
20 73 Alex Marquez Honda 1'38.069 1.153 0.004
21 27 Iker Lecuona KTM 1'38.139 1.223 0.070
22 32 Lorenzo Savadori Aprilia 1'38.325 1.409 0.186
23 53 Tito Rabat Ducati 1'38.641 1.725 0.316
Round Number: 
4
2021
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Comments

It's mystifying and marvellous how the times in GP and moto 2 can be so close. Q2 field within one second. Are these mere mortals, or some kinda automan programed with digital feedback? Back in the day one or two seconds off the pace was cause for optimism, now .2-.3 seconds off is cause for dispair. For a fan it's all good, close racing, result in doubt untill the checkered flag!

.....crash! The 'fight', mentally, is something few people will ever understand.