2014 Valencia MotoGP Wednesday Final Test Times: Marquez Leads Close Top 6

Marc Marquez has ended the final day of testing at Valencia on top of the timesheets, and leaves for the winter as the fastest overall. The Repsol Honda rider spent most of the day trying the 2015 prototype RC213V, but jumped back on the 2014 bike at the end of the day to set the fastest lap. He ended a tenth quicker than his Honda teammate Dani Pedrosa, and two tenths quicker than Yamaha man Jorge Lorenzo.

Lorenzo led an entire gaggle of Yamahas, the Movistar Yamaha rider ending ahead of Monster Tech 3's Pol Espargaro, factory man Valentino Rossi, and Espargaro's satellite teammate Bradley Smith. 

Danilo Petrucci caused a surprise, ending the day in 7th, ahead of the satellite Hondas and as fastest of the Pramac Ducatis. Petrucci was a tenth quicker than Cal Crutchlow, who spent the day looking for rear grip from the LCR Honda. Yonny Hernandez was 9th on the second Pramac Ducati, ending the day just ahead of Aleix Espargaro, who was exactly 1 second behind Marc Marquez. Suzuki's test debut was generally acclaimed a success, with both riders heaping praise on the handling of the bike.

Times from Wednesday are below, the overall best times of the test appear below that.

Wednesday times:

Pos No Rider Bike Time Diff Prev
1 93 Marc Marquez Honda RC213V 1:30.973    
2 26 Dani Pedrosa Honda RC213V 1:31.119 0.146 0.146
3 99 Jorge Lorenzo Yamaha M1 1:31.164 0.191 0.045
4 44 Pol Espargaro Yamaha M1 1:31.288 0.315 0.124
5 46 Valentino Rossi Yamaha M1 1:31.301 0.328 0.013
6 38 Bradley Smith Yamaha M1 1:31.365 0.392 0.064
7 9 Danilo Petrucci Ducati GP14 1:31.665 0.692 0.300
8 35 Cal Crutchlow Honda RC213V 1:31.774 0.801 0.109
9 68 Yonny Hernandez Ducati GP14.2 1:31.914 0.941 0.140
10 41 Aleix Espargaro Suzuki GSX-RR 1:31.973 1.000 0.059
11 8 Hector Barbera Ducati Open 1:32.007 1.034 0.034
12 51 Michelle Pirro Ducati GP14.2 1:32.113 1.140 0.106
13 69 Nicky Hayden Honda RC213V-RS 1:32.173 1.200 0.060
14 45 Scott Redding Honda RC213V 1:32.621 1.648 0.448
15 6 Stefan Bradl Forward Yamaha 1:32.784 1.811 0.163
16 19 Alvaro Bautista Aprilia 1:32.810 1.837 0.026
17 63 Mike Di Meglio Ducati Open 1:32.922 1.949 0.112
18 25 Maverick Viñales Suzuki GSX-RR 1:33.216 2.243 0.294
19 76 Loris Baz Forward Yamaha 1:33.486 2.513 0.270
20 50 Eugene Laverty Honda RCV1000R 1:33.509 2.536 0.023
21 43 Jack Miller Honda RCV1000R 1:33.746 2.773 0.237
22 33 Marco Melandri Aprilia 1:34.336 3.363 0.590

 

Overall times over all three days:

Pos No Rider Bike Time Diff Prev Day
1 93 Marc Marquez Honda RC213V 1:30.973     Wed
2 99 Jorge Lorenzo Yamaha M1 1:30.975 0.002 0.002 Mon
3 44 Pol Espargaro Yamaha M1 1:31.118 0.145 0.143 Mon
4 26 Dani Pedrosa Honda RC213V 1:31.119 0.146 0.001 Wed
5 38 Bradley Smith Yamaha M1 1:31.204 0.231 0.085 Mon
6 46 Valentino Rossi Yamaha M1 1:31.250 0.277 0.046 Mon
7 29 Andrea Iannone Ducati GP14.2 1:31.465 0.492 0.215 Mon
8 5 Andrea Dovizioso Ducati GP14.2 1:31.644 0.671 0.179 Mon
9 9 Danilo Petrucci Ducati GP14 1:31.665 0.692 0.021 Wed
10 35 Cal Crutchlow Honda RC213V 1:31.774 0.801 0.109 Wed
11 68 Yonny Hernandez Ducati GP14.2 1:31.914 0.941 0.140 Wed
12 41 Aleix Espargaro Suzuki GSX-RR 1:31.973 1.000 0.059 Wed
13 8 Hector Barbera Ducati Open 1:32.007 1.034 0.034 Mon
14 51 Michelle Pirro Ducati GP14.2 1:32.054 1.081 0.047 Mon
15 69 Nicky Hayden Honda RC213V-RS 1:32.173 1.200 0.119 Wed
16 6 Stefan Bradl Forward Yamaha 1:32.209 1.236 0.036 Mon
17 45 Scott Redding Honda RC213V 1:32.621 1.648 0.412 Wed
18 19 Alvaro Bautista Aprilia 1:32.810 1.837 0.189 Wed
19 63 Mike Di Meglio Ducati Open 1:32.922 1.949 0.112 Wed
20 15 Alex De Angelis ART 1:33.132 2.159 0.210 Mon
21 25 Maverick Viñales Suzuki GSX-RR 1:33.216 2.243 0.084 Wed
22 17 Karel Abraham Honda RC213V-RS 1:33.446 2.473 0.230 Mon
23 76 Loris Baz Forward Yamaha 1:33.486 2.513 0.040 Wed
24 50 Eugene Laverty Honda RCV1000R 1:33.509 2.536 0.023 Wed
25 43 Jack Miller Honda RCV1000R 1:33.746 2.773 0.237 Wed
26 33 Marco Melandri Aprilia 1:34.336 3.363 0.590 Wed
27 66 Alex Hofmann Aprilia 1:35.646 4.673 1.310 Mon

 

2014
Tweet Button: 

Back to top

Comments

Aliex was 1 second behind Marquez in 2011 Rossi was 1.5 seconds behind Pedrosa ! I am seriously impressed. Suzuki is in with a chance. Good work Randy!

On the other hand MM33 is looking rather sad, over half a second slower than the rookies rookie Miller. it's not just the bike Bautisa was nearly a second faster than Miller. Having said that the Aprilia clearly needs some work. I hope they can do it.

Christmas has come early for me, courtesy of Aleix's times on the Suzuki. Let's hope it can challenge the top satellites, and dare I say it, the top factory bikes!

The Aprillias need some work, but I have faith in them getting up to speed quickly. Aleix's times may be more Aleix and less Suzuki...

On a sidenote David, I wrote an article about the economics of entry level racing (http://wp.me/p5gIrg-r), inspired by yours (http://bit.ly/1u2ILN8) about MotoGP. Let me know what you think!

Don't accept as a given that racing functions like mercantile competition. It leads to paradoxical conclusions, like spec racing (low-grade communism) and series-sanctioned-monopoly are ways to reduce costs in the long run. In fact, neither method is effective for reducing costs, unless you foil them against the self-destruction of mercantile competition.

When manufacturers and riders hoard championships, the championships become less and less valuable, not only according to the inductive reasoning (subject value theory), but also empirically as fans find other venues for sporting entertainment. The key is to eliminate the mercantile competitive environment by creating something that more closely resembles a functional market.

Remember that market-based economies still struggle with mercantile influence because companies often vie for market share, particularly Japanese companies, which reintroduces competition for a finite resource. Governments have established rules for breaking trusts and monopolies. Sanctioning bodies cannot break-up the factory racing teams nor change the ownership structure, and this regulatory limitation is the source of racing's economic woes. Ironically, anti-monopoly regulations actually put MotoGP in its current fix, when European courts forced CVC, F1 commercial rights holder, to sell its interest in MotoGP, prior to the economic meltdown.

Traditional sports have already solved a lion's share of the economic problems associated with mercantilism. For instance, many leagues have salary caps and draft lotteries to introduce competition. They operate seamlessly, and fans accept them as part of the drama of competition (usually). The teams also have a profit motive beyond winning, since they are entitled to large pieces of the TV revenue and ticket sales. Racing has never come close to solving its problems, and most of the methods for sustaining competition are often summarily dismissed by fans. That's why national and international racing series, like NASCAR or F1, still lag so far behind traditional sports.

Does anyone know if the following are correct for the 2015 season? If incorrect, please correct.

Yonny Hernandez: GP14.2
Danilo Petrucci: GP14.2
Hector Barbera: GP14
Mike di Meglio: GP14

Also, are Barbera and di Meglio running Factory or Open software (given that Ducati Factory bikes are allowed all the benefits of Open bikes PLUS Factory software)?

Your line up of GP14.2 vs. GP14 is correct, I am pretty sure. The Avintia GP14's will be Open, not Factory. That is for two reasons, I believe. One, to get a headstart on the spec software. Two, I think only two satellite Factory Option bikes are permitted, and those two slots are for the Pramac team.

Hiya Lew!

And just today, in confirming that Petrucci will ride Crutchlow's bike from this yr for 2015 it is identified as a "14.1" - what the heck is that?

I have no idea why Duc would not have as many bikes as possible be the 2015 iteration so it can get developed. Surely they can manage 4 of them!

14.2 looks like a good step for the Anintia bikes. Anyone understand this schtuff?

Just a guess, but I'd bet GP14.1 is a new name for the bike formerly known as GP14. So if it ain't a GP14.2 then it must be a GP14.1. Just a guess. I don't know why Petrucci would get one rather than the other, but surely it has to do with inventory on hand, I would think. And no interest in resuming manufacture of obsolete designs, I would think also.