FIM Press Release: Estrella Galicia 0,0 Protests Against Jack Miller Rejected

After the incidents between Jack Miller and Alex Marquez, and between Alex Marquez and Danny Kent, the Estrella Galicia 0,0 team protested the behavior of Miller and Kent to Race Direction. Race Direction held hearings with all riders concerned, reviewed the evidence, and rejected the protests. Today, the FIM issued a press release containing the official statement from Race Direction on the events:


FIM Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix
Shell Advance Malaysian Motorcycle Grand Prix - Decision of the Race Direction

Miller-Marquez

A protest by the Estrella Galicia 0,0 Team was received by Race Direction following the Moto3 race of the Shell Advance Malaysian Motorcycle Grand Prix. The protest is against rider #8 Jack Miller for non-sporting behavior. Specifically it is alleged that Miller intentionally made contact several times with rider #12 Alex Marquez with the intention of taking Marquez off his line, to make him lose positions or to make him crash.

A Race Direction hearing was held with both riders and a team representative from each in attendance, and both riders were interviewed about the incidents.

Having reviewed video evidence and the evidence from the riders it is the unanimous decision of Race Direction is that the incidents in question did not contravene the FIM Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix Regulations.

No further Race Direction action will be taken, therefore the protest is denied.

No appeal was lodged therefore the decision of Race Direction is final.

Kent-Marquez

A protest by the Estrella Galicia 0,0 Team was received by Race Direction following the Moto3 race of the Shell Advance Malaysian Motorcycle Grand Prix. The protest is against rider #52 Danny Kent for non-sporting behavior. Specifically it is alleged that Kent intentionally slowed down in Turn 6 knowing that rider #12 Alex Marquez was behind him, with the intention of slowing Marquez.

A Race Direction hearing was held with both riders and a team representative from each in attendance, and both riders were interviewed about the incidents.

Having reviewed video evidence, expert independent analysis of data logger evidence and the evidence from the riders it is the unanimous decision of Race Direction is that the incident in question did not contravene the FIM Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix Regulations.

No further Race Direction action will be taken, therefore the protest is denied.

No appeal was lodged therefore the decision of Race Direction is final.

Round Number: 
17
2014

Back to top

Comments

Absolutely Jack needs others to get involved but my meaning is more that others get involved to deliberately impede the chances of one or the other (just as the Mafiosi did to Hans Spaan all those years ago)

Seriously? After everything we've seen from Ducati you think Stoner had the better bike in 08? Put Rossi on that bike and he's nowhere at Laguna, period. He admitted he couldn't ride it like Stoner did. Having access to Casey's data was a big wake up call for he and Burgess when they arrived at Ducati. I'd love to have seen what Stoner could have achieved with the factory Yam. Put it this way the next best Ducati in the 08 title was 12 th, where 3 of the top 7 bikes were Yamaha.

For comparison 3 of the top 4 bikes in Moto3 this year are Hondas. So yeah I'd say it is similar to 08 in some ways, but Miller is replicating what Stoner did rather than Rossi

I do not say the better bike but the faster bike .............. there is a significant difference.

Stoner was blindingly fast on the 2008 Ducati at Laguna and had dominated the practices with seemingly large margins. He was in another zone throughout practice and this was expected to carry on into the race. He was also on a run of wins that was starting to get his championship back on track(a bit like Miller there I suppose) and many of the opposition of the day were already settling for lower places, thus was the dominance. .

What Rossi did was take the slower Yamaha and beat Stoner with outright race craft, fair or foul. The Yamaha was the better bike, but not the faster and that is what we are comparing to here.

Again as I have said, my point is about the manner of the racing and in that regard Miller did not ride a Stoner Laguna race but instead rode the Rossi style of placing the bike where it needed to be to directly impede the faster bike.

As for Stoner's performances on the Ducati, well they are well known as are the results that others achieved and if there is one thing that Stoner should be remembered for without the hatred he cops, it is what he achieved on that red bike as it was phenomenol in the wider scheme of things (2009/2010 particularly)

Stoner had marginally better race pace but not the margin some people believe. ROSSI and his crew made a bit of a break through in warm up and were less than half a second off Stoner. And when it came to close dicing the Ducati was a blunt tool compared to the Yam. If Stoner could run the ultra committed lines he needed to he was fast but the Ducati just wasnt capable of changing lines like the Yam. In essence I agree with the rest of what you say though

David said it best a couple of years back...

"After their legendary and heart-stopping duel at Laguna Seca, Rossi had felt he had the measure of the Australian, beating Stoner more often than not and taking the 2008 and 2009 titles. Once he realized that throughout that period, Stoner had been bringing a knife to a gunfight and still regularly beating him - even after the introduction of the spec tire - Rossi must have asked questions of his own ability."

http://www.motomatters.com/opinion/2012/04/17/between_the_devil_and_the_...

Miller (19) and Marquez (18) are just acting their age. Who among us had no temper, competitiveness, will to win at any cost at that age ? Boys will be boys...

....some of the comments here are not unlike the Crash.net fan-boys. Seriously did some of you guys watch the same race as me?

Miller was completely within the law with his moves....funny when it's Rossi duffing up Stoner @ Laguna it' s regarded as a classic.

I'm also extremely disappointed in Alex Marquez behaviour after the race. Both Alex and Marc should be careful throwing stones at glass houses. Marc in particular, he was no angel on his way to the Moto 2 title, nevermind his Lorenzo punting move in MotoGP.

Racing is racing, just get on with it and stop whinning will ya's!!? You never hear this sort of crying in Supersports classes and they are constantly beating each other up.

Hope Miller stuffs Marquez now.

I think MM was right about Miller.
MM never touched anybuddy, never torpedo anybuddy, never used a rider as a wall to make the corner, never clash with other riders in any class hes been in.!
So yes MM can speak free as hes 1 of the cleanest riders ever.
AM also never touched never rides hard and also never clash with anybuddy.
Wilairot,JL,VR,DP,AI, or any rider in MotoGP never had a clash with MM.

Now that we had a big laugh....

GO MILLER GET THAT TITLE

I like Miller, but in my opinion (and thats what we're here for right?) he was way out of line and all the moves looked completely intentional. Watch the race, whenever Marquez was on Miller's outside going into turn 1 Miller would run wide and hang him out to dry, BUT when Miller was by himself HE NEVER RAN WIDE in turn 1. That was all the proof i needed. I really like Miller and I'd love to see him take the championship, but his antics this race definitely put him in a new light for me anyway. I know some will say its just racing, and it is, but it just seemed to me Miller took every opportunity he could to push Marquez wide when he could have very easily held a tighter line.
Then again, Marquez played into it on an occasion making contact when he probably didn't have to, AND I didn't like Marquez's play in Aragon, so I guess fair is fair or something like that.

I'll admit that some of the moves seemed pretty hairy, but you have to check whether Miller made the apex. If Miller was able to get under Alex, push him wide, then come back and still hit an apex then Miller was just taking an alternative line through the corner. Jack can't rely on just winning races if he want to take the title, and with the poor speed of the KTM and the insane slipstreaming of moto3, there's no point trying to run away. Jack has to win races and make sure that Alex scores poorly, and the only way he can do that is get in his way at every chance and hope other riders can get between them.

completely agree... again, my thing is just on more than a few occasions it looked without a doubt that Miller had a tight line, realized Marquez was on his outside, and suddenly his line was much wider, and yes he then returned to the apex, but I think that only further proves my point, he didn't have to run wide but did to impede Marquez. Part of me thinks it's brilliant racecraft and speaks volumes of both riders for not binning it. Part of me thinks it was poor antics on Miller's part

I'm posting this again as I think it fits this thread better.

Miller raced tough but fair in my opinion.

He had the pace and braking skills to position himself in front of Marquez every time without any of the riders getting hurt or falling.

That's an acceptable racing strategy that we don't get to see at every race because normally your opponent would play a counter move or alternative line that would make you look silly a couple of laps later.

Miller's strategy worked because Marquez had his eyes on the title and couldn't bring himself to think out of the box and change his lines, breaking points etc.

Is therefore my opinion that the light contacts between the riders where the result of Marquez obstinacy in not wanting to change his strategy.

Cheers

In a block pass, you sacrifice speed through the turn for position on the track. Your opponent finds you sitting on the apex, and the fastest line for them is to follow you out of the corner.

Miller was frequently nowhere near an apex. He sacrificed speed AND track position to go after Marquez. And had Marquez changed his line and gone to the inside, Miller would have chopped off Marquez' front wheel.

Considerations of racing strategy are not applicable here, because this was not a race.

It was a hunt.

he sacrificed so much speed and so much track position, so many times, that he came within a whisker of winning the race.

It must be galling for Alex Marquez, his team and HRC to be beaten by the slower KTM of Miller at one of the fastest tracks of the year (two drag strip straights).

The leading group of riders were a lone KTM leading and a gaggle of Hondas (very much like Philip Island), with only Danny Kent's Husky surging back toward the end.

Miller's KTM was 29th, yes 29th slowest in the official speed trap.

Miller proved his racecraft at Philip Island and once again at Sepang, and is why HRC's Shuhei Nakamoto was so keen to sign Miller to HRC and MotoGP.

HRC know how much development they put into the 2014 NSF250R and to be beaten by the KTM with a 'man sized' rider in Miller must hurt.

Miller rode hard and aggressive as someone SHOULD when trying to stay alive in the championship. AT no time did he 'hunt' (what a ludicrous analysis) or try to knock off and at no time was it unfair.

Some of you should go back to watching Boat Racing where your sensibilities should be entertained to perfection.

I'm also not sure so many of you have actually raced motorbikes to appreciate what's happening. Let's look at some of the "incidents":

1) 13 laps to go: Miller brakes HARD into T1 from third back. Comes level with Marquez, set up on the inside and drives them both wide. Marquez goes wider and Miller makes up one place and Alex gets shuffled back to 5th. No contact was made.

2) 5 laps to go: Heading into T1, Miller sets up on the outside. Alex makes a gesture as if to bump Miller out wider, likely to get back at him for the first incident. It works, because Miller gets nudged out wide. But it allows Miller to take a tighter line through T1. Marquez leaves a gap because he's contending with Rins at the front. Wheel is CLEARLY shown to Alex and Miller has almost gone completely through. Except, Alex attempts to close the line and the door. It's too late by then though. First contact.

3) 4 laps to go: At the hairpin (T9), Miller does the classic Rossi overtake braking on the inside. This time, not only has Miller shown a wheel, he's shown 75% of his bike before they've even reached the turn-in point. So what does Marquez do? Concede the corner because he's already lost it? Nope. He turns in anyway. Mind you, Miller is ALREADY in the corner. Second contact. As the commentator says, "That's more Marquez contact with Miller than anything else."

4) Last lap: Into T1, Miller beats Marquez on the brakes, while set up on the inside. It's a block pass. They both tip in, Marquez tries to close a line that's not there. Almost runs into Miller. But again, Miller clearly establishes position. No contact.

This is racing, ladies. If you're set up on the inside and put a wheel on a rider's shoulder, that's all that is necessary to show that rider you're there. If you're fast enough, you'll get around him on the outside, as Jorge Lorenzo does on MANY occasions. If not, you have two options: 1) concede the corner because you've already lost it, or 2) take out the rider in front of you, as Pedrosa did to Hayden in Estoril 2006.

Marquez can dish out, but he can't take it. Instead of getting muffed four times, he should've considered that Miller would do that and close that line up earlier or consider another tactic. Fact was, Miller was extremely good on the brakes, which made up for the speed deficit he had to the Hondas.

Pages