Bridgestone Revises MotoGP Tire Allocation From Brno Onwards

Below is the official press release from Bridgestone:

 
Bridgestone propose revision of MotoGP tyre supply to the GP Commission
 
Sachsenring Circuit, Sunday 17 July 2011
 
Working together with the Safety Commission, where the riders, FIM, IRTA and Dorna are represented it has been decided to propose a change of the allocation of the tyres to the GP Commission. As such, Bridgestone has proposed a revision to its tyre allocation procedure and selected tyre compounds for the remaining races of the 2011 season, effective from the Czech Republic Grand Prix.
 
These latest host of changes come in response to rider feedback and succeed steps taken by Bridgestone in the last 18 months such as the development and early introduction of the extra soft compound in 2010, and the selection of softer tyre compounds for the Catalunya, British, Dutch, Italian and German Grands Prix so far this year.
 
For the United States Grand Prix at Laguna Seca next weekend, softer rear slicks incorporating Bridgestone’s extra soft compound rubber have been selected in a continued bid to improve warm-up performance, especially as the morning sessions can be cool.
 
Then from the Czech Republic Grand Prix onwards more significant changes will come into effect as Bridgestone will provide every rider with an increased number of front slick tyres, three front slick tyre compound options, and revise rear slick tyre allocation to enable riders to select a greater number of the compound option they prefer.
 
The previous regulations permitted two compound options of front and rear slicks and eight front and ten rear slick tyres per rider per weekend. Now, from Brno onwards, Bridgestone will prepare three compound options of front slick tyre per race and provide each rider with nine front tyres each weekend. Ten rear slick tyres will still be available in two compound options per weekend, but riders can now choose more of the tyre option they prefer, up to a maximum of six of one compound option and four of the other.
 
Hiroshi Yamada – Manager, Bridgestone Motorsport Department
“We have worked hard with the FIM, Dorna and the riders to make this proposal and the necessary regulation amendments and we make these significant changes to our tyre compound allocation procedure as part of our ongoing efforts to focus more on improving warm-up performance. When rider comments about warm-up performance started last year, we developed the extra soft compound rubber for the rear tyres to improve the situation. Then at the start of this year we already selected softer compound options for five of the first nine races, again to provide tyres that warm-up more quickly. Then during the Italian Grand Prix we decided to bring softer spec rears to a further six of the remaining nine races, and with this latest change to our tyre approach we very much hope to arrive at a situation where the riders feel satisfied with the extra tyre choices they have each weekend and more comfortable with additional softer tyres in the cooler morning sessions. The introduction of FP1 on Friday morning this year changed the situation for us because conditions are never ideal on Friday morning and this is when we have seen most of the crashes. Nevertheless, we take rider safety very seriously and of course we are sorry to have seen the crashes that we have this year and want to avoid such unnecessary occurrences. I hope this fundamental change to the Official Tyre Supplier situation demonstrates that we listen to riders and have long been working towards such a compromise to make them feel safer and more comfortable and confident in the warm-up performance of our tyres.”
 
Hirohide Hamashima – Assistant to Director, Motorsport Tyre Development Division
“We have spent a great deal of time speaking personally with riders, especially in recent months, and the raft of changes that we have proposed are in direct response to their feedback and comments, specifically relating to the warm-up performance of our tyres in the cooler morning sessions. It is important to note that all riders are very complimentary about the race-distance performance of our tyres, and that a number of lap records have been set in the last year on them, including today here in Germany, which indicate that outright performance is very good. However, we realise the need to focus more on the area of warm-up performance, and whilst we continue our development of a new family of tyres for next year which feature a softer construction, these changes that come into effect from Brno are our best effort at reacting as quickly as we can, and in a way satisfactory to all parties, mid-way through the season. The riders have agreed with our proposal so I am confident that the changes will provide them with what they’ve been asking for in terms of a greater number of softer specification tyres each weekend.”
 
 
 
A detailed summary of the proposed tyre allocation changes is available below.
 
Bridgestone’s revised tyre supply changes in detail
 
Front slick tyres:
 
With the introduction of a new soft option, three front slick tyre compound choices will now be available as follows:
Grand Prix
Soft
Medium
Hard
Extra Hard
Czech Republic
Third option
 
Indianapolis
Third option
 
San Marino
Third option
 
Aragon
Third option
 
Japan (*provisional)
Third option
 
Australia
 
 
Malaysia
 
 
Valencia
 
 
(* Japanese GP tyre selection provisional as the circuit has been resurfaced and tarmac analysis is underway)
 
In Australia and Valencia, the soft compound is already selected so a softer option is not available, making a third compound option unnecessary and of no benefit to the riders. In Malaysia, the high temperature and the high speed and heavy braking along the two main straights means that a third softer option would be unsuitable as wear rate would be too high and stability insufficient.
 
The number of front tyres available to each rider has also been increased by one tyre to a total of nine front slicks per weekend, even at the last three races where no third option is available. Crucially, there is also a change in the way riders can choose their split of compound options, making up to a maximum of three new soft front tyres available to every rider at the abovementioned races.
 
Now on Thursday every rider is allocated five front slick tyres: 2 harder options, 2 medium options and 1 new softer third option, specifically for the cooler morning session. After FP2, riders can then choose which compounds they want to receive for their final four front tyres (to make a total of nine).
 
This table illustrates the front compound choices available to every rider each weekend, up to a total of nine tyres:
 
1
2
3
4
5
Harder
Medium
Softer
 
The yellow marks the initial allocation of five front tyres made equally for every rider on Thursday. The remaining boxes indicate the remaining front tyre compound choices available to each rider, to reach a total of nine front tyres. This system allows riders to get two sessions of running on the Friday of a Grand Prix in which to check conditions and bike setup and then choose a further four front tyres that best suit them and their situation. Each rider is completely free to make his own choices within the total tyre number restriction.
 
 
Rear slick tyres:
 
An agreement was reached between Bridgestone and the FIM, Dorna and the riders during the Italian Grand Prix that rear slick tyre compound selections would be revised for the remainder of the season, meaning that softer rear slicks will be brought to six of the nine remaining races after the German Grand Prix. In light of this, and it being unnecessary to introduce a third option that was harder, riders will still receive two rear slick tyre compound choices at each Grand Prix. The total number of rear tyres available is also unchanged at ten per rider per weekend.
 
This means that the new softer rear tyre compound selection becomes as follows:
Grand Prix
Softer option (L and R shoulders)
Harder option (L and R shoulders)
United States Grand Prix
Soft / Extra Soft
Medium / Soft
Czech Republic Grand Prix
Soft / Medium
Medium / Hard
Indianapolis Grand Prix - unchanged
Hard / Soft
Extra Hard / Soft
San Marino Grand Prix
Soft / Medium
Medium / Hard
Grand Prix of Aragon
Soft
Medium
Japanese Grand Prix (*provisional)
Extra Soft / Soft
Soft / Medium
Australian Grand Prix
Medium / Extra Soft
Hard / Extra Soft
Malaysian Grand Prix - unchanged
Medium
Hard
Grand Prix of Valencia - unchanged
Medium / Extra Soft
Hard / Soft
(* Japanese GP tyre selection provisional as the circuit has been resurfaced and tarmac analysis is underway)
 
The allocation procedure for rear tyres has been changed to mimic that of front slick tyres though. On Thursday every rider is allocated eight rear slicks: 4 harder and 4 softer. After FP2, riders can then choose how they receive their final two rear tyres (to make a total of ten rears), in a combination of 5/5, 4/6 or 6/4 depending on the actual conditions during each weekend and each rider’s individual preference.
 
This table illustrates the rear compound choices available to every rider each weekend, up to a total of ten tyres:
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
Harder
Softer
The yellow marks the initial allocation of eight rear tyres made equally for every rider on Thursday. The remaining boxes indicate the remaining rear tyre compound choices available to each rider, to reach a total of ten rear tyres. This system allows riders to get two sessions of running on the Friday of a Grand Prix in which to check conditions and bike setup and then choose a further two rear tyres that best suit them and their situation. Each rider is completely free to make his own choices within the total tyre number restriction.
 
In the case of both front and rear tyres, this allows the riders softer options for Friday morning and then to choose whether they would prefer more of the softer or the harder fronts and rears for the rest of the weekend depending on the conditions on the opening day and the short-term forecast. If they require, this will give them a greater number of softer option front and rear slicks throughout the weekend.
 

 
 
2011

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Comments

Bridgestone are no doubt doing their best and naturally every racer wants every conceivable option available all weekend long. The rubber is the real black magic.
Thanks for the info David, but perhaps the riders are being spoiled for choice.
Bridgestone have of late been put in a zone where they are expected to anticipate the weather and surface by the hour at any geographical location. Asking a bit much are the riders I think.
Off tangent completely, but, how exciting would any race be if they cut costs and offered simple hard slick, medium intermediate and soft full wet options for each and every race ? No assymetric compounds per track either.
That will certainly transfer rider ability and adaptability to the forefront of any race and pull the rug out from under the electronics.
Of course it won't happen.
If these new proposals go through, the telemetry experts will need to have tire temperature data available by corner and lap by lap, conjuct with humidity sensors ( moisture by track sector integrated into equation) and edge thickness telemetry.
Maybe there exists a case for confining MotoGP to a keyboard...Heaven forbid !