Scott Jones, Ducati Corse

Photographer's Blog: This is No Sport for Old Men

Sometimes the guy in 6th place gets there with such style that his story is more compelling, more inspiring, and more enjoyable than the victor's. For me, the biggest story of Silverstone 2012 starts at least as early as Donington in 2008. James Toseland showed up to his home race in his rookie G.P. year to find the expected amount of media attention. It seemed in the days leading up the race that Toseland was on every front page in the country, and it also seemed impossible for any literate person in the U.K. not to know he was the local boy in the coming race at Donington Park. Not shy on courage, Toseland wore the English flag on his shoulders, literally, by appearing on Sunday in custom white leathers adorned with the red cross of St. George. 

What unfolded as the race began was painful to watch, even as a foreigner. Toseland charged into the first turn at Redgate and crashed. He gathered himself and his bike up and continued on, far behind the race for the victory, but was cheered as he made his lonely way from grandstand to grandstand. At least local hopes for a good result had not been made to suffer for long. 

Scott Jones At Silverstone 2012: Race Day


You spin me right round, baby


Moto2 - the battle for second. No quarter asked, none given


Jorge Lorenzo is looking fearsome so far this season

Scott Jones At Silverstone 2012: Qualifying Shots


You put your left leg in ...


What makes Silverstone so challenging is having to brake so hard as you tip the bike in. Jorge Lorenzo demonstrates the proper technique


Elbowz?


Elbows!

Scott Jones At Silverstone 2012: Friday Photos


Fastest Ducati rider of the weekend so far: Nicky Hayden


Crutchlow had a bad day on Friday, then a worse day on Saturday. No luck at home for the Englishman


Big skies at Silverstone

Scott Jones Shoots Miller: Race Day Photos


WSBK race starts, or how to squeeze as many bikes as possible into a small spot


The racing was good, and the backdrops were stunning


Sykes leads the early race 1 Superbike serpent

Scott Jones Shoots Miller: Sunday Superbikes


It's Miller Time!


An object lesson in braking, by Tom Sykes


It's hard, but at least John Hopkins is back on a bike

Scott "Scooter" Jones Shoots Miller: Saturday Spectacle


Ironic: The only permanent American rider in WSBK and John Hopkins finds himself having to learn the track


All around the world I've been looking ...


Miller Motorsports Park has one of the most dramatic backdrops of any circuit in the world

Photographer's Blog: Interview with Federica De Zottis, MotoGP Press Manager, Ducati Corse

Having worked directly with Max Biaggi, Casey Stoner, Nicky Hayden and Valentino Rossi, to name only a few, Federica De Zottis’ experience in Grand Prix motorcycle racing is truly unique. For the past five years she has worked closely with the Ducati Team riders, her current main responsibility on race weekends being to assist with the press duties of Valentino Rossi. When I approached her about the possibility of an interview, she was kind enough to invite me to the Ducati hospitality at Estoril to share her story.

 

Scott Jones: Federica, you're currently MotoGP Press Manager for Ducati Corse. Could you please describe your job for us?

Federica de Zottis: My job is split into two parts, the part that I do in the office in Bologna, and the part that I do here [in the MotoGP paddock]. Of course they are linked together, but during the winter I spend most of the time at the office.

Photographer's Blog: Interview with Rhys Edwards, HRC Communications and Marketing Manager

The longer I get to work in the MotoGP paddock, the more it strikes me how many talented people contribute to the show by working behind the curtain while a small percentage of personalities get most of the media attention. Rhys Edwards, whom you may recognize from his frequent position in Casey Stoner’s seat during shots of the Respol garage, is one of many people I’ve met who manage to perform roles of great responsibility while remaining friendly, approachable and warm individuals. When I learned something about his background in Formula One, I assumed he would have an interesting story to tell about his career and how he arrived at HRC, and he was generous enough to let me ask him some questions about his experience during the final GP weekend at Estoril.

Scott Jones: Rhys, you’re Communications and Marketing Manager at Honda Racing Corporation. Many of our readers may not know exactly what that means, so could you give a brief description of your role at HRC?

Scott Jones' Estoril Adventure: Saturday And Sunday


He's #1. And he showed just why on Sunday


No quarter given. Nor asked for. That's Moto2


Tech 3 boys Crutchlow and Dovizioso have been doing this every race so far this year

Scott Jones' Estoril Adventure: Friday Photos


The fourth alien? Tests for extraterrestrial DNA are inconclusive, but the signs are strong


Ben Spies' crew found the Texan's mojo again. It was right where they left it


One fast Australian

Scott Jones Shoots Jerez: Race Day


It was as close as this all race between Casey Stoner and Jorge Lorenzo


Fire in the hole


Uncle Joe surveys his domain: the Sherry Circuit

Scott Jones Shoots Jerez: Saturday Photos From Spain


Fastest man of Saturday? Dani Pedrosa. And here's why.


Pictures speak louder than words


Spanish skies in a nutshell: from slate grey to clear blue

Scott Jones Shoots Jerez: Friday Photos From Spain


New to MotoGP in 2012: Cylon Raiders


In the wet, the old Valentino Rossi turned up. And there was much rejoicing

Photographer's Blog: The Voices of MotoGP

When I entered the media center at Losail a few weeks ago, I happened to be thinking about how many people contribute to our enjoyment of MotoGP. From the journalists who write the background stories and race reports, to photographers who show us things we can't see on video, to the large number of people who produce the TV feed, each has his or her role in bringing us closer to the racing and increasing our enjoyment of what we see. 

Years ago I was an avid bicycle racer, very much inspired by watching Greg Lemond take on the world in a sport dominated by Europeans. The TV broadcasts featured the commentary of a man named Phil Liggett, who still works as one of the main voices of cycling broadcasts in English. Liggett's enthusiasm and passion for cycling are inseparable from my experience of watching those 1980s Tours de France (and every one since, in fact), and he has stuck in my mind as someone who will be, for many, as big a part of the events he described as the events themselves.

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