Photos

Thu, 2019-11-07 21:47
Body:


Valentino Rossi has an extra supply of mojo at Sepang. But it wasn't quite enough to get him past Andrea Dovizioso and onto the podium


On the grid, eyes ahead, and plan for Turn 1


Danilo Petrucci ponders the angle of the dangle


Back, on a Honda, and impressive. Prompting the question, what's next for Johann Zarco?


Jack Miller couldn't match his pace at Phillip Island, but he is putting himself in the picture for a factory ride


Pole man. But Fabio Quartararo failed to convert on Sunday. He still has a lot to learn.


On Saturday, Marc Marquez smashed himself violently into the tarmac. On Sunday, he still ended up second. Consistency is king


Check the position of Maverick Viñales' thumb. Then try to imagine riding a MotoGP bike without gripping on for dear life all the time


Andrea Iannone does the walk of shame after crashing


Valentino Rossi got past Andrea Dovizioso from time to time, but never for long enough to stay ahead of him.


Cal Crutchlow saves his rear tire by skimming it just above the tarmac


Hafizh Syahrin had a much tougher race this year compared to 2018. He was still welcomed like a hero


Rookie style check, part 1: Joan Mir


Rookie style check, part 2: Pecco Bagnaia


Franco Morbidelli finished ahead of Fabio Quartararo at the Petronas Yamaha SRT team's home race. That mattered


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

Wed, 2019-10-30 12:26
Body:


Phillip Island + rain = clear visors, and a sight of the concentration riding the track requires


Once upon a time, Valentino Rossi reigned supreme at Phillip Island. He needs help from Yamaha for those days to return


Phillip Island did not go to plan for Fabio Quartararo. A big crash on Friday, and another on on race day


Things were even worse for Miguel Oliveira, whose massive smash at Turn 1 caused qualifying to be canceled on Saturday. He might be forced to miss Sepang as well


Downside to Phillip Island: a small mistake can have serious consequences


Upside: we get a peek under the covers. Note the external flywheel, used to modify torque reaction from the engine (including manufacturing date). Vary the weight of the flywheel, and you change how the engine reacts. A V4 means there's room to do this. Also note how long the front frame spar is, all to provide some flex in the frame.


Cal Crutchlow conquered his demons at Phillip Island with a podium


Motion


Whither Lorenzo? The Spaniard had his worst race since returning to action at Phillip Island. It did nothing to quell the speculation of his imminent firing/retirement


Fabio Quartararo qualified on pole with a badly swollen ankle ...


Then made a mistake in Turn 2, and got hit by Danilo Petrucci ...


Ending with him being knocked off his bike and ending in the gravel. A bad weekend all round


When Maverick Viñales got past Cal Crutchlow, Marc Marquez knew he had to make his move


Marquez clamped on to Viñales like a limpet


Viñales attempt to retake the lead ended in disaster at MG


The bike did not fare well


Fortunately for Viñales, the only thing that was wounded was his ambition


The battle for third was intense. Jack Miller came out on top, in one of the strangest liveries of recent years

 

 


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

Tue, 2019-10-22 20:06
Body:


Is there light at the end of the tunnel for Valentino Rossi?


Maverick Viñales chased Andrea Dovizioso, but lacked the speed to pass


Miguel Oliveira spots his favorite photographer out of the corner of his eye


Even world champions listen when Jack Miller speaks


Top speeds recorded in a soaking FP3 were 303km/h. Imagine doing that with this much spray


Meta photo


Jorge Lorenzo was slow in the first laps, faster in the last laps. Is he on his way to a breakthrough?


Fabio Quartararo brakes for Turn 11, one finger on the front brake, front tire buried in the asphalt, rear skipping over the surface. He's good at this


If the Suzukis ever start from the front of the grid on a regular basis, the rest of the field is in trouble


Lap 1, Turn 3, game over


Parting the sea


The tunnels at Motegi are unique, and consequently, favorites with top togs like our Cormac...


... for fairly obvious reasons


Imagine doing this, in the wet, with a bum shoulder


On the #2 bike, Jim Redman. In the middle, HRC Technical Director Takeo Yokoyama. On the #93 bike, the man who won the constructors championship for Honda pretty much on his own

 


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

Fri, 2019-10-11 08:48
Body:


The weekend got off to a tough start at Buriram for Marc Marquez


Marc Marquez and Fabio Quartararo engaged in a battle of wills at the end of qualifying. Both men have the scuffed leathers to prove it


The dustbin fairing never really went away


10 days after getting a plate fitted to hold his broken wrist together, Pol Espargaro was riding again. He is made of stern stuff indeed


Jack Miller could have played a big role on Sunday, if he hadn't pressed the wrong button at the start...


Miller's mistake left Aleix Espargaro with a nice clean run at Turn 1 from the grid


One day, Suzuki will fix their problem with qualifying. Then things might get very interesting


It's been a tough second half of 2019 for Danilo Petrucci


Hafizh Syahrin, demonstrating how you bury a KTM on the brakes. He'll be back in Moto2 with Aspar next year


Trankie Frankie, the most laid-back man in the paddock, is really starting to find some speed


A whole grandstand came to see Marc Marquez win his sixth MotoGP title


Marquez followed Quartararo all race, and when he believed he was close enough, he took a shot


Teamwork makes the dream work


Honda made the RC213V worse, but faster, knowing that Marc Marquez would ride around the problems and win anyway

 


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

Tue, 2019-10-01 11:03
Body:

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


Rear wheel cover on the GP19 and carbon swingarm.
David Emmett: The full set of rear aerodynamics on the Ducati Desmosedici GP19, from the swingarm spoiler to the rear wheel covers. The rear wheel cover mounting points are clearly visible: at the rear of the chain tensioner, and at the front below the aluminum bracket with holes. The rear swingarm spoiler caused huge controversy at the start of the year, and now all manufacturers bar KTM have one.
Ducati used a loophole in the regulations to use the swingarm spoiler and wheel covers, but this loophole will be closed for 2020. For next season, all parts which are not part of the structural part of the motorcycle will be classified as part of the aero body, and so their designs will have to be homologated, with one update allowed during the season. So Ducati can start the season with one spoiler, and alter it once during the year.


Lighter front mudguard on the KTM RC16.
Peter Bom: Although it is a little bit difficult to see in this photo, the mudguard ends immediately after the double L of Bull. This leaves more of the front tire exposed, helping it to run a little cooler and prevent overheating. Some KTM riders have complained of this previously.


The electronics hub behind the fairing on Aron Canet's KTM Moto3 machine To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Andrea Dovizioso's GP19, second version of the aero fairing To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Michele Pirro's triple clamp with the holeshot device. To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Ducati GP19 carbon swingarm. To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Rotary steering damper and special head fork fixation (Zarco's RC16) To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


KTM RC16 carbon swingarm. To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Yamaha front wheel cover (Valentino Rossi)


Yamaha front wheel cover (Valentino Rossi)


Yamaha front wheel cover (Valentino Rossi) To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Yamaha carbon swingarm and dual exhaust (Valentino Rossi).


Yamaha carbon swingarm and dual exhaust (Valentino Rossi). To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Valentino Rossi's thumb operated rear brake. To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Aprilia's holeshot device. To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

Wed, 2019-09-25 15:42
Body:


Pol Esparagaro had a rough old time at the Motorland Aragon circuit, fracturing his wrist in a cold-tire highside in FP4


Rear grip. That's all Valentino Rossi was asking for


Joan Mir, back from injury and up to speed


Wild, empty, dry. And that's just the scenery


#82? #82? Seeing Mika Kallio with a different number took some getting used to


Bradley Smith? Karel Abraham? Hafizh Syahrin? Tito Rabat? These are not the riders Jorge Lorenzo is meant to be battling on the bike which leads the championship


Dark star


For the sin of T-boning Franco Morbidelli, Alex Rins got a long lap penalty


Danilo Petrucci lost his way after the summer break, and hasn't been able to find it again since


Look and learn


Rain. There was some of that on Saturday, and a slight reprise on Sunday


That feeling. Worth the sacrifice


The long view


High and dry

 

 


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

Tue, 2019-09-17 14:44
Body:

KTM have decided to replace Johann Zarco effective immediately. From Aragon until the end of 2019, current KTM test rider Mika Kallio will take the place of the Frenchman in the factory Red Bull KTM team.

Though the decision comes as a surprise to the outside world, it makes sense from the perspective of KTM. Zarco has announced his intention to leave at the end of the season, and given his options are limited for 2020, is looking at becoming a test rider, and has been linked to a possible vacancy at Yamaha. With so much work happening on the KTM RC16, and a constant flow of new parts in the garage, KTM have decided it is better to have test rider Mika Kallio on the bike than keeping Johann Zarco.

Zarco hinted at these motives on Sunday night at Misano. He told reporters he did not expect to receive new parts for the rest of 2019, and said he would not be taking part at a two-day test planned for Aragon after the race. "There will be a test at Aragon and I won't do it because it will be with a totally new bike and I am not any more in the confidence of KTM to be able to do this," Zarco said.

It is also a good move for Kallio and KTM. Kallio has made no secret of his desire to return to racing, and focused very hard on preparing the wildcard appearances he made last year. That was the reason KTM decided to scale those wildcards back, as they felt they were losing too much pure testing time to Kallio's desire to get ready for a race. This move allows Kallio to race, while also sharpening his speed to help improve his pace in testing.

Though Zarco will no longer be racing for KTM in 2019, the Austrian factory did say in the press release that they would 'honor his contract', code for paying out his salary for the rest of the year. 

Kallio replacing Zarco in 2019 does not necessarily mean he will replace the Frenchman in 2020 as well. KTM have not made a decision on who will team with Pol Espargaro for next season. At Misano, Pit Beirer told me that he did not expect to make an announcement until much later in the year. In the meantime, the rumor mill will continue to grind.

The press release from KTM appears below:


Mika Kallio replaces Johann Zarco for the rest of 2019 MotoGP

MotoGP announcement

Red Bull KTM will field current test rider Mika Kallio alongside Pol Espargaro for the remainder of the 2019 MotoGP campaign and starting from this weekend’s Gran Premio Michelin de Aragon and post-race test.

Kallio assumes Johann Zarco’s factory spot. Johann and KTM decided to mutually end their association at the end of 2019 but developments and on-going work mean that priorities have been realigned. The Frenchman will be exempt from his MotoGP duties but stays contracted to KTM until the end of the season.

KTM are in a crucial phase of the MotoGP project with an intense focus on the next generation of the RC16. Thanks to Kallio’s long-term testing role and experience the Finn will play a major part in gaining valuable data in racing conditions alongside Espargaro, who has posted seven top ten results in 2019 and qualified second on the grid at the last Grand Prix in San Marino.

Kallio - who rode the KTM on its debut in the MotoGP division in Valencia 2016 and has contributed strongly since the early testing phases of the RC16 - has already participated in seven wild card races from 2016 until 2018. With two top ten classifications on the MotoGP bikes and a career total of 16 GP victories and 49 podiums in the lower championship divisions, Kallio is eager to deliver new drive and momentum to KTM’s efforts in the premier class both for the rest of 2019 and with a view to the 2020 RC16.

Pit Beirer, KTM Motorsport Director: "We have to make decisions to ensure that we use our resources in the best possible way and we are currently in a positive direction with our MotoGP structure. We firmly believe that Mika can help us in this stage thanks to his knowledge and background. It is paramount that we verify our testing results in real race conditions to start our 2020 season in the best position. Mika has proved his ability on the RC16 and we are happy that he joins the line-up as a racer again. There is no doubt that we will focus on a new configuration with the #82 bike while fighting for points in the last races of the championship. At the same time we want to express gratitude to Johann for his effort since he joined our ambitious project in November last year. We now have to think of the future and are making this step accordingly. KTM will continue supporting him until the expiry of our contract at the end of the 2019 and we truly wish him all the best for his future."

Tue, 2019-09-17 09:58
Body:


A glimpse of the future. Quartararo vs Marquez is becoming a regular staple of MotoGP, and the sport is better for it


Almost pole for PolE. KTM progress is accelerating, so it won't be long now


On the bump stop: brakes get a workout at a couple of places around Misano


If it moves and it shouldn't, duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should ...


It was a long weekend for all of the Ducatis. Andrea Dovizioso came away having limited the damage, but points lost in the championship nonetheless


The two home boys had the worst weekend of the Yamaha riders. Valentino Rossi eventually came out ahead of Franco Morbidelli


Jack Miller rode hard, but ninth was that was possible


On the run into Turn 1


Triumph at Silverstone, disaster at Misano. If Alex Rins wants to challenge for the title, he'll have to stop making mistakes


Miguel Oliveira's upward trajectory was stymied by a shoulder injury picked up at Silverstone


Even the slow guys are fast in MotoGP


The aim for Jorge Lorenzo was to be 30 seconds behind the winner. He is a long way of taking on his teammate


The light in Misano is fantastic


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

Wed, 2019-09-04 12:47
Body:

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


The nose section of the Ducati fairing
Peter Bom: This is a great view of the inside of the nose section of the fairing. This is the air intake, which channels the air from the point of highest pressure at the nose, then channels it around the steering head and into the airbox, and from there into the engine.


A set of carbon Öhlins forks, as used by Maverick Viñales
Peter Bom: A set of carbon front fork legs for Viñales' Yamaha M1. You can clearly see here that the carbon is protected in the sections where the forks are held in the triple clamps. On the foremost fork leg, at the bottom behind the gas canister, we can see the two wheel speed sensors, and a temperature sensor for the brake disc.


The Suzuki GSX-RR exhaust To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


The Honda RC213V fuel tank To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


The right handlebar of the Aprilia RS-GP To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


The left handlebar of the Yamaha M1 To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Brembo front brake calipers To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Aero package used by Stefan Bradl on Jorge Lorenzo's Repsol Honda To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


New aero package on Marc Márquez' Honda RC213V, debuted at the Brno test To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Wheel cover and cooling duct on the Ducati Desmosedici GP19 To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

Mon, 2019-09-02 18:43
Body:

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


Ducati swingarm and wheel cover bracket
Peter Bom: This is the rear end of the Ducati swingarm, with the bracket for the aerodynamic wheel cover attached to the chain tensioner. Above the bracket and at the end of the swingarm, we can see an accelerometer. The data from this accelerometer is probably being used to tune the mass damper in the GP19's 'salad box' to match the circuit and the tires being used.


Suzuki's new winglets, first tested at Brno
Peter Bom: The Suzuki winglets look a bit like those used by KTM, and the latest version of Honda's aero package used by Marc Márquez in Austria is heading in the same direction. It's no surprise that neither the Yamaha nor the Suzuki have lower spoilers on the side of the fairing. They have the least horsepower, and so don't really need them.


Ducati's new upper winglet debuted at the Brno test To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Full new aero package used with the Ducati GP19 To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Franco Morbidelli's Yamaha M1, with the tank cover removed To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Cover on a Repsol Honda To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Tank and handlebar switches on a KTM RC16 To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


The new seat unit tried by the factory Yamaha riders at the Brno test To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


KTM's rotary steering damper To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


The rear wheel covers fitted to the Ducati GP19 To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Fabio Quartararo tested the carbon fiber Ohlins forks at the Brno test To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

Pages