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Tue, 2018-11-27 09:45
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Valencia was an occasion for goodbyes. MotoGP bade farewell to Dani Pedrosa, MotoGP Legend


Marc Marquez' shoulder is his Achilles heel


Desmo Dovi will get another chance next year


Alvaro Bautista's last MotoGP ride before heading off to WorldSBK


Petrucci's last ride at Pramac, before stepping up to the factory team


Alex Rins worked wet weather wonders on the Suzuki GSX-RR


Problem solved? Maverick Viñales found speed in the wet too


Another departure: Bradley Smith headed to Aprilia on Monday, after leaving KTM on Sunday night


We see you, Valentino


Temporary returnee: Stefan Bradl filled in for the injured Cal Crutchlow


Wet weather? Unpredictable grip? Best call Marc Marquez


Not quite like a fish in the water in MotoGP for Hafizh Syahrin


What does going fastest on Saturday get you? A chance to chat to damp reporters in Parc Ferme

 


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If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

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Thu, 2018-11-15 12:10
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It has been a long and eventful career for Dani Pedrosa, which draws to a close at Valencia. The Spaniard has been enormously successful: three world championships in 125s and 250s, 54 Grand Prix victories, 31 in the premier class, putting him seventh and eighth respectively all time. On Thursday, he will be made officially a MotoGP Legend by Dorna, to mark his achievements in the series.

Yet Pedrosa has always been an intensely private man. Like Casey Stoner, Pedrosa loved the racing passionately, but everything in between climbing off the bike after the latest race, and climbing back aboard for the next, that he could do without. He was always friendly to fans, and polite to reporters, but it was obvious from his media appearances that this was the one thing which interested him least of all.

At Aragon, I got a chance to take a look back at MotoGP with Pedrosa, and talk about how he had experienced it. It was a personal view of his life, and his approach to racing, rather than a dry look at his stats. Pedrosa talked about how he saw the series, about the things he loved and the things he hated, and about the difference between racing now, and racing in previous eras. He was open about himself as a human, and how his view of the world had changed through the years, and how, in a way, that played into his decision to stop racing.

Q: MotoGP has changed a lot in the time that you've been in it. How do you see the championship? What state is it in? What is going well, and what is going wrong? What were the good changes? What were the bad changes? What would you change if you were Carmelo?

Dani Pedrosa: In my opinion, and this I see every day in TV when I watch the news and you see all the political games from the right, left, and all this stuff, is that it's very easy to say from the outside, "Ah, I will do this and I will do that, and I will do the other, and blah, blah, blah." But you have to be in the big chair so you can say what you will do. Unless you have that pressure, with the circumstances, with all the inconveniences and all the good things, all the situations that surround that chair, unless you are there you can't just say, "I would." You can say it, of course, but you are not right. So this is something that I could only answer if I would be in his chair. But I would say that it's positive for the championship because every time we have more spectators. We are growing. Fans, sponsors and people, every time there is much more interest in MotoGP. I think it has been positive.

Q: I have a perspective as a journalist and as a fan, but as a rider?

DP: As a rider it's different than as a commercial boss, of course.

Q: Sometimes the choices that we make are good for the commercial side, but maybe not for riders. Is there anything that you as a rider think…?

DP: You as a rider, you have to adapt, otherwise you get out of the game. You need to develop in the championship. You have to be more versatile in being gentle with the press or being nice with sponsors, attending more and more events all the time. Still the racing is there, but every time it is less. It's more about the pre-race and the after race talk than the actual race.

This is positive in one sense because you can have more the guys that are not in the front, they have still some exposure. You talk about them. There are chats because this happened, that happened. While in the past, you only see the top three or five. So this is positive, also for the small teams and things like this. But of course for the rider, you have to be able to change your idea of what the championship is. But in my opinion when you want to be a top rider, you have to remember that this is racing, and racing is the only thing. At least, that's the point I like.

Q: That's why you race, for the racing.

DP: Yes, I race for the racing.

Q: Would you liked to have lived and raced in the 1970s, when it was turn up, race, and just live for racing? Casey was always one of those riders. You have riders who love the attention, love the show, who like the press. You are more like Casey. He retired very young because he was tired of it. You're more like that?

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Thu, 2018-11-15 09:47
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Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


Air cooling system on Kalex (Marc VDS), for water
Peter Bom: Moto2 engines automatically enrich the fuel mixture over 80°C in order to cool the engine. This rich mixture causes a slight loss of power and in the extremely tight Moto2 class, every detail is worth looking at. Here we see the MarcVDS team, cooling down there Moto2 engines while the bike waits in the pit box.


Air duct for front calipers (Yamaha YZR-M1)
Peter Bom: Air ducts to guide air to the brake caliper, and no covers over the carbon brake disks. Carbon brakes have a fixed temperature window in which they operate well. Too low and they don’t work (very low coefficient of friction), too high and they get damaged.


Seat adjustments on Lorenzo’s GP18 during FP1


Honda RC213V (Marc Márquez)


Under the tank of the Ducati GP17, Xavier Siméon (Tito Rabat's bike, out through injury)


Exhaust Ducati GP18 (Danilo Petrucci)


Ducati GP18, Andrea Dovizioso


Clutch lever sensor on Maverick Viñales bike


Brembo calipers


Carbon swingarm (Honda RC213V)


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

Mon, 2018-11-12 12:50
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Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


Torque sensor on the Yamaha M1
Peter Bom: Like all current MotoGP engines, the Yamaha M1 has a torque sensor fitted to the drive shaft. By measuring the amount of torque delivered on the track, the manufacturer can validate their engine dyno torque maps and fine tune them on the track. Note that Yamaha don’t use them on Sunday, that’s when everything should be sorted out. Left of the sprocket is an ‘inside-out’ or inverted sprocket which the external starter motor slides into.


Reinforced chassis on the Suzuki GSX-RR
Peter Bom: By gluing carbon fiber onto specific points, Suzuki can increase the stiffness of their chassis exactly where they want, and how much they want.


Aerodynamic outflows on the Ducati GP18 (Petrucci)


Suzuki GSX-RR engine


Honda RC213V tail (Marquez)


Carbon swingarm (Honda RC213V)


Front end of the Yamaha M1 (Valentino Rossi) with carbon fork


Electronics hub on the Yamaha M1


Ducati GP18 winglets


Electronics hub on the KTM RC16


Sensor on the clutch lever on Valentino Rossi’s M1 to evaluate starts. Maverick Viñales has a similar system


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

Thu, 2018-11-08 09:01
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A tire which was too hard even for Marc Marquez saw him doing this a lot. Sometimes, he even crashed


Hafizh Syahrin was inspired at his home race


The duel that never quite happened


That Suzuki GSX-RR is not a bad bike now. Riders are pretty decent now too


A couple more races on the Honda before he switches to a Yamaha. Will Franco Morbidelli start to fly on the M1?


As the season winds down, Johann Zarco winds up


Takaaki Nakagami climbs aboard for the last of the Pacific flyaways


Fast on the factory bike, fast on his own bike. Yet Alvaro Bautista is off to WorldSBK next season


Pole number 80 became win number 70, though the man in the background did everything in his power to prevent that


Pol Espargaro has slowly returned to fitness, and the KTM is starting to show some signs of progress


Full lean for Taka


"You want to know what?" Andrea Dovizioso gets a surprise question


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

Wed, 2018-11-07 17:21
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Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


Nakasuga’s YZR-M1 exhaust from above
Peter Bom: Exhaust configuration is vital for both power and engine character. Yamaha is using a four-into-two-into-one exhaust combination. Don’t be surprised if next year we see a different exhaust on the M1.


Winglets on GP18 (Dovizioso)
Peter Bom: The base of the winglet is integrated into the skin of the fairing to minimize air turbulence.


Suspension kit, harder or softer depending on the conditions and riding styles


When winglets are needed, just fit them on the fairing


Cooling system on the KTM Moto2 (Ajo) for Motegi and its hard braking points


Neutral push lever for seamless gearboxes (KTM RC16)


Valentino Rossi’s dashboard


System to cool down the water on a Kalex bike (Marc VDS).


Brake pressure and travel sensors on Katsuyuki Nakasuga's Yamaha M1


Tito Rabat’s calipers (used by Xavier Siméon)


Ventilated front mudguard on the RC213V


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

Wed, 2018-10-31 12:26
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Would the Yamaha be competitive at Phillip Island? Of course it would


Jackass was outstanding at his home round, but couldn't match the pace at the end of the race


Heavy wind, cold temperatures, hard tires. Dani Pedrosa's kryptonite trifecta


Big data, big difference


The King of Phillip Island? Only in odd years


Karel Abraham got a free upgrade in Australia


Little did Johann Zarco suspect what awaited him


Still not working the way it should for Valentino Rossi


Alvaro Bautista exceeded expectations in Australia. What a difference a factory bike, and a factory team, can make


Up, over, and down again. That's the magic of Phillip Island


Relations haven't always been this cordial. Winning cures a lot of ills


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

Sat, 2018-10-27 13:55
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Fast again. But the problem for Maverick Viñales is that the Yamaha is only quick at some tracks, and not others


This man, though, is the man to fear


Ready to go. A bit more ready than last year, for sure


Mattia Pasini leads Moto2 in Australia


Alvaro Bautista gets a go on a GP18. So far, so good


Andrea Dovizioso, better than 2017


Valentino Rossi used to own Phillip Island. He needs another Yamaha M1 if he wants to own it again


Collateral damage


Mike Jones is back, in for Alvaro Bautista. Scoring a point might be harder this year, though


Home race


Cal Crutchlow was quick, until a horrific crash at Turn 1 left him with a broken ankle


A lot of media interest for Jack Miller


Peekaboo


Pecco Bagnaia, the man who would be champ


Moto2 frame laid bare


The end Aprilia would like to be showing the competition


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you'd like a print of one of Andrew Gosling's shots, then send Andrew an email and he'll be happy to help.

Fri, 2018-10-12 08:26
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Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.
As Tom was not in Thailand, here are some photos of things he has noticed at recent races.


Right handlebar of Valentino Rossi's Movistar Yamaha M1
Peter Bom: Although the bike is ‘ride by wire’, Yamaha still rely on the natural feeling of Bowden cables for the rider throttle, where both Honda en Ducati have electric wires coming from the throttle housing.


Left handlebar of Valentino Rossi's Movistar Yamaha M1
Peter Bom: The small wheel in front of the handlebar is there so the rider can adjust the position of the front brake lever while riding. Riders are very sensitive to the front brake pressure point, and this might change during the first laps out as a result of the temperature changes.


Under the 'salad box', at the rear of Jack Miller's Pramac Ducati Desmosedici GP17


Suzuki GSX-RR swingarm on Andrea Iannone's bike


New aerodynamic fairing for the KTM RC16 on Pol Espargaró's bike. First appeared at Misano


Front view of the new aerodynamic fairing for the KTM RC16 on Pol Espargaró's bike. First appeared at Misano


Brembo monobloc brake calipers


Ducati GP18 carbon swingarm


Under the tank cover of a Monster Tech3 Yamaha M1


Head of a fork tube (Stefan Bradl’s Honda RC213V)


Three connectors on the front fork of a Ducati GP18, the left one goes to a (hidden) sensor that measures the acceleration of the unsprung part of the front fork, needed to judge front fork damping qualities. The middle one is connected to two (!) wheel speed sensors. Just to show you how important measuring wheel speed is, they connect two identical sensors just in case one breaks. The right-hand connector is there for the sensor that measures the temperature of the carbon brake disc using infrared. Pretty important as the carbon brakes need to be kept between 300° and 700° Celsius. Any lower and they are just not there when you need them, anything higher and they are damaged beyond repair (and they are very, very costly).


Yamaha M1 rear suspension


Honda RC213V fairing (Márquez)


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

Thu, 2018-09-27 09:30
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Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


KTM RC 250 R engine (Moto3)
Peter Bom: This engine is tilted backwards for cleaning and maintenance. Note the (orange) caps that keep dirt out of the inlet / exhaust ports during transport and cleaning. The aluminum box on the left is the water / oil intercooler. Here, instead of using an oil cooler, the water from the radiator cools the engine oil.


Gyroscopic sensor on the Ducati fork
Peter Bom: A two-axis acceleration sensor fitted close to the wheel axle of the front fork. Measuring the acceleration forces inline with the fork, together with the suspension stroke sensors, gives the engineers a clear view of the damping qualities of the front fork. The 2nd axis measures the lateral forces that will show understeer.


Dell’Orto ECU used in Moto3 and Dorna unit used for TV
Peter Bom: Note the difference: all the ‘not so neatly’ fitted electronic boxes are there for Dorna TV coverage. Not all bikes in Moto3 have to use them, it’s the price of being successful…


Cooling system to cool down the caliper (Yamaha M1)


Aerodynamic cover on Danilo Petrucci’s Ducati GP18 front fork


Carbon swingarm on the Aprilia RS-GP. That part has been used on and off since Austria (the first time Tom Morsellino saw it)


Ventilated mudguard on the Yamaha M1, appeared at Barcelona


Honda RC213V carbon swingarm


Cooling system for the rear brake caliper (Marc Márquez)


Carbon/aluminum top triple clump on Ducati GP18


Brembo bake system (Honda RC213V)


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

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