Tom's Tech Treasures: New Frames And The Importance Of Airflow - Photos From Assen And Sachsenring

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


The frame on one of Valentino Rossi's Yamaha M1s
Peter Bom/David Emmett: At both Assen and the Sachsenring, Valentino Rossi had two different frames on each of his Yamaha M1 bikes. One with a weld on the frame, one without (below). According to Maio Meregalli, the two frames are identical except for the weld (which is present, but has been ground down). This changes the flex a fraction, and gives a very slightly different feedback. At Assen, Rossi only used the frame with the visible weld.
Note also the rubber band being used as a brake lever return spring. Rossi is now the only rider using a rubber band instead of a steel spring, something which used to be common but is now rare. The spring/rubber band is there to give the riders enough resistance, a 'good' rear brake feels quite heavy. The spring is available in a variety of spring rates or stiffnesses (see the color at Honda), and the preload can be adjusted as well. No such nonsense with this old-school rubber band on a multi-million dollar racing motorcycle.


Valentino Rossi's second frame
Peter Bom/David Emmett: The horizontal weld, just above the clutch, has been ground off on this frame, though you can just see the line where the weld remains. Removing the external weld changes the character a little. Rossi chose these chassis at the start of the season.


Frame on Maverick Viñales' Yamaha M1 To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Energica Ego Corsa MotoE rear shock with the suspension sensor To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Plug to retrieve data from the MotoE Energica Ego Corsa To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Jack Miller used the rear wheel cover on his Ducati GP19 for the first time in Germany. To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Some Moto2 teams used a new exhaust from Assen (shown here on Xavi Vierge's Kalex) To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Before his crash at Assen, Jorge Lorenzo used the new fairing with the larger lower winglets To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Jorge Lorenzo's Honda RC213V with the new frame and new knee supports To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Marc Marquez used the new frame during free practices in Germany To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


"Old" fairing on the KTM Moto2 with air intakes going to both sides of the bike. To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


New fairing with central air intake on the KTM Moto2. To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


KTM Moto3 (Aron Canet) To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Johann Zarco tried a different tank cover for his KTM RC16 in Germany To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


Energica Ego Corsa frame, if the lights are red... run away ! To see the technical explanation for this photo, sign up to be a site supporter.


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website. You can find out more about subscribing to MotoMatters.com here.

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Comments

This is really good stuff, keep it coming!

Hi David, I'm referring to Peter tweet on Jul 5th where it is metinoed "Fork (front) springs in the new MotoE class can go up as high as 170Nm. MotoGP or Moto2 are around 80.". What about the spring of the rear suspension? When I was in Valencia, I heard some teams asking for a 150 (I do not know what it means) instead of 130 for the rear suspension. What could be the meaning of these numbers?
Pietro