Tom's Tech Treasures: Close Up With The 2019 MotoE And Triumph-Powered Moto2 Machines

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


Behind the fairing of the Kalex (Marc VDS)
Peter Bom: A typical winter test photo. The wiring hasn't been tidied up and isn't very neat. Below the clutch lever, you can see a sensor which measures the movement of the steering damper. This isn't part of the ECU strategy (yet), but it does tell the data engineer a lot about the position of the bike, for example, if the bike is getting sideways when braking.


Triggered wheel to compute the wheel speed (MotoE)
Peter Bom: Wheel speed trigger ring with a lot of slots. This allows the wheel speed to be measured much more accurately. The brake disc looks a little small, given the weight which it needs to stop.


KTM (Brad Binder), the bike looks smaller with the Triumph engine


Air intake on the KTM, also used on the RC16 in MotoGP


Fuel pump on the MV Agusta


Chain guide on the KTM


Custom tank on Xavi Cardelus KTM


Speed Up with the Triumph engine


Energica Ego Corsa (MotoE) dashboard


Moto2 mandatory switch set


MV Agusta


KTM Moto2 warming up


Electronics hub on the KTM


Kalex chassis. Note the carbon part used to fit the “old” fairing. A new fairing will be introduced next year.


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

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Comments

I really enjoy these pieces. Beautiful pictures and great explanations. Thank you.

I really enjoy these posts as it gives me a chance to really get my head around how complicated all these bikes are. I've always known them to be complex but getting to see it in such detail makes it abundantly clear.

You are correct, it is a KTM. Caption corrected now.