Press Release Interview: Yamaha's Alex Lowes On Using A Sports Psychologist

The Pata Yamaha team issued the following press release, containing an interview with Alex Lowes. In it, the rider talks about something others are not keen on discussing, using a sports psychologist in search of better results. An interesting read:


Alex Lowes Q&A: Working with a Sports Psychologist

Sports psychologists are becoming more and more common in motorcycle racing, with people curious about the affect they can have. Yamaha-racing.com caught up with Pata Yamaha Official WorldSBK Team's Alex Lowes to discuss his use of a sports psychologist and the difference it has made.

Pata Yamaha Official WorldSBK Team's Alex Lowes has had a positive start to the 2017 FIM Superbike World Championship season. The British rider has recorded two podiums so far this season and has added consistency to his undeniable pace to currently lie fifth in the championship standings. One of the things he attributes this new attitude to has been his work with a sports psychologist. In modern sport, most professional athletes will use a sports psychologist in some way or another, and with motorcycle racing being a sport that places so much mental demand on a rider, some people find it a shock that more people don't use them. Lowes answered our questions ahead of the WorldSBK summer break:

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Paddock Pass Podcast Episode 56: Shaking Things Up At The Sachsenring

After a rather excessive delay (for which you have our apologies) caused by technical issues, the latest episode of the Paddock Pass Podcast is finally here. This episode Neil Morrison and David Emmett discuss the events of a thrilling Sachsenring MotoGP race.

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MotoGP Silly Season Update - Summer Break Means Feverish Negotiations

The MotoGP bikes have fallen silent for over a week now, the teams and riders dispersed to the four winds, nominally for "vacation". And while riders relaxed on a beach somewhere for a week before returning to their training for the second half of the season, teams and rider managers have been anything but dormant. There has been a hive of activity in preparation for the latter half of the season, and for some of the satellite teams, for 2018 as well.

For the Silly Season That Wasn't Supposed To Be has stepped up a gear. The summer break has so far seen extensive negotiations going on over the MotoGP seats which will be free in 2018, and in some cases, whether a seat will become available or not. Phone calls to team staff start with pleasantries about vacation time, but quickly reveal that vacation consists of at best a day or two taken in between meetings and preparations for the remainder of the year.

The first shoe to drop in the summer edition of MotoGP's 2018 Silly Season is the revelation by Motorsport.com that Jack Miller will be joining Danilo Petrucci at Pramac Ducati for next season. After losing his direct contract with HRC – that contract going to Cal Crutchlow instead – the Australian had been in talks with the Marc VDS squad about a contract directly with the team. However, a failure to agree terms over money, and a better offer from Ducati, pushed Miller towards Pramac.

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Romano Fenati Moves Up To Moto2 In 2018 With Snipers Team

Romano Fenati is to move up to the Moto2 class with his current team, Snipers Team, in 2018. The press release, shown below, implies that the team will consist of a single rider, Fenati, in Moto2. The team have yet to agree terms with a chassis supplier, but state that they will probably field a Kalex.


Romano Fenati Moves Up To Moto2 In 2018

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Subscriber Only Feature: Which Direction For WorldSBK?

After Laguna Seca the future of WorldSBK was once again questioned. Asking the right question may be more important than finding the right answer immediately

“I've said it before and I'll say it again, democracy simply doesn't work,” so said this intrepid reporter when faced with reports that Bart's Comet would bring destruction to Springfield. It was a time of uncertainty and peril for America's greatest city but one from which it recovered by maintaining the status-quo.

While the WorldSBK paddock isn't standing on Mount Springfield singing Que Sera Sera and waiting for the comet to hit, it is facing a moment of truth about where the series is heading. It's always easier to swim with the tide but for WorldSBK patience and thoroughness are more important than being swift and decisive in making the wrong decision.

Since Imola the paddock WorldSBK has been filled with rumor and counter rumor about the direction that the series will take. Will there be a spec ECU? Will there be concessions for different manufacturers? Will there be testing restrictions placed on the successful teams? The list of possibilities has been the talk of the paddock with Dorna's Carmelo Ezpeleta even suggesting making the series into a Stock class, but what is actually best for WorldSBK?

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Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - How do you solve a problem like Andrea?

Suzuki is having a nightmare MotoGP season; who to blame: the riders, the factory or the team?

I’ve already said it, but I’ll say it again, I like Andrea Iannone, mostly because he’s funny. MotoGP is lucky at the moment, not least because the grid includes a full rainbow of characters, from angelic assassins and gritty little boxers to scary old men and (pantomime) gangsters.

It’s not me suggesting Iannone is a wannabe gangster. A journalist recently asked the Italian what he would do for a living if he didn’t race bikes and he immediately replied he would be a gangster.

Meanwhile Iannone still races bikes and right now he’s got a problem. His performances with Suzuki have plotted a steadily downward path since he first got on the GSX-RR last November: from quietly promising to loudly disappointing.

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Interview: Aspar's Gino Borsoi On Creating A Pathway To MotoGP For Young Talent

The world of motorcycle racing is undergoing a major change behind the scenes. Increasingly, teams are working on creating a path for bringing on young and talented riders. Where once individual teams would merely scour the classes below the one they competed in for talent, and engage in bidding wars for the most promising riders, now, they take a very different tack. Talent scouting starts at the very lowest level, and a path created all the way from Pre-Moto3 to MotoGP.

One of the first examples of teams creating such a pathway came about when Marc VDS teamed up with Monlau for the 2015 season. Monlau had an existing racing structure in Spain, reaching down to regional championships, as well as a technical academy for budding race engineers. Marc VDS had a successful Moto2 team which could take over from the Monlau operation, and a newly created MotoGP operation. Suddenly, the team had a complete package they could offer riders, with sponsorship and consistent support starting in Pre-Moto3 and carrying on through the FIM CEV, Moto3, Moto2, and MotoGP. All with the backing of Spanish beer giant Estrella Galicia.

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Oliveira Joins Smith And Espargaro For KTM MotoGP Test At Aragon

The KTM MotoGP team completed a two-day test at the Motorland Aragon circuit last week, and issued the following press release afterward:


Red Bull KTM Factory Racing Team concludes positive MotoGP test before summer break

MotoGP Private Test 2017 – MotorLand Aragon (ESP)

Following on from the Dutch TT and the German MotoGP, Red Bull KTM MotoGP Factory Racing Team have just completed a two day test in Aragon, Spain, with no less than four riders riding the KTM RC16.

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