2017 Valencia Moto2 & Moto3 Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the Moto2 and Moto3 teams after the final round of the season:


MARTIN WRAPS UP 2017 IN STYLE WITH MAIDEN WIN AT VALENCIA

After nine pole position and eight podium finishes, Jorge Martin took a well-deserved maiden Moto3 World Championship win today after a superb performance at Valencia’s Ricardo Tormo Circuit – the track which hosted this weekend the season finale of MotoGP.

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Valencia MotoGP Test Tuesday 12:00 Times - Marquez Fastest, Rossi Crashes

The 2018 season is officially underway at a sunny but very cold Valencia, riders waiting for a while before taking to the track en masse. The newcomers were among the first to get out and ride, but they were soon joined by most of the regulars.

Marc Marquez was the fastest man at noon, half a second quicker than Johann Zarco, while Maverick Viñales was third quickest, ahead of Pol Espargaro on the KTM. Marquez started his 2018 season off in the same style as he ended 2017, with a massive front end save that would have seen anyone else end up in the gravel. Tito Rabat was the first rider to crash, putting his Avintia Ducati into the gravel trap, but his crash was only minor compared to Valentino Rossi's, the Movistar Yamaha rider completely destroying the bike he was on at Turn 10, though he came away relatively unscathed.

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Livio Suppo To Leave HRC At End Of 2017

In a shock development, Repsol Honda team principal Livio Suppo is to leave HRC at the end of this season. The Italian still had a year on his contract, but decided to leave early. Neither his future destination nor his replacement are known at the moment.

The HRC press release appears below:


Livio Suppo to leave HRC following 2017 MotoGP season

Honda Racing Corporation wishes to announce that Livio Suppo has decided to move on from his role as Repsol Honda’s Team Principal and leave the Company.

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2017 Valencia MotoGP Post-Race Round Up: When Team Orders Go Bad, And Other Miracles

In a season which has been rammed to the rafters with drama, it is entirely appropriate that the final round of the year should be just as dramatic. It was partly to be expected, of course, with a championship at stake. Sure, Marc Márquez entered the weekend with a nigh insurmountable 21-point lead. But he still had to finish at least eleventh or else hope that Andrea Dovizioso did not win the race.

Things were looking good after qualifying: Márquez would be starting from pole, while Dovizioso would have to line up on the third row of the grid. Between the two, a host of fast rivals capable of getting in the way of Dovizioso's charge to the front, and perhaps even depriving him of the race win by taking victory in their own right.

By the time the checkered flag fell at the end of the race, enough had happened to fill a Greek epic. Team orders and betrayal, crashes and near crashes, deceit and disguise, secret swapping of bikes, and a bunch or people finishing much higher than any had a right to expect. An intriguing winner, a rider deprived of victory, and at last, a champion crowned. If the 17 races before Valencia had generated plenty to talk about, the final race of the year topped it all.

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2017 Valencia MotoGP Saturday Round Up: Two Men Enter, One Man Leaves

It is a quote I have used so often that it has become a cliché. When I asked the now sorely-missed Nicky Hayden what motivated him after a difficult day, he replied "That's why we line up on Sunday; you never know what's gonna happen." That is as true now as it was then, but you cannot escape the law of probabilities. Of course you never know what's going to happen on any given Sunday. But if you want to hang on to your money, it is wise not to bet against the most likely course of events.

As of Saturday night, Andrea Dovizioso can still become 2017 MotoGP champion. But he trails Marc Márquez by 21 points in the championship. He has to win the race to even have a chance. Márquez has to finish no better than twelfth. Dovizioso starts the race from ninth on the grid. Márquez starts from pole. And Márquez, Dani Pedrosa, Jorge Lorenzo, and Johann Zarco all have (slightly) better race pace than Dovizioso.

The chances that Dovizioso becomes champion in this timeline are rather slim. Bookies have the odds of the Factory Ducati rider winning the 2017 title at 14/1. They have Márquez at 1/50: even when interest rates are at a record low, you would make more money by putting your cash into a savings account rather than having a flutter on the Spaniard wrapping up his fourth MotoGP title on Sunday.

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Silverstone To Host British MotoGP Round For Three More Years

In a somewhat surprising development, Silverstone has signed up to host the British round of MotoGP for three more years. The Northamptonshire circuit is to hold the race through 2020. 

Since the British round was held earlier this year, it looked like the race would go to Donington. The Leicestershire track had shown renewed interest in the race, after the circuit had been bought by MSV, who also run the BSB series and own several other British tracks. Hosting the series at Donington would have required upgrades in a number of areas, however, and making those in time for August next year would have been difficult.

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