Paddock Pass Podcast Episode 72: Talking Jerez With Adam and Tom

The latest episode of the Paddock Pass Podcast is out, and it features a bumper crop of guests. Regulars Neil Morrison and David Emmett were joined by top French journalist Thomas Baujard of Moto Journal, and MXGP expert Adam Wheeler, who runs the outstanding On Track Off Road website. After the dramatic race at Jerez, they had a lot to talk about.

First up, the guys walk through the dramatic events at Jerez, focusing especially on the three-rider pile up involving Jorge Lorenzo, Dani Pedrosa, and Andrea Dovizioso. We talk about the fall out from that crash, about Marc Marquez' comfortable victory, and how the crash flattered the finishing positions of the remaining riders.

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2018 Jerez MotoGP Monday Test Round Up: Big Things Coming, But Not Here, Yet

Once upon a time, a post-race test would see almost a full complement of riders taking part. But in the past couple of years that has changed, as spec software has meant fewer things to do. The spec software, the engine freeze, the aerodynamics freeze: there is less to test, and so more factories are opting out of the one-day post-race tests. So it was at Jerez on Monday that the factory Ducati riders, the Ecstar Suzuki team, and the Gresini Aprilia squad all decided to skip the test at Jerez in favor of some private testing at Mugello later in the week. Behind closed doors, they can work a little more freely, away from the prying eyes of the press, and especially of a contingent of photographers.

There are other reasons to be wary of a post-race test. The track is in as good a condition as it is going to get on the Monday after a race. It has been swept clean by a weekend of racing, and the last class to smear its rubber all over the track is MotoGP. So the bikes are treated to a clean, well rubbered in circuit, allowing lap times to drop. The average improvement between the race and the test was nearly 1.3 seconds a lap. About half the 16 permanent riders who took to the track on Monday improved their times from qualifying. It is fair to say that Monday tests can be deceptive.

Nothing gained

That was certainly Maverick Viñales' view of the test. "Well, Monday is always positive but we have to be positive on Sunday," the Movistar Yamaha rider said. "We didn’t solve nothing." The Spaniard ended the test as fourth fastest, behind Johann Zarco, Cal Crutchlow, and Dani Pedrosa, but he put it down to the conditions. "In the morning it was really different – much more grip, and much easier. Easier to do 1'38 lows. During the weekend it was impossible to do that."

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2018 Jerez MotoGP Sunday Round Up: Of Crashes, Blame, And Championships

Racing produces drama. When you put 24 riders on an equal number of 270hp MotoGP machines, you can never be certain of the outcome. The tired and obvious story lines you had written in your head before the race have a tendency to go up in smoke once the flag drops. Racing produces a new reality, often surprising, rarely predictable.

But that doesn't stop us from drawing up a picture after practice of how the race is going to play out. At a tight track like Jerez, passing is difficult, and so the rider who can get the holeshot can try to open a gap and run away at the front. After qualifying, it was clear that the three factory-backed Hondas were strongest, the Repsols of Marc Márquez and Dani Pedrosa, together with the LCR Honda of Cal Crutchlow were all a cut above the rest. It would be an all-RC213V podium, with the other manufacturers left to fight over the scraps. The Ducatis would do battle with the Suzukis, and the Yamahas would find some pace at last, and get in among it at the front.

It didn't pan out that way, of course. Yes, a Honda dominated proceedings. Yes, a couple of Ducatis battled with a couple of Suzukis at different points during the race. And yes, the Yamahas found some pace, with Wilco Zeelenberg telling me shortly before the race that during warm up on Sunday morning they had found a little bit of the grip they had been missing. But the race resolutely failed to stick to the script we all had in our heads before the start.

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Ducati CEO Elected Chair Of The MSMA

Ducati today announced that their CEO, Claudio Domenicali, has been elected chair of the MSMA, the representative body of the manufacturers in MotoGP. The press release appears below:


Claudio Domenicali appointed new Chairman of MSMA (Motorcycle Sports Manufacturers’ Association)

Jerez de la Frontera (Spain), 6th May 2018 - The MSMA Members’ General Meeting, held at Jerez de la Frontera during the Spanish GP, has elected Claudio Domenicali (CEO of Ducati Motor Holding SpA) as the new Chairman of MSMA for the next two years.

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