Latest World Superbike News

Crunching The Numbers: Jonathan Rea vs MotoGP vs WorldSBK - An Analysis

The start of December marks the beginning of what is rapidly becoming a tradition in the world of motorcycle racing. After the Jerez test in late November, it is now "Why Is Jonathan Rea Faster Than A MotoGP Bike" season. At Jerez, Rea pushed his Kawasaki ZX-10R WorldSBK machine – down 35+ bhp and up 10+ kg – to the fourth fastest overall time of the week, ahead of eleven MotoGP regulars (including two rookies), three MotoGP test riders and Alex Márquez, who the Marc VDS team were using to train up the new crew recruited to look after Tom Luthi's side of the garage while the Swiss rider is still injured.

How is this possible? And what does this mean? Are WorldSBK machines too close to MotoGP bikes? Why are MotoGP manufacturers spending ten times as much to be shown up at a test by Jonathan Rea? And why, for the sake of all that is holy, does Jonathan Rea not have a MotoGP ride?

The answer to all but the last of those questions is buried away in the bigger picture of the laps posted throughout the week. When you examine the numbers, the picture is a lot more complex than the headline times seem to suggest. Tires, temperature, and track all play a part. But all of that can't disguise a rather outsize dose of talent.

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PJ Jacobsen Moves Up To WorldSBK With TripleM Honda

The WorldSBK class is to have at least one American racer in 2018. Today, Honda Racing announced that PJ Jacobsen will be moving up to the World Superbikes class for next season. The 24-year-old American will be racing for the TripleM team, who are also making the move up to WorldSBK after in the Superstock 1000 class for the past five seasons.

Jacobsen has been a consistent contender in World Supersport since joining the class in 2014, scoring two wins and getting on the podium 16 times in total in his career. He had his year in WorldSSP on a Honda in 2015, winning at Sepang and Magny-Cours.

Jacobsen may not be the only American rider to race in WorldSBK in 2018. There are strong rumors linking Jake Gagne to the second seat in the Red Bull Honda team, alongside Leon Camier. Gagne filled in at the Red Bull Honda WorldSBK team at Magny-Cours and Qatar, and is believed to be a strong favorite with Honda and the team's title sponsor Red Bull. Red Bull Honda team manager Kervin Bos refused to comment on the Gagne rumors at the recent Jerez test. Nevertheless, everyone in WorldSBK not wearing a Honda shirt remained fully convinced that it is Gagne who will get the nod.

The Honda press release announcing PJ Jacobsen's signing follows:


PJ Jacobsen graduates to WorldSBK championship with TripleM Honda WSBK Team in 2018

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Leon Camier: A Leap Into The Unknown

When a rider changes team they also face the same question; will I sink or swim? First impressions from riding the Honda are that Camier will be swimming

Leon Camier was the central pin of the 2018 rider market in WorldSBK. The former British champion was sought after having proven his worth as a development rider in turning around the fortunes of MV Agusta. He faces a similar task for next year having joined the unfancied and under performing Honda squad.

First impressions for Camier have left the Englishman confident of a season where he can once again perform above expectations. After three days of winter testing at Jerez Camier enthused his excitement for the year ahead and the possibilities of a bright future for Honda.

“I'm very excited after the test because I wasn't expecting us to be this quick at the first test,” said Camier. “To be straight into the battle with Fores and Van der Mark is very positive for us. We need to make the right changes going forward and put us in the right direction for development for the winter so that we're ready at the next test to keep progressing.

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Eugene Laverty: No Rest Betwixt MotoGP and WorldSBK

360 laps at Jerez for the Irishman as he jumps from SBK to MotoGP bike. The contrast in both offers clarification of what he needs for 2018

Eugene Laverty had a busy week at the Jerez test. The Aprilia WorldSBK rider spent the opening two days riding his regular mount before being drafted into MotoGP duty in place of the injured Aleix Espargaro. For Laverty, it was the first opportunity to lap on the Grand Prix machine in 12 months, and he was kept busy with five days of testing.

“It's been a busy week,” said Laverty. “I did about 360 laps this week on the Superbike and the MotoGP bikes. It was a full week. I didn't really get a chance all week to look to set my ideal laptime because I was riding Aleix' bike and he's a lot taller than me. To be fast on it I can't load the front enough because of how much of a different size we are.

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Alex Lowes: A Change For The Better?

Making a change at the crew chief position can reap rewards or add a new set of challenges. For Alex Lowes the 2018 season will see him work with Andrew Pitt and first impressions were very positive at the Jerez test.

A change can be as good as a holiday and having fresh eyes to look at a problem can lead to new solutions. For Alex Lowes, the 2018 season will see the former British champion work with a new crew chief, but following the Jerez test the Yamaha rider is excited by the prospect of working with Andrew Pitt.

“It’s been a really good,” said Lowes. “You’re always a bit anxious when you make a change like this because the rider crew chief relationship is probably the most important that you have. This week has been fantastic because a lot of the things I’ve been struggling with Andrew, with his experience as a rider, has been able to help me with a lot already. We put some new ideas into the pot that we didn’t have before and that’s transformed into some improvements on the bike. It’s been really good so far and this sort of relationship only gets better so I’m looking forward to the next tests as this couldn’t have gone any better.”

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Marco Melandri: "The New Rules Are Hurting Ducati More Than Anyone"

The Jerez test offered the first chance to see the new regulations in action. For Marco Melandri it confirmed his worst fears; Ducati are being hit harder than anyone

That Ducati has been hit hardest by the 2018 regulations shouldn't come as a surprise, but following three days of testing at Jerez it was surprising how morose Marco Melandri felt. The Italian returned to WorldSBK in 2017 and was able to have a strong season that was highlighted by a victory in front of his home fans at Misano.

A winter of testing was expected to see the former 250GP champion once again a position to chase a title. Instead he was left chasing his tail at Jerez and acknowledging the mountain that the Italian manufacturer may have to climb. Rome wasn't built in a day and after three years of Ducati rebuilding their WorldSBK title challenge Melandri made it clear the extent of the challenge facing the team.

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Jerez WorldSBK & MotoGP Test Wednesday Notes: Hard Work, Secretive Factories, And New Asphalt

It has been a very busy track at Jerez, with a total of 27 bikes on track at some point or other on Wednesday, with a good mixture of MotoGP, WorldSBK, and the Honda Racing BSB team of Jason O'Halloran and Dan Linfoot. What the first day of testing showed is that the WorldSBK bikes are almost as fast as a MotoGP machine – or at least, a Kawasaki is, shod with qualifiers and ridden with sufficient attitude by Tom Sykes in this case – and that the new surface means the track is a good deal quicker than it was when the MotoGP race was held here back in May. Full times are here.

As it is a private test, there is very little official communication from the teams, despite the fact that a group of journalists – including myself – is here in the paddock. KTM and Suzuki have been forthcoming and helpful, Ducati are cagey, Aprilia don't have much to test, and Honda are secretive – and all of the work is currently falling on Cal Crutchlow's shoulders, as the Repsol Honda team are saving their test days for next year. Honda are not as secretive as Yamaha, however, who are holding their private test over in Sepang, under a virtual media blackout. All we know about that is that Valentino Rossi, Maverick Viñales, Johann Zarco, and Kohta Nozane will be on the bike, as Jonas Folger is still not fit enough to be riding.

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Analysis: The "Smart" Approach To Writing The WorldSBK Rulebook

Scott Smart was tasked with improving the show in 2018. Here the FIM Superbike Technical Director explains the thought process behind the new regulations

Scott Smart has been tasked with writing and rewriting the rule book for Superbikes around the planet. The FIM Superbike Technical Director has been instrumental in bringing about the recent regulation changes for WorldSBK, and speaking at the season ending Qatar round he explained the philosophy behind the changes.

“There's a lot of benefits to these changes but the biggest factor is that we want to find a way to have more exciting racing in WorldSBK,” explained Smart. “With the new regulations each team on the grid has the chance to run the same specification as the factory teams or to develop their own parts. This gives a private team the chance to have a bike with development work already having been completed by simply buying the relevant parts for their bike. This should improve reliability up and down the grid while also improving the quality of packages in the midfield which should improve the racing.

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Analysis: A New Dawn For WorldSBK In 2018

As winter testing begins, we take a look at the regulation changes for WorldSBK in 2018.

The opening round of the 2018 WorldSBK season may be 100 days away but the race to get ready for Phillip Island has begun in earnest. The majority of the paddock are in the south of Spain to begin winter testing at Jerez, and there is certainly a lot of work to be done.

The biggest single change in the history of the series will see widespread changes to the technical regulations. The headline act has been the introduction of mandated - and variable - rev limits for each manufacturer, in a bid to curtail the dominance enjoyed by Kawasaki and Ducati in recent years.

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2018 Provisional WorldSBK Calendar Released: Argentina, Brno Added, Jerez, Lausitzring Out

The FIM today released the provisional 2018 WorldSBK version. Just as last year, the schedule contains thirteen rounds, spread out from February to late October. Two circuits visited in 2017 are out, Jerez and the Lausitzring, while Brno makes a return to the WorldSBK schedule, and a brand new circuit in the west of Argentina, near the border with Chile.

The schedule starts as ever at Phillip Island in Australia on 25th February, with the WorldSBK and WorldSSP classes competing. As is traditional, the race is preceded a couple of days earlier by a two-day official test. The start of the series is once again rather fragmented, however, as WorldSBK fans will have to wait four weeks for the second round of the series at the Chang International Circuit in Buriram, Thailand.

The series then heads to Europe, with a back-to-back weekend at Aragon and then Assen. At Aragon, the series is joined by the WorldSSP300 and Superstock 1000 series. The Assen round is the first clash of the year, running on the same weekend as the Austin round of MotoGP at the Circuit of the Americas, but as they are running in different time zones, the races themselves will not clash.

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New WorldSBK Rules For 2018 - Will Rev Limits Transform World Superbikes?

The World Superbike championship has moved to address the performance disparities which have seen Kawasaki and Ducati dominate in recent seasons. The Superbike Commission, the rule-making body for the WorldSBK series, today announced a series of measures to ensure greater parity among teams and factories. The measures, which will enter into force in 2018, see rev limits replacing weight penalties and air restrictors as a performance balancing mechanism, and a performance-based concession point system for allowing engine updates during the season.

The changes fall into three main categories: the performance balancing system, a system of concession points, and the price capping of a range of suspension, chassis, and engine parts related to performance. The performance balancing system and the concession points system are aimed at creating more parity between different manufacturers, while the price capping of certain parts is aimed at both limiting costs, and of ensuring that all teams have access to the same parts.

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Sylvain Guintoli, Ant West To Race In Jerez

The WorldSBK grid at Jerez will be full of replacement riders, as injury takes its toll, not just on the regular riders, but also on possible replacements. Sylvain Guintoli is to step in and replace the still injured and departing Randy Krummenacher in the Kawasaki Puccetti team for the rest of the season, the Swiss rider having previously fractured his wrist. Guintoli will ride for the Puccetti team in both the remaining rounds this year, at Jerez and at Qatar.

The replacement ride is also something of an audition. Guintoli and Puccetti are believed to still be negotiating over a possibility the Frenchman could ride for them in 2018 in WorldSBK.

There is a replacement in Puccetti's WorldSSP team as well. With Kenan Sofuoglu almost certain to miss Jerez and Qatar, Ant West will be riding one of the Puccetti bikes. Leon Haslam had originally been scheduled to race Sofuoglu's bike, but the Englishman fractured an ankle in a major crash in the final race of the BSB championship at Brands Hatch this weekend. 

Below are the press releases announcing the changes:


Guintoli Joins Kawasaki Puccetti For Final WorldSBK Rounds

2014 FIM Superbike World Champion Sylvain Guintoli will join the Kawasaki Puccetti Racing Team for the final two rounds of the 2017 WorldSBK season, starting this coming weekend at Jerez de la Frontera in Spain.

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Ducati Superbike Boss Ernesto Marinelli To Leave Ducati At End Of 2017

A major surprise out of Borgo Panigale this afternoon. Ernesto Marinelli, the man behind so much of Ducati's World Superbike success, is to leave the company at the end of 2017 for pastures new.

Marinelli has been a lynchpin in Ducati's WSBK operation, working with the company for 22 years. He started as a track engineer, working with both Carl Fogarty and Neil Hodgson, but soon took on a major role in Ducati's racing operations. The Italian led Ducati's AMA racing program at the end of last century, working with such legendary riders as Troy Bayliss, Ben Bostron, Anthony Gobert, and John Kocinski. After returning to Europe, he took over the role of technical director, then project manager of Ducati's WorldSBK project.

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