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Tom's Tech Treasures: A Closer Look At Recent MotoGP Developments

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.
As Tom was not in Thailand, here are some photos of things he has noticed at recent races.


Right handlebar of Valentino Rossi's Movistar Yamaha M1
Peter Bom: Although the bike is ‘ride by wire’, Yamaha still rely on the natural feeling of Bowden cables for the rider throttle, where both Honda en Ducati have electric wires coming from the throttle housing.


Left handlebar of Valentino Rossi's Movistar Yamaha M1
Peter Bom: The small wheel in front of the handlebar is there so the rider can adjust the position of the front brake lever while riding. Riders are very sensitive to the front brake pressure point, and this might change during the first laps out as a result of the temperature changes.


Under the 'salad box', at the rear of Jack Miller's Pramac Ducati Desmosedici GP17


Suzuki GSX-RR swingarm on Andrea Iannone's bike


New aerodynamic fairing for the KTM RC16 on Pol Espargaró's bike. First appeared at Misano


Front view of the new aerodynamic fairing for the KTM RC16 on Pol Espargaró's bike. First appeared at Misano


Brembo monobloc brake calipers


Ducati GP18 carbon swingarm


Under the tank cover of a Monster Tech3 Yamaha M1


Head of a fork tube (Stefan Bradl’s Honda RC213V)


Three connectors on the front fork of a Ducati GP18, the left one goes to a (hidden) sensor that measures the acceleration of the unsprung part of the front fork, needed to judge front fork damping qualities. The middle one is connected to two (!) wheel speed sensors. Just to show you how important measuring wheel speed is, they connect two identical sensors just in case one breaks. The right-hand connector is there for the sensor that measures the temperature of the carbon brake disc using infrared. Pretty important as the carbon brakes need to be kept between 300° and 700° Celsius. Any lower and they are just not there when you need them, anything higher and they are damaged beyond repair (and they are very, very costly).


Yamaha M1 rear suspension


Honda RC213V fairing (Márquez)


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

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WorldSBK To Hold 3 Races Each Weekend In 2019 - 1 Race Saturday, 2 Races Sunday

The FIM and Dorna today announced that from 2019, the WorldSBK class will see action in three races at each event. A sprint race is to be added on Sunday morning, in addition to the two full-length races held on Saturday and Sunday. 

The addition of a sprint race will mean a revised race schedule for each WorldSBK weekend, with races moved to different time slots to make room for the races. Race 1 will be held on Saturday, as it currently is, but the start has been moved back to 2pm European time, which is the more traditional time for racing, and the slot in which MotoGP also races. On Sunday, Race 2 will be a sprint race, starting at 11am, followed by Race 3, the normal length race, at 2pm.

The realignment of the race start times will help race organizers, who felt that the racing day was too short, with many fans leaving immediately after the WorldSBK class was finished. A longer race schedule is meant to give fans more value for their ticket money. The start time shift has been made possible by the changes to the F1 schedule, which now starts their races at 3:15pm European time, opening up that 2pm slot for both WorldSBK and MotoGP.

Though the schedule switch had been widely trailed, the FIM and Dorna press release raises more questions than answers. There is no mention of how the grid is to be set for the Sunday races, for example, and whether the current format with the grid for Race 2 being set in part by the results in Race 1 will be maintained, either for Race 2, or Race 3. There is no mention of whether Race 2 will have an impact on the grid. 

More importantly - and more interestingly - there is no mention of either the duration nor the points distribution for the sprint race. We have no idea whether the current Grand Prix system - 25-20-16-13-11-10, then 1 point less for each position down to 15th place - will be maintained for the sprint race. If it is, then it would send points tallies for the season through the roof, but it would not necessarily mean that the title would decided earlier. The points differentials would be bigger, but there would still be a lot of points on the table at the end of the season, with 75 points on offer each weekend, if the system were to be maintained as it is.

There is also no word on how long a sprint race is supposed to be. At the moment, WorldSBK races are roughly 90-100km in length, so for example 21 laps of Assen. The WorldSSP300 class has races of between 50 and 60km, or 12 laps of Assen. We have no clue as to whether the WorldSBK sprint race would be longer or shorter than that. Make the race too short, and it leaves little time for riders to escape their grid positions. Make it too long and it is hard to see how the outcome would be any different to a normal race.

There is also the question of additional risk. The experience of races shortened due to red flags is that they tend to be far more hectic affairs, with riders taking more risks. Will riders take more risks, making them more likely to crash, if they  know there is a second, full length race on Sunday afternoon? That question will most likely only become apparent when the racing starts.

The reason for adding a third race is simple. Dorna is trying to increase the popularity of the series, and raise interest by making it more exciting. Whether this is the correct path or not is not immediately obvious.

The FIM / Dorna press release appears below:


Three races set to be introduced into WorldSBK race format in 2019

New era for the premier class on the horizon

Looking ahead to 2019, FIM and Dorna WSBK Organization have announced some updates to the 2019 MOTUL FIM Superbike World Championship race day schedule, which will welcome three races held over one weekend for the first time in the series history.

Sticking with the now traditional Race One on Saturday at 14.00h, this will open the weekend and will be the same duration. For the first time ever, Sunday will see the dawn of a short sprint race format at 11.00h. The weekend will conclude for the WorldSBK class with Race Three at 14.00h with usual duration, for all rounds held inside Central European Time.

Preparing for what is set to be a sensational weekend full of pure WorldSBK action, Dorna WSBK Organization and the FIM are working alongside riders, teams, manufacturers, circuits, broadcasters and sponsors to ensure the best format is decided throughout the 2019 season. Nail-biting and enthralling races will be guaranteed as we welcome the WorldSBK weekend into a brand-new era with a whole new experience for fans and viewers the world over.

Daniel Carrera, WorldSBK Executive Director explains: “To bring in a third ‘sprint race’ into the WorldSBK format for 2019 is something we have been planning for a long time now, so we are delighted to see the plans coming together. We are committed to bringing exciting races to the fans year on year, and we think the addition of a sprint race will add to the WorldSBK experience. We are continuing to work on the final adjustments and hope to bring more details in the near future.”

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Tom's Tech Treasures: A Detailed Look At What's New At Aragon

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


KTM RC 250 R engine (Moto3)
Peter Bom: This engine is tilted backwards for cleaning and maintenance. Note the (orange) caps that keep dirt out of the inlet / exhaust ports during transport and cleaning. The aluminum box on the left is the water / oil intercooler. Here, instead of using an oil cooler, the water from the radiator cools the engine oil.


Gyroscopic sensor on the Ducati fork
Peter Bom: A two-axis acceleration sensor fitted close to the wheel axle of the front fork. Measuring the acceleration forces inline with the fork, together with the suspension stroke sensors, gives the engineers a clear view of the damping qualities of the front fork. The 2nd axis measures the lateral forces that will show understeer.


Dell’Orto ECU used in Moto3 and Dorna unit used for TV
Peter Bom: Note the difference: all the ‘not so neatly’ fitted electronic boxes are there for Dorna TV coverage. Not all bikes in Moto3 have to use them, it’s the price of being successful…


Cooling system to cool down the caliper (Yamaha M1)


Aerodynamic cover on Danilo Petrucci’s Ducati GP18 front fork


Carbon swingarm on the Aprilia RS-GP. That part has been used on and off since Austria (the first time Tom Morsellino saw it)


Ventilated mudguard on the Yamaha M1, appeared at Barcelona


Honda RC213V carbon swingarm


Cooling system for the rear brake caliper (Marc Márquez)


Carbon/aluminum top triple clump on Ducati GP18


Brembo bake system (Honda RC213V)


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

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CormacGP Shoots Aragon: The Race In Spain Was Mainly On The Plain


The second half of 2018 is turning into a repeat of 2017: Dovizioso vs Marquez


Pol Espargaro was back in fine style, until he fell and rebroke his collarbone


Dark days for Movistar Yamaha at the moment


Story of the race: Jorge Lorenzo went down at Turn 1, and blamed Marc Marquez for it. Race Direction disagreed


Taka. Teammate Cal Crutchlow has fine words for Nakagami


Aragon proved that the Suzukis are closer than ever. Local boy Alex Rins lost out to Andrea Iannone, though


Head down and work. That's all Johann Zarco can do with what he has


Steady progress for stylish Jack Miller, until a gearbox issue gave him vibration


Next year on a Yamaha. Wonder what Franco Morbidelli thinks of that now?


And then there were four


Squad goals for Petrucci: lose more weight, conserve the rear tire, try to match his teammate next year


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

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FIM Withdraws Romano Fenati's Race License For Rest Of 2018 Season

In an unprecedented move, the FIM has overruled the FIM Panel of Stewards' decision at Misano to ban Romano Fenati for two races. After meeting with Fenati and his representative at FIM headquarters in Switzerland, the FIM decided to withdraw his racing license for the remainder of the 2018 season.

Fenati will now have to reapply for a racing license according to the FIM procedures if he wishes to race in 2019. Whether he will or not is unknown: after he lost his 2018 ride with the Snipers team, and the 2019 ride with the MV Agusta Forward team, Fenati announced he would retire from racing altogether. He has already had his license issued by the Italian federation FMI suspended pending further notice.

The FIM press release appears below:


FIM withdraws Romano Fenati’s licence after discussions in Mies, Switzerland

Moto2 rider Romano Fenati attended a meeting at the FIM Headquarters in Mies on Tuesday 18 September following an incident in Misano during the Moto2 race on Sunday 9 September 2018.

Mr Fenati, accompanied by his legal representative, was received by FIM President Vito Ippolito and FIM Deputy CEO and Legal Director Mr Richard Perret.

Mr Fenati was asked to explain in person his act on the track in Misano, which has given rise to many extreme reactions in the traditional media and on social media platforms.

During the meeting, the FIM representatives emphasised the Federation’s deep concern for the safety of all riders and other participants in motorcycling competitions. They also highlighted the importance it attaches to fair play in motorcycling sport. While acknowledging that riders, and in particular those who reach the highest level of the sport, are subject to many pressures both on and off the track, they reminded Mr Fenati of the profound influence high-level athletes can have on fans and young people and urged him to be mindful of his responsibility to set a positive example in future.

Following the discussion with the rider and his representative, the FIM decided to withdraw

Mr. Fenati’s FIM licence until the end of the current calendar year. A new FIM licence for the 2019 season may be granted to him subject to the conditions laid down in the FIM Regulations.

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CormacGP Shoots Misano - Racing Beauty On The Rimini Riviera

Another new feature on the site starting this week. After every round of MotoGP, the immensely talented Cormac Ryan Meenan of CormacGP will be supplying a selection of photographs from that weekend's event. If you'd like to see more of his work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.


Flying on Friday and Saturday, but when the grip went, so did Maverick Viñales' chances of a podium


Miller Time


Alvaro Bautista reflects on his performance


Marc Marquez gets physical


Jorge Lorenzo came to Misano with a plan. But Andrea Dovizioso had a better plan


"The best bike on the grid". The universal verdict on Ducati after Misano


A race in Italy means a special helmet for Valentino Rossi. But only us old hands can remember the movie this one was based on


Speed thrills


A good result for Dani Pedrosa, but a long way back from the front group


Peek-a-boo


Next year's bike will be easier, Franco


A happy man, is Paolo Ciabatti


If you'd like to have high resolution versions (4K) of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

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Tom's Tech Treasures: Up Close With MotoGP Bikes At Misano

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with technical explanations of the details. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, while readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos.


Thumb rear brake lever on Jorge Lorenzo’s Ducati GP18


Aerodynamic (large version) fairing used at Misano on Andrea Iannone's Suzuki GSX-RR


Stefan Bradl’s Honda RC213V used at Misano, probably the 2019 version with a curved radiator


Rear tyre temperature sensors on the KTM RC16 (Pol Espargaro)


Battery of the KTM Moto2 bike


Ride-by-wire throttle on Stefan Bradl’s RC213V. Throttle position is measured electronically, and sent to ECU to operate butterflies


Danilo Petrucci’s front fork with the two brakes temperature sensors (small red sensor behind suspension reservoir)


A mysterious part underneath the front of the fairing on Michele Pirro's Ducati GP18. Could it be a ballast weight?


6-axis accelerometer (Suzuki GSX-RR) that provides gives accurate information on lateral grip. This also helps to be more precise for vibration analysis and grip loss detection.


Yamaha M1 electronics connector "hub" with wheel speed (SPD), suspension travel (SUS), brake temperature (BRK) and a fourth connector, with a cable marked TB


If you'd like to have full-size versions of these technical photos, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

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From Bad To Worse: Romano Fenati Loses Racing License, Summoned To FIM

Things are going poorly for Romano Fenati. His actions during Sunday's Moto2 race at Misano, when he reached over and squeezed Stefano Manzi's front brake, are having far-reaching repercussions. 

On Sunday, the FIM Panel of Stewards penalized Fenati with a two-race ban. On Monday morning, he was sacked from his current Moto2 ride by the Marinelli Snipers Racing Team. On Monday afternoon, he also lost his 2019 ride with the MV Agusta Forward Racing Team. 

More was to come on Tuesday. First, the Italian motorcycle federation FMI revoked Fenati's racing license for all sporting activities in Italy. This also renders him ineligible to compete in any international or world championship events, as international racing licenses are also issued by the national federation, which in Fenati's case is the FMI. He has been invited to a hearing on 14th September, at which he will have the right to representation by a lawyer.

Then, the FIM, the international motorcycling federation, summoned Fenati to the FIM headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, to explain his actions. In a press release, shown below, FIM president Vito Ippolito summoned Fenati to the FIM to here his side of the story, before considering further action against the Italian.

This seems outside of the normal course of events for disciplinary proceedings. Fenati could be referred directly to the FIM's highest court the International Disciplinary Court (CDI). If issued a penalty by the CDI, Fenati would have two more avenues for appeal. 

It may not come to that. Today, Fenati told the Italian paper Il Resto Del Carlino that he intended to withdraw from racing, at least for the foreseeable future. He would complete his studies, and perhaps go and work in his grandmother's hardware store.  He accepted his error - "I did the stupidest thing of my life" he told Il Resto Del Carlino - but insisted his intention had not been to harm Stefano Manzi. 

Fenati had received death threats since the incident, he said. The press coverage of the incident had been overwhelming, even making the evening news in countries in which motorcycle racing is a niche sport. That coverage, and the outrage generated in online echo chambers, had whipped up some individuals so far as to make threats against Fenati's life.

Whatever the outcome of the FIM hearings, Fenati's racing career is at best on hold for a period of years rather than months, and at worst, finished permanently.

The FIM press release appears below:


The FIM summons Moto2 Rider Romano Fenati to FIM HQ

Following the incident in the Misano round of the FIM Moto2 Grand Prix World Championship on Sunday 9 September involving Moto2 rider Romano Fenati, the FIM President has summoned the Italian rider to the FIM Headquarters in Mies (Switzerland) to explain his conduct.

In view of the egregious and shocking nature of Mr Fenati’s act, the FIM took the time needed to reflect serenely on the incident, which has prompted strong emotions throughout the world of motorcycling and beyond.

The FIM has decided to summon the Rider to FIM HQ (Switzerland) in order to discuss the situation with him before taking any action the FIM may consider appropriate.

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Bradley Smith To Become Aprilia MotoGP Test Rider

As the Silly Season for riders is almost complete, the test rider market is starting to take shape. The first official announcement came today, as Aprilia announced that Bradley Smith will be taking on a role as test rider for the MotoGP project for the Italian factory.

Smith had told the media yesterday that he felt like he still had work left to do in the MotoGP paddock. "At the end of the day I feel like I have a lot to offer," Smith said. "Also I’m not done. When you’re not done, the motivation is high. I’ve said before I want to be back inside this paddock full-time in 2020. The motivation is high to help the whole project and ride well myself and put myself in the shop window. As long as that’s managed in the right way in the team structure, it’s certainly not a negative thing to be [a test rider]. Having wildcards available is always a good incentive for the rider and also a good incentive for the project. Everyone pushes on and pushes forward." 

Smith had also been in the running for the job of test rider inside Yamaha's new European test team, but that option disappeared during the British GP. "In Silverstone the final nail in the coffin came from Lin Jarvis when he said there would be no British rider as a test rider," Smith said. With Smith out of contention there, that means that Jonas Folger is almost certain to take the role with Yamaha as test rider.

Suzuki will have Sylvain Guintoli working as a test rider for them next year, while Michele Pirro will continue at Ducati. Mika Kallio will return with KTM, though the Austrian factory are also trying to persuade Dani Pedrosa to take on a role alongside Kallio. Stefan Bradl is likely to return with HRC as test rider. At Ducati, Casey Stoner is leaving the Italian factory at the end of the season, though there is no sign of whether he wishes to continue as a test rider.

The Aprilia press release appears below:


BRADLEY SMITH TEST RIDER FOR THE APRILIA MOTOGP PROJECT

Aprilia's home GP at Misano Adriatico is also the chance for an important formalisation. MotoGP rider Bradley Smith will join the Aprilia Test Team for 2019 and will also compete astride the RS-GP in a series of wild cards during next season. The arrival of the British rider, runner-up 125 champion in 2009 on Aprilia, is part of the racing department's reorganisation and reinforcing process to consolidate the Aprilia MotoGP project.

Bradley Smith, born in 1980, took his first steps in motorcycle racing at a very young age in motocross, later making his début in the single-brand Aprilia Superteens where he was quickly in the limelight. He moved up to the 125 World Championship class in 2006, taking his first podium finish the following year. He was then runner-up champion in the category in 2009, whereas in 2011 and 2012 he raced in the intermediate Moto2 class. In his MotoGP experience, begun in 2013, he has finished twice on the podium and taken a series of top 10 placements. His trophy collection also includes one from the prestigious Suzuka 8 Hours, won in 2015.

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2019 MotoGP Line Up Nearly Complete: Karel Abraham Signs 2-Year Deal With Avintia

The 2019 MotoGP grid is now as good as complete. Today, the Reale Avintia squad announced they have signed a two-year contract with Karel Abraham which will see him racing a Ducati for the team for the next two seasons.

The announcement had been widely expected. Xavier Simeon has not lived up to expectations and failed to adapt to MotoGP, and Avintia were looking for a replacement. Abraham had been left without a team after the Aspar / Angel Nieto Team passed their grid slots to the Petronas Yamaha team, which had already signed riders for the coming season. Abraham needed a team, and Avintia needed a rider who could bring money, to replace the money lost when Simeon departed.

Though formally, there are two seats still officially without a contracted rider - the second Reale Avintia seat, and the second LCR Honda seat - those rides are already taken. Tito Rabat will stay on for another year at Avintia, once he returns from his serious injury picked up at Silverstone, and Taka Nakagami will extend his contract with LCR Honda. All that is needed is the official confirmation.

The 2019 MotoGP rider line up appears below. 

2019 and beyond
Rider Bike Contract through
Movistar Yamaha
Valentino Rossi Yamaha M1 2020
Maverick Viñales Yamaha M1 2020
 
Repsol Honda
Marc Márquez Honda RC213V 2020
Jorge Lorenzo Honda RC213V 2020
 
Ecstar Suzuki
Alex Rins Suzuki GSX-RR 2020
Joan Mir Suzuki GSX-RR 2020
 
Gresini Aprilia
Aleix Espargaro Aprilia RS-GP 2020
Andrea Iannone Aprilia RS-GP 2020
 
KTM Factory
Johann Zarco KTM RC16 2020
Pol Espargaro KTM RC16 2020
 
Factory Ducati
Andrea Dovizioso Ducati GP19 2020
Danilo Petrucci Ducati GP19 2019
 
Pramac Ducati
Pecco Bagnaia Ducati GP19? 2020
Jack Miller Ducati GP19 2019
 
LCR Honda
Cal Crutchlow Honda RC213V 2020
Takaaki Nakagami Honda RC213V 2019?
 
Tech3 KTM
Miguel Oliveira KTM RC16 2019
Hafizh Syahrin KTM RC16 2019
 
Petronas SIC Yamaha
Franco Morbidelli Yamaha M1 (factory) 2019
Fabio Quartararo Yamaha M1 (satellite) 2019
 
Avintia Ducati
Karel Abraham Ducati GP18 2020
Tito Rabat Ducati GP18 2019?

The Avintia press release appears below:


Reale Avintia Racing is pleased to announce a two-year agreement reached with Karel Abraham that will see the 28 year-old Czech rider will compete in MotoGP World Championship with Ducati in 2019 and 2020.

Karel Abraham’s debut in the World Championship was in 2005 in 125cc and after two seasons he moved up to 250cc. In 2010, the same year the Moto2 class started as the new intermediate category, Abraham did a strong season and he ended the year with a podium finish in Japan and wining the race in Valencia.

His debut in MotoGP was in 2011 with Ducati and he completed five seasons before moving to World Superbike. Abraham came back to MotoGP in 2017 and he showed his skills at the Grand Prix of Argentina with front row start and top 10 result in the race.

Karel is a very experienced rider and capable of scoring points in every race. Next season he will race with Reale Avintia Racing team riding a Ducati GP18 and he expects to step forward and get closer to the front.

Karel Abraham

“I’m very happy to continue in Motogp next year and would like to thanks for this opportunity to Reale Avintia Racing Team. We signed in Silverstone because it was very important for me to finalise every detail of the contract in order to get competitive machinery. This worked out also thanks to a big help of Luigi Dall’Igna and Paolo Ciabatti from Ducati factory. The important part is, that it will be Ducati GP18 with the newest specification, which has a good results from this season. Thanks to that I believe, that we will be able to make some really good results and I am already very excited about the next season.”

Raúl Romero | CEO Esponsorama

“I’m very happy to see Karel Abraham joining our team. He is a hard worker, has won in Moto2, and has a lot of experience in MotoGP and with Ducati. I think that with better material and with the work of the whole team, next year Karel will be able to show its true potential. And I’m also happy to announce that we will continue with Ducati for two more seasons.”

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