Recent comments

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   6 days 22 hours ago

    What part of the following is difficult to understand?
    " . . years of racing and crashing have left him battered and bruised, the massive crash at Suzuka only making matters worse. . . . he couldn't turn his neck to the left properly to look behind him. He also has a recurrent back problem . . . hospitalized with kidney problems . . "

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   6 days 23 hours ago

    sounds like ducati really know what they are doing now, it's great to have a working partnership like that with stoner

    and i think stoner will only be more valuable and knowledgeable as a rider in the long run, whether he races again or not, it's still a very intelligent investment from his standpoint.

    you can't say for many GP rider who have extensive testing experience as an "engineer rider" like the way he puts it. he will only get better, and if he ever decide to get back on the saddle, can't even imagine the possibilities

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   6 days 23 hours ago

    I think being relevant to the Ducati Motogp effort is important to him. That is the problem with most retirements. Losing your sense of relevance... Plus I believe him when he says he wants to dig into each step taken to improve the motorcycle. He wants to truly understand each step and its impact on the racing machine. He said he would have liked to have been an engineer. Come to think of it, he seemed to be pretty engineer-like when he was racing. He even used slightly different lines. Particularly at Indy! This seems to me like a pretty good gig for him. He's got his world titles and he earned them with rare style. Now he wants to help Gigi create a title contending motorcycle for the two Andrea's. Its puts him at another level. A new special challenge. And he gets to have fun doing it.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   6 days 23 hours ago

    I'm entirely convinced that Rossi will retire before leaving Yamaha. His 2 years at Ducati showed him he's too close to the end of his career to take any more chances.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   6 days 23 hours ago

    I believe Casey saying he doesn't have an interest in returning to racing. Results from testing could have a slight influence but doubt it to be enough to sway him. For these ego's of such Aliens, to know where you place amongst some of your past rivals after so many years would be one of the greatest 'wonderings' without the pains of full time racing. Casey is a smart man in a prime position.

    Casey obviously has a strong desire and feels he has the abilities to provide input that can make a positive difference to a team. He is getting from Ducati what Honda wouldn't accommodate.

    Anyone else in the Duc paddock that has an issue with Casey's presence is unfortunately their problem. Do what your employed to do or die.

    Early days with teams and riders yet to sort out heads and machines without needing to make too many judgements on who, what, where.

    Maybe the talented, likeable, approachable yet to achieve all things capable bloke has yearnings for a higher position! I hope so.

    One thing is for certain........I'm absolutely loving the blokes presence!

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   6 days 23 hours ago

    "All riders have rather large egos (a prerequisite for convincing yourself that going round in circles faster than others is in some way important),"maybe was a best wise and hilarious words to describe a human being doing such type of stuff. This sentence could have been written by a psychologist of high knowledge, so congrats for sharing all that analysis.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   6 days 23 hours ago

    There's a rule allowing only 2 riders on a factory team.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 1 hour ago

    Honda excuse not to let Stoner race was curious at best, now it is clearly unbelievable.
    Ok, saying "Stoner might not be up to pace" and hiring Aoyama was a little strange...but now seeing Stoner laptimes on the Ducati the whole thing is absolutely laughable.
    I'm not into conspiracy theories, but now I understand why Stoner thought Marquez might have vetoed his return.
    I'm glad he's enjoying life (in the paddock) again, he's smiling on every picture, hoping to see him for a couple wildcards.
    Honestly not seeing him wildcard at Phillip Island would be a huge letdown for most MotoGP fans.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 2 hours ago

    Mat once said something to the effect of: the reason test riders are shit is that if you were good enough to race at the highest level, you'd have a top level seat.

    Now, pretend you are a factory looking to improve. Who is the most valuable asset you can hire? A champion, who is still fast, and can give feedback.

    Who cares if Casey comes back? I want him to, but that speculation is silly right now.

    What matters more than anything is Ducati getting their collective act together and fielding a competitive ride with a competitive rider.

    I saw somewhere that Ducati want Casey to prove the bike is rideable, which makes landing Lorenzo easier. The knock on the Ducati is that only Casey could ride it fast. He is further proving that point. You could not get two styles more divergent than JL and CS. MM and CS yes, but JL doesn't ride the bike the same way. That was one of the theories about why Ducati wanted Nicky - dirt track background. It's likely why they took Crazy Joe Iannone.

    I went searching for the source material for my Mladin quote: http://www.superbikeplanet.com/2014/Nov/141120stonerad.htm

    Turns out Dean had the same ideas as I did...maybe I'm not so original after all. :)

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 2 hours ago

    Casey is still an alien and Dovi won't be back next year. Ducati will put on a full court press to sign an alien during this silly season. And don't fool yourselves into believing it cannot be Vale. With a renewed focus on winning by new Ducati management, and proof by Casey that this bike can work, Rossi may see this as a chance to redeem himself.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 3 hours ago

    Stoner is a beautiful rider, esp. his use of the rear brake to manage engine torque and weight distribution (I personally believe that this was at least part of his secret), and his battles with Rossi in 2008 and 2009 especially were terrific. However, I believe him when he says he doesn't want to race - I don't know the guy mind you - and I'll tell you why.

    Stoner clearly enjoys racing, and riding the motorcycle. However MotoGP is not just racing and not just riding the motorcycle; it is a year-long grind on-track and off-track. Occasionally participating in an activity and being under contract to always do that activity, on-demand, are two very, very different things. Heck, I like waxing my car every month or so. Three times a day, on-demand? A very different proposition.

    Everyone is different, and Stoner doesn't "need" MotoGP the way, say, Rossi needs it. Rossi loves everything about it - for him, it's a pleasure, not a grind. Stoner could do a wild-card, and obviously likes testing - but I doubt he wants to be a contract racer.

    In American football you see this all the time, but because there are 2,000 players at any given time you don't notice it as much. Two high-profile examples are Barry Sanders, who quit much like Stoner, with a lot left in the tank, and Jerry Rice, who played twenty seasons and would have played 30 if he could have.

    Will Stoner do a race? Sure, it seems possible. Will Stoner return to MotoGP? Highly unlikely.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 5 hours ago

    Loving the fact everyone's talking about a former world champs return to ride. Love or hate him, it's a much welcome distraction to the muck that was the end of last season. Really wish he would come back, but I'll settle for him trying to help get another manufacter get to the pointy end. Really hope the Andreas improve on last year and get a win.

  • Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Why Honda never take the easy road   1 week 5 hours ago

    I fully agree with Mat. Honda is leader, not a follower, and because of that they are the most winningest brand in WGP, and by far. So...

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 5 hours ago

    I would love to see him return to racing. The more fast riders, the better, and IMO there is no one faster. I was never the biggest Stoner fan when he was racing in MotoGP (I must admit to rooting for VR46 at the time), but I always respected his immense talent, and it was a pleasure watching him ride.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 6 hours ago

    David excellent article as always, just a question regarding rulebook, based on hypothetical situation:

    Let's say Stoner does a WC race already at Qatar and wins it ... any chance for Ducati to promote him to "full rider" for the rest of the season?

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 6 hours ago

    Machine's comment sums up my take.
    Casey may or may not do a wildcard here,there or anywhere. At this stage of the game it has been left in the air by Gigi for all the right reasons pertaining to Corse's GP effort. Stoner's data collection for the GP16 development using the GP15 is invaluable.
    Give the two Andrea's a break. They are sitting in#26&93 land with the new bike.
    Redding, Barbera, Petrux, Hernandez and Casey were at Sepang on machinery that already has a proven base to work with.
    Sepang 2 will be more interesting and will be a race between Suzuki, Ducati, Honda and Yamaha's engineering staff on display rather than racer's or test riders, based on data collection.
    Then of course Michelin.
    Anyway, Stoner is the ultimate asset as a test rider for any team and Repsol/HRC under-utilized him last year to their detriment.
    I am relishing the thought of Stoner proving to Corse that the winglets are trash, for aesthetic reasons if nothing else.
    That is ugly stuff and even Rossi says so in the Yamaha camp.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 6 hours ago

    Maybe Dovizioso is not too happy mainly because the second part of last season was not too good for him and as an athlete/racer when you start having doubts it's difficult to overcome the insecurities when you're being compared to a bright shining star with nothing to lose. On the other hand I think that Stoner presence might boost iannone's fighting spirit: worst case scenario is behind CS in some races it would not be the end of the world. I'm not in their heads but this is my strong feeling.
    Another interesting piece of speculation: I read that Lin Jarvis said that Ducati has been courting Lorenzo really hard. if this is true and JL does join Ducati next year I'm not sure he'll get along with Iannone.... just a gut feeling no proof here. And of course they are professionals and work for their employer. One thing for sure: if Stoner wants a shot at racing again he needs to let his wish known asap: with all contracts expiring all the major teams are already making moves to secure the big names.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 7 hours ago

    When Stoner retired, some people said that Honda were paying him, to not sign with another factory, as a test rider. He seemed to enjoy that first year doing it. Fizzled a bit after that. If you were him, Why not be a test rider with benefits ? Why not do Motogp part time lol ? Good ego boost too, surrounded by press, while the factory riders are back at the hotel...

  • Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Why Honda never take the easy road   1 week 8 hours ago

    Great article by Powervalve58. In particular, his comment on firing orders for V4s...

    "By the way, these numbers apply for a 90-degree V4 with a 180-degree crankshaft, where the firing intervals are 180-90-180-270 degrees. With a 360-degree crankshaft it is normally 90-270-90-270 degrees, so two long intervals and two short ones. This was the case with the Honda RC30 (and still is with the Pan-European) and that gives a deeper, more regular sounding drone."

    My memory is very short-lived, but I do seem to recall that - back in the late 1980s - the RC30 was known for that 360-degree 'drone' noise while the VFR-750F (& later) had a 180-degree "Rr-Rr-Rr" noise (if you follow!).

    Both great bikes. Wish I still had my VFR!

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 8 hours ago

    At first, around 24 hours ago, when i read the wednesday roundup. I thought, damn why the heck stoner wouldn't want to race again. It is definitely nice to know you still got it, beat quite a lot of people time with much less training or preparation, also make quite a lot of people scared of your presence. Then just about now, when my objectivity start to overcome my excitement i realized that he wouldn't back as a full time rider. Why? It's just simply too demanding for him. Full time rider means almost 20 races a year, how much energy of travelling and preparation needed, and all that media activity at every race, more importantly is his family especially he looked to be really enjoyed his time with his daughter. So, i doubt he would come back as a full time rider. But a few wildcards won't hurt him :)

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 8 hours ago

    Stoner is contracted to test.
    Dovizioso and Iannone are contracted to race.

    I'd be surprised if Dovi signed a contract that he can't enforce, having been there before.

    Gigi has already said that if Stoner asked for a wild-card they'd probably accommodate him, but that it's not why they hired him, and it's not in either of their plans. I'd be surprised if he asks.

    My own guess of the Honda no-race episode was that Casey wanted to test Honda and find out exactly where he stood with them, after it had become clear he was no longer being used as a test-rider. Once his offer was declined, he knew that someone was blocking him, and I don't doubt he knew who that was, and where it was leading to - time to start seeing what's available.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 9 hours ago

    Ducati cannot afford to upset their factory riders?

    they upset them with signing Casey. Then they upset them letting Casey ridie in official test. Casey took upseting even further. And finished as fastest Ducati. I am shure that both Andreas are very very upset.

    Honda tried not to upset Marc. So they let Stoner go. Ducati rattled the cage. Hard.

  • Casey Stoner's Ducati MotoGP Test - Your Questions Answered   1 week 9 hours ago

    Well, I don't think I completely agree to your reasoning...
    To me he seems perfectly happy just doing laps on test days. The reason he wants to go testing while others are there is first and foremost: track conditions. It has been stated over and over, when these bikes go round and round the conditions improve: temperature, debris, rubber laid down, ...
    I don't think he necessarily wants to ride in front of an audience, he mostly wants to be away from all these press conferences et al.
    He genuinely wanted to substitute for Dani and felt underused by Honda, kudos for him leaving.

  • 2016 Sepang MotoGP Test Wednesday Round Up: What We Learned So Far   1 week 9 hours ago

    What David was saying is that they want a proven alien. Vinales is nowhere even close.
    Doesn't mean he can't be one day, but he's got a long way to go.

  • 2016 Sepang MotoGP Test Wednesday Round Up: What We Learned So Far   1 week 10 hours ago

    Dear Tack & others,

    I didn't mean to imply that Stoner's feedback was useless. But we have 2 examples in the 4 stroke era where he came into a team and won the 1st year after the bike had not won a title for several years: Ducati (never), Honda (since Rossi left). I also agree that the Ducati now is a very different beast from 2007-2010. It's also great that the team appear to be listening to him, but what one sees in the garage today is no different from what one saw and heard almost 10 years ago. Great that the management is different -- clearly the bike is better.

    Why do I think they want him back? Certainly he will give good feedback -- hopefully. We don't know if he actually will or not, regardless of what people say today, only time will tell. I don't agree with those statements that his feedback was useful back in the winning days of Ducati. However, he has brought a huge amount of positive attention to the Ducati garage. He's the only WC on a modern Ducati, and won on the Honda as well. It could be as David and others have written elsewhere: he 'proves' the Ducati is a possible winner. They may be correct that Ducati will be able to tempt the likes of Lorenzo or Pedrosa because of what they see Stoner do, but I would say the temptation comes from the performance of Iannoni last year more than Stoner today. Stoner may give some confidence that the bike is more rideable than when Rossi rode the beast, but I think it's the factory riders (and of course Petrucci's performance in the wet at Silverstone) that have turned heads the most.

    But I state it again: I would absolutely love to see Stoner back on the bike at Phillip Island. Lets hope that the Ducati give him the opportunity that Honda would not and that he takes it, regardless of the factory riders sensibilities late in the season.

    --mike

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