Recent comments

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    Man, there are a few laughable posters on this thread!

    First off, Stoner has put up with bad press for years, yes he mentioned it in his interview but so what? ...He's mentioned it before (especially in Australia) and just got on with it.
     
    The thing that's made the difference is the bikes....or the direction of the bikes. He wants to race prototypes. He has never raced a production based bike (on tarmac) and has absolutly no interest in them.
     
    Secondly ....he will be forgotten? WTF? ...what century are these posters living in?....Go to YouTube and type in "motorcycle drifting" or "MotoGP slide" and see how many film clips there are of Stoner on there. Even better, select "MotoGP Drifting 2007 or 2008 or 2009 or 2010" and his are the ONLY clips you will get. His Red Bull "1000 frames per second" clip got 300,000 hits in the first 5 days
  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    Ditto (@ pagik and wosideg posts)

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    wosideg. I couldn't agree more. No, really, I couldn't. The MSMA are to blame (IMO) for the mess that Moto GP got itself into. They are the ones that pushed for all the technology, which drove up the prices of everything. And yes, Dorna should've grown some balls and taken the manufacturers to task over it. But they didn't. So shame on all of them imo. Who are the ones that suffered? Oh yeah, that's right, the paying public.......

    Nice darts..........

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP FP2 Result: Stoner's Reign Continues   3 years 1 week ago

    Looks like I will have to go to France next year ...

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP FP2 Result: Stoner's Reign Continues   3 years 1 week ago

    See how you need to come to France next year?? ;)

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    "The events of 2009 merely confirmed the fans' and the media's perception of Stoner" .

    This would read far better as 'sections of the fans....' I and many others have never felt this way about young Mr Stoner. For me he was a star the moment he slung a leg over a 250 for the first time. Over riding the thing everywhere and crashing lots but at the same time flat out fast. You just knew then this kid was going somewhere big.

    Even though you covered it nicely later in the article with "The truth is that Casey Stoner was never forgiven for the cardinal sin of beating Valentino Rossi in a straight fight." Which is ultimately the source of all the baseless, juvenile, vitriolic words and personal jibes of the so called 'fans' of the sport, that have been regurgitated ad nauseam over the years. Congratulations little 46'ers, aided and abetted by large sections of the media you've done your tiny little bit in bringing a premature end to Casey Stoners career. A bit of a nose / face spiting effort though I must say if you really are 'fans of the sport'.

  • Casey Stoner Explains His Decision To Retire To The Press At Le Mans   3 years 1 week ago

    We're convicts, we don't like attention, it makes stealing more difficult...

  • Casey Stoner Explains His Decision To Retire To The Press At Le Mans   3 years 1 week ago

    I think it's probably more the old Ducati-attitude of "STFU and ride, we know what's best and no, you won't be getting any new parts".
    This, and all the "traction control kid" BS.

  • Casey Stoner's Statement on His Retirement: "The Sport Has Changed, And I've Lost The Passion For It"   3 years 1 week ago

    Please read David's Thursday roundup.

  • Casey Stoner's Statement on His Retirement: "The Sport Has Changed, And I've Lost The Passion For It"   3 years 1 week ago

    From a purely selfish point of view I'm sad to read that Casey Stoner will be retiring at the end of the year. As so many others have said, his talent is all but unique and he's the current benchmark in MotoGP and therefore roadracing.

    Someone (I forget who - sorry) suggested that bike racing fans tend to support the riders that most closely match their own personal character, as percieved from the couch via the medium of TV generally. I empathise with Stoner's no nonsense approach to racing and I really appreciate the thought he gives in interviews to describing his racing rather than just trotting our the standard PR guff like so many riders. Motomatters has of course given us several opportunities for Stoner to give us invaluable insights into his racing for which I know we're all very grateful.

    I think it's unfair to dislike Stoner for his less than perfect personality. Should we really expect the world's best racer to be a comedian, raconteur, celebrity etc as well? To get that good at bike racing must require such dedication that you miss out on developing the rest of your skills to some extent. I'll take a racer talking racing over a racer talking sponsor-speak or bland PR any day of the week.

    I think most of us would agree that Soner is a fish out of water in the public eye. Unfortunately he seems to feel (or actually be) pressured into media exposure and commenting on issues that others are much better placed to speak on. He's clearly not the most eloquent of people, probably for the reasons stated above; but he has unfortunatley commented probably more than he should on matters where he would have been better staying silent: racing in Japan after the tsunami, CRT bike politics etc. Doohan, who Stoner openly admires, disliked the press and PR as well. I seem to remember that he compromised his earning potential by stipulating that he would severely limit his time spent doing PR. It's a shame that Stoner didn't have a mentor to advise him on such matters - maybe David could comment please?

    It will be dissapointing to see MotoGP technology stifled by CRT-type rules and lower budgets but in all liklihood the best riders in the world will still compete. A possible side benefit might be that there are fewer "casual" fans, less PR twaddle, less inane rumours and prattle and above all less fan verbal hooliganism. In which case it's really not all bad.....

    Apologies if the last paragraph seems gloomy but the pinnacle of the sport has just lost its point.

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    At some stage, once Stoner has had a couple more kids, fished for a few more Barra, raced V8 super car and so forth. He's only 26, he could easily decide in 5 years that he'd like another crack if especially if the rules are more palatable to him. Then he could jump on a Yam win another titlE or two and be the only rider to ever take the title on 3 different bikes and the only rider to ever won the title on a Ducati. here's bloody hoping, Stoners talent is unmatched in the field and probably only equalled by 1 or 2 ever.

    Great article by the way, though I would have said most people realized well before 2010 that Stoner was a talent of epic proportions. 2011 merely confirmed it.

  • Casey Stoner's Statement on His Retirement: "The Sport Has Changed, And I've Lost The Passion For It"   3 years 1 week ago

    Who can we feed on next? Who can we belittle and degrade with our comments? You don't have to sing praises for the guy, but you don't have to call him names, and cast aspersions to his character.
    If you disagree with something he says or has said, keep it specific, cite examples if you can. Give others an opportunity to refute your claim. We try and use facts to form our own opinion, rather than blindly following whoever shouts loudest. That's what football (of any flavour) is for.
    This kind of "fandom" does not belong in this sport.

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    Now imagine 10 years of having "GOAT" interjected into every conversation by a bunch of yellow clad sycophantic clowns.

  • Casey Stoner Explains His Decision To Retire To The Press At Le Mans   3 years 1 week ago

    And I say that with all respect.
    I know you can be a Kiwi or an Aussie and feel like an alien in Europe (whatever euro country). Anyone can understand the different cultures and barriers within that, sometimes to the point where one may simply struggle to fit. Sometimes more, other times less (any western country citizen visiting Japan or India -and vice versa- knows what I'm talking about).

    The bit that is getting extremely annoying is constantly seeing mentioned -more often than not- this general "labelling" of Europeans, by Aussies/Kiwis, as all being arrogant, pompous and "such and such" type of people, be it in sports or in general.
    And this silly mindset is not contrived to MotoMatters, MCN or Crash.Net user messages, I should say.
    It's that atitude that paints the situation that you're blaming on others.

    For those of you with such tendency, you're missing the big point. Europe is a continent, and it's the "old continent" exactly because there's inumerous countries and respective cultures hundreds (thousands?) years old all over it. All very different.
    If you're such a patriot, then respect other people's patriotism and cultures.
    Please stop inventing preconceptions and generalizing what you obviously don't have a clue about - no reason to have a chip on your shoulder, or using Casey Stoner as a flag to represent that.

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    I'm a genius and a psychic.

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP FP1 Result: Stoner Takes Charge   3 years 1 week ago

    A good suggestion, but one that I think is drawing a false comparison. The weather is never comparable between two weekends, and the state of the track can differ massively. Even if the weather is similar, the amount of rubber on the track from previous events - either cars or bikes, or nothing at all - can make the comparisons fairly meaningless.

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago
    0K

    I also believe that Stoner was about 95% decided on retiring at the start of the season. I believe the timing for announcement is right. The decision to retire was obviously already made​​, now Stoner has less pressure on him (in every way), and now Honda can start looking for his replacement in time.

    I think that Jorge Lorenzo will be Honda's first choice!

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago
    0K

    I also believe that Stoner was about 95% decided on retiring at the start of the season. I believe the timing for announcement is right. The decision to retire was obviously already made​​, now Stoner has less pressure on him (in every way), and now Honda can start looking for his replacement in time.

    I think that Jorge Lorenzo will be Honda's first choice!

  • 2012 Le Mans Moto2 FP1 Result: Luthi Leads From Corsi And Marquez   3 years 1 week ago

    Already a pattern seems to be emerging and unless there is a number of wet or damp races it seems the 2012 champion will be from the current top 6 riders. Shame to see Tech 3 down in midfield, hardly an auspicious start to the season and if Bradley hopes to make it to the MotoGp grid next year he's going to have to do rather better than his current form or there will be pressure to keep him down a class for another year.

    Even though his teamate is in a similar position, that's not a good enough excuse for a potential MotoGP rider.

    Stoner's retirement of course throws out some interesting scenarios for 2013, but let's not get carried away.

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP FP1 Result: Stoner Takes Charge   3 years 1 week ago

    David,

    A suggestion: Please list equivalent lap times from the previous season. This would give us a interesting comparison on where the bikes are - whether they've made progress or have gone backwards. I suspect Honda have gone backwards in terms of lap times; due in part to the rule changes that disadvantaged them.

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    "And why does he hate his media commitments quite so vehemently? The truth is that Casey Stoner was never forgiven for the cardinal sin of beating Valentino Rossi in a straight fight."

    Spot on David.

    Donninton 2007 & 2008 were prime examples of disgraceful behaviours from the crowd towards him- for no apparent reason other than beating Rossi.

    Rossi supporters - fans and media continues to assassinate Stoner's character to this day. Some of the disgraceful posts in this particular blog are further examples.

    From the BBC:
    -----------------------------
    But he has repeatedly encountered hostility from sections of the British public, and does not know why.

    "What do they want? Are they here to watch racing? It's not the right way to come to a race track," he said.

    "Then I got up on the stage at the Riders for Health charity day and everybody booed me, so I don't really want to do that again.
    "And even going round after the race, I had a 40 or 50-year-old lady giving me a boo sign and another guy making obscene gestures."
    ------------------------------

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    ... When starting out as a fan. Then you dig up old footage, and your mind is blown...

  • Casey Stoner Announces Retirement At End of 2012 Season   3 years 1 week ago

    Where to start...
    '...isn't going to get things he wants.'
    ?? He has two (maybe three) WCs and if he wanted, more would be in the books.
    '...come off to many of the rest of us as...'
    Many of the rest might be less than you think. Stats please.
    '...sufficiently slagged off Ducati...'
    Feels to me he's always kept it fair and clean. Quotes please.
    '...even looks unhappy announcing his leaving.'
    You don't think this is a very emotional step for him? You'd find it more logical would he be laughing about his retirement?
    '...his time on the Ducati resulted in a machine that worked for no one but him...'
    I am not even going to comment on this 'insight'.

    Really...

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP Thursday Round Up: On Casey Stoner's Retirement   3 years 1 week ago

    Riding a bike in MotoGP is a job, Stoner does not like it anymore so he quits. This is hardly surpsing. We all try to quit or change our job when we do not like it. What is a bit more surprising is why he does not like his job anymore. In a nutshell, Stoner seems to be still looking at having a job as an unbearable side effect of having fun. For this reason, he sees no reason and no duty to manage the unavoidable doses of pressure, nastiness and pettiness that every job with a multi-million salary entails.

    On these bases, I would not be too surprised by a sudden change of heart and even less by an early comeback. Life catches up and when the train hits, working and having fun acquire a new balance. If he will not have managed to find a new way to be among the best, possibly with much less risk and in a smaller or more anonymous circus, he will be right back. I am looking forward to that day because the kid has an enormous raw talent and I would love to watch him grown up into a proper champion.

  • 2012 Le Mans MotoGP FP1 Result: Stoner Takes Charge   3 years 1 week ago

    And to think we only have another 15 rounds to witness this type of brilliance to come out of the pits and go bang chase that lap time down boys cause i can do that all weekend long no matter what setting.

GTranslate