Recent comments

  • 2012 Assen World Superbike and World Supersport Press Release Preview Round Up   2 years 49 weeks ago

    Why do riders say things like "we had a crash" (quote Leon Haslam, but they all do it), instead of "I had a crash".

    I can understand extending the compliment if they're saying "we did very well" like as a team but hang on, YOU had the bloody crash! They even say things like "we were late on the brakes"; who else is riding the bike, they don't have pillions do they?

    Casey Stonery has recently had a sprog. I'm starting wonder it will grow up saying 'we want a feed' or 'we've just crapped our nappy'!

    I've only been watching racing since about 2009, when did this bloody nonsense start? I'd hate for racing to descend into the witless euphemisms of footballer-speak.

    Campaign to stop the 'WE' now!!!

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    " "Rainey's special problem was that he was unable to lead design from the saddle, ".........

    Utter horse puckey............... Rainey was as able as any to give feedback, probably better than most................but he couldn't effect miracles if people don't listen to the information provided and have an open mind on the changes needed.

    " But we've ' always done it / never done it ', that way before " doesn't cut it at the top.

    " In this way, Yamaha engineers now say, they lost direction."

    Buck passing....... not an unknown trait.

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    I think you will find Doohan started 1989 with the evil 1988 NSR500. Eddie & WG had the new bike, which Eddie & Erv worked on, with HRC, to turn into something manageable. Doohan, in his rookie season, had one of the worst handling 500s (perhaps equally as bad as Hailwood's Honda). He survived, but still has the twisted finger as a legacy.

    Now, can we lay this myth to rest that Ducati has an advantage in Superbike World Championship racing. Fact is, the 1198 is the slowest, heaviest and least powerful motorcycle in that arena! And those who think a 1200cc twin has an advantage over a 1000cc four probably also think a 750cc four-stroke would have an advantage over a 500cc two-stroke...

    Back to the topic: Valentino is proving to be no Hailwood, or Lawson. Neither of them went snivelling to the press about how bad their Hondas were, or talked about "pulling in". They worked on making them better. Both won races on what were bad handling motorcycles, and in Eddie's case, he won the 500 championship by dedication and hard work. And HE wasn't paid 15 million Euro.

    So perhaps Rossi's trevails should make us look at those two men (Hailwood & Lawson) in a fresh light...

  • Press Releases: Ducati Motor Holding Acquired by Audi   2 years 49 weeks ago

    Hard to take the news that I will be without the latest Swiftnick gossip and controversy. :D

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    Now these guys knew how to make the most of a bad bike. In 1989, Eddie turned his back on his title winning Yamaha YZR to form a team with Irv to run an NSR Honda in its most evil and frightening incarnation. This was Mick Doohan's first year in GP with Honda and the experience was sobering to say the least. He couldn't understand how Eddie could win races whilst looking like he was out on a Sunday jaunt, while his NSR just felt like it wanted to kill him. History shows that Eddie went on to win the title on the Honda which he and Irv had civilized considerably by the end of the season.

    Wonder if Ducati have their Phone nos.?

  • Press Releases: Ducati Motor Holding Acquired by Audi   2 years 49 weeks ago

    I think it's far better if we are all respectful to each other, even though we may disagree (it would be boring if we all agreed on everything). If someone wants to be bold and say they still think VR's a class rider, they should be allowed to without all the tribal bile kicking in. It doesn't mean the other brave and talented riders aren't class as well.

    I like this as a site for grown-ups, not the school playground! Don't we all want to see good racing (and discussion here), not an F1 style techno-procession?

    BTW, I don't want to marry any of those women, I'd have the press hacking my phone (although Elle would probably blame me).

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    I'm interested to know exactly what directives Valentino has given to the team, that are intended to turn this bus into something more usable for the Italian.
    IF... these instructions are as precise as many believe he can deliver with his supernatural prowess, I cannot fathom how a team with this experience cannot deliver!
    I'm much more inclined nowadays, to believe that they get little more than..,
    "I cannot turn this bike, please fix it!"
    It's not a tongue in cheek comment, but concise feedback and instructions WILL always give results! The team are not backyard hacks, so you have to be realistic with where the problem lies.
    btw, to say he 'proved' himself on the Yamaha, is an outright opinion, it is NOT fact. Lorenzo proved that in '10 when he negotiated equal factory assistance, something that Valentino has NEVER had to deal with before. We all saw the outcome of that.

  • Press Releases: Ducati Motor Holding Acquired by Audi   2 years 49 weeks ago

    With them under direct control of Audi, a company more than willing to pour money into racing efforts, I think it's a very good thing indeed. I cannot imagine Audi being ok with a subsidiary withdrawing in shame any more than they would the 4 rings.

    I'd say expect to see changes in the racing efforts, but changes that make winning a priority over masturbatory claims of "We can't change that! It's our heritage!"

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    What David says about about Rossi and Yamaha is correct if you read Furasawa's interview in full. Furasawa championed and developed the crossplane crankshaft (utilising 'big bang' technology) which was tested at Christmas time in 2003, while Rossi was still a contracted Honda rider. Rossi first rode the new Yamaha at Sepang in 2004. In other words the concept, production and initial testing of the new engine had nothing to do with Rossi.

    The myth of 2004 is that Rossi turned a losing bike bike into a winner. The truth is rather more complex. Rossi never raced the losing 2003 spec Yamaha. Clearly Rossi's input and riding skills were essential to Yamaha's success in 2004, but Rossi needed the right tools for the job, and that is what Furasawa and his engineering team provided. It was a team effort, and unfortunately Furasawa's input is often overshadowed in the haste to praise Rossi's achievements that year. Furasawa himself is very understated in the typical Japanese way in describing his own achievements.

    What we are seeing dramatically demonstrated at Ducati is just how important it is that the engineering team provides a rider with the tools he needs. What Rossi's Ducati experience also shows is that the importance of a rider's development skills is often greatly exaggerated. After all, Rossi also developed the 2006 and 2007 title losing Yamahas. It is apparently true that you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear, even if you are Valentino Rossi.

    Regarding Lorenzo, he beat Rossi fair and square several times. He pushed Rossi all the way in the 2009 championship, in just his second year in MotoGP. Rossi was vastly more experienced, having been in the premier class since 2000. Lorenzo rode so well in 2010 that he very likely would have beaten Rossi to the championship even if Rossi had been fully fit. It is understandable that Lorenzo himself feels he has some unfinished business with Rossi, due to Rossi's injuries in 2010, but that should not diminish our recognition of Lorenzo's achievements.

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    When he was still at Ducati Stoner said that he would be happy to have Rossi as his team mate. But this would be a huge risk for Rossi, because there is every chance Stoner would be far too strong for him. Rossi's best option is for Ducati or someone else to give him a bike to match or beat the Honda and Yamaha. Maybe Audi, with their long and proud history of innovation in motorsport, can give him the tools he needs at Ducati.

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    Would it be Stoner / Lorenzo who objects, or Rossi himself?

    I'm not convinced Rossi would want to be on either premiere team. IMO, Stoner would mop the floor with Valentino, and Lorenzo would comfortably outscore him. The potential damage to Rossi's 'legacy' is incalculable, and I suspect he well knows it. If #46 winds up on a Japanese factory bike, it will be at a satellite team; either Gresini/T3 or the yet-to-be-organized 'Team Tavullia.'

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    glad to see david finally lay aside some of the Rossi gong play and deliver a piece that am sure will be an eye-opener for the yellow-clad army. thanks nostro...i'm sure your views have contributed to that...even if temporary!

  • After a Week of Rumors, Rossi Tells Italian TV He Will Remain With Ducati   2 years 49 weeks ago

    swantz's friendship with Sic part of a "long game"? There is a limit to the irresponsible musings on comments page. Either you are clumsy with language, or you are devoid of human feeling. Swartz is a wear it on your sleeve kind of guy, and the suggestion he made a friendship with sic for ny reason other than he liked the guy is just flat repulsive.

    So people, get a life. Rossi and Swantz are pretty tight, but the odds of Rossi ever riding a Suzuki gp bike are the same as him walking to the moon on a tightrope made of spun gold.

  • Press Releases: Ducati Motor Holding Acquired by Audi   2 years 49 weeks ago

    ...the darndest things here. It was just a day or two ago when one of the two poster children for bile-spewing, hate-frenzied, bitter old men here on MM (I can't recall if it was the "ALL CAPS dog/bike stand" guy or the "misspelled phony fortune-teller" guy) said that there was NO WAY Audi would TOUCH Ducati, because Rossi single-handedly shredded Ducati in the eyes of prospective buyers with his half-hearted, washed-up, has-been performance.

    Turns out his fortune telling isn't any better than his spelling (or the fortune telling of his (sic) namesake).

    David stated it clearly that the Rossi haters are more annoying than his fans ever were, and he even called out one of the two biggest vitriol geysers/clattering buttocks for being so trite and tiresome.

    Bottom line: we'll write what we damn well want to, and hell with the trolls and bitter old men. They'll eventually go back to their lives of mailing monthly alimony checks, eating lots of TV dinners and frequenting the dirty picture websites if we just ignore them.

    We only see what we're allowed to see from Ducati. For all the obvious and readily visible concessions they've made, we don't have the list of the ones they've chosen not to do. They look verrrrrrrrry dedicated from the outside, but how much of what was requested has been furnished? It's like saying that you'd want to be married to Elle MacPherson or Kylie or Marisa Miller or (shudder) Pamela Anderson...but you have precisely NO clue of what they look like first thing in the morning, or if they release industrial-waste-smelling farts when they're asleep, or if they have excessive nose hair that constantly has to be trimmed (or edited out of photos), because they're all dolled up whenever they're in public. We're only seeing what Ducati want us to see, so none of us can say that they're doing things "correctly". For sure, they are working HARD, but are they doing what is being requested and suggested? I think most would say yes, but only about those things which we know. There's much more going on behind the curtain than we know, and I think that at this point, Rossi cares "not a sausage" about being the "Won on Three Marques" guy so much as just being the one who is back to fighting for wins. If ANY brand bike was available that would have him dogfighting for victories, I think he'd jump on it. He wants to win, knows he can, but not on this bike. There's no harm nor foul in admitting that. More notches in the "W" column are, I believe, THE biggest goal for him, regardless of bike.

    But that's just my opinion. I could be wrong. I often am. But I don't think now is one of those times.

  • After a Week of Rumors, Rossi Tells Italian TV He Will Remain With Ducati   2 years 49 weeks ago

    Did you not watch last season? Spec tires and stoner wins a zillion races

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    I found this in "The Grand Prix Motorcycle - The Official Technical History" written by Kevin Cameron.

    Discussing Wayne Rainey and Yamaha:

    "Rainey's special problem was that he was unable to lead design from the saddle, as had Surtees and Roberts before him. His particular skill was his amazing ability to improvise changes to his style, enabling him to win races on whatever Yamaha could provide him. In this way, Yamaha engineers now say, they lost direction."

    Sounds like history repeating itself in Bologna.

  • Press Releases: Ducati Motor Holding Acquired by Audi   2 years 49 weeks ago

    I'm not convinced this is necessarily a good thing for the MGP effort. I think it would be natural for a new owner to examine the books of all parts of the organisation, how much money is going where and what return it is getting. Recently Ducati MGP has spent big and delivered nothing but negative publicity for Ducati.

    Not wishing to be too stereotypical, but Germans are known for their efficiency and logic. What Ducati have is an uncompetitive bike in a series with unstable technical regulations. The most logical thing would be to withdraw, focus back on something Ducati is good at (WSB) then consider a return to MGP once the rules have been sorted out.

    If I owned ducati I would do exactly that, dump the MGP thing, go full factory in WSB and try to erase the bad publicity by winning with the no-frame Panigale. Meanwhile take 1 cylinder of the D16 and make a Moto3 engine, and let someone else worry about making the chassis. They would hopefully regain their high profile in WSB and retain a foot in the door of MGP with an engine configuration that - drawing a very long bow - actually harks back to some of their earlier bikes (desmo singles).

    Just my $0.02

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    "The last GSVR was never lacking in power either, even in 800cc form. Suzuki's trap speeds were right up there. Sure they weren't the outright fastest, but it wasn't power that the bikes lacked to be competitive, it was their inability to get the tires consistently operating properly. That was a chassis and electronics issue."

    This is true, and the tyre problem was always most evident in the first half of a race - with a bit of wear and lighter fuel load the Suzuki generally came good around half race distance. Vermeulen was often the only guy matching Stoner's laptimes toward the end of races, although he was racing for non-podium positions while doing so.

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    "the electronic rider-assistance devices have always been there to keep the highsides for him. Always. Be it in small or big ammounts, it doesn't matter. The fact is those have been always there for him, still are and it won't change anytime soon."

    So what is this a picture of? A plate of egg and chips?

    http://s2.visordown.com/uploads/images/large/39172.jpg

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    "While anyone agrees Stoner has phenomenal throttle control (for this day and age), the electronic rider-assistance devices have always been there to keep the highsides for him. Always. Be it in small or big ammounts, it doesn't matter. The fact is those have been always there for him, still are and it won't change anytime soon."

    Stoner, Lorenzo and Pedrosa all raced and won on 125 and 250 GP bikes, and they don't have traction control. Ever seen a 250 highside? It's no less a disaster for the rider than a 500 highside.

    And if you look at lap and racetimes for their wins, they are directly comparable - if not better - than the lap and race times achieved in those classes by Rossi and other pre-TC racers.

    So postulating that the current generation of top shelf riders would not be able to ride 500cc two-stroke GP bikes at the same level that Rossi did is utter nonsense.

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago
    ?

    You miss the point Chris - the gentleman in question has been a valuable contributor in the past (I've been here longer than both of you so I have a pretty good idea) however lately his contributions are all of much the same colour. It gets a little tiresome.

    Speaking of long-term contributors - am I the only one who thinks PITBULL has been enjoying a bit more than the writing before he posts up? : )

  • Nicky Hayden To Continue Testing At Mugello This Week   2 years 49 weeks ago

    Has anyone heard anything from the Ducati test????

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    As an Aussie I don't buy V4Racers comments about wringing a bike's neck being a peculiarly Aussie trait, but I guess we get other stereotypes and generalisations lumped on us.........like Casey's bluntness being a typical Aussie trait (which I've read on this site before but never bothered to challenge).
    So I won't take issue with the first paragraph.

    In the second paragraph, though, you invent an argument so you can justify the rest of your comment. indesq, no reasoning person thinks you can do any more than beat the best riders that you are up against.
    But then you seek to imply that Doohan didn't beat anyone of note.
    I bet all the good riders Mick beat are happy to be described as being no competition, because that is exactly what your statement seems to imply.

    If you are going to go into bat for Vali, at least do it with a properly argued case, rather than chucking mud at a former champ to try to justify your own impoverished argument.

    BTW, if we are comparing Mick and Vali, I suggest you look at winning percentage - 46.1% cf 39.7%.
    Or average of 19.5 points per race cf 18.3.
    Or maybe poles 49.6% cf 24.6%.
    Or even fastest laps 39.3% cf 33.2%.

  • Press Releases: Ducati Motor Holding Acquired by Audi   2 years 49 weeks ago

    - ............."As a sporty, global premium brand, Ducati is an excellent fit for Audi."
    -..............''Ducati a leading player in engine technology and lightweight construction''
    -..............''is one of the world's most profitable motorcycle manufacturers.''

    bla bla bala $$$$$$$$ yes this is marketing.
    Does marketing have some space for my horny right hand ?
    Lock your garage .

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea: Valentino Rossi's Options for the Future   2 years 49 weeks ago

    You often post valid points and I actually pretty often agree with you. But your determination to label David a Rossi adept is rediculous and hurting your credibility. What's going on?

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