Recent comments

  • Troy Bayliss To Make Shock Return To World Superbikes, To Replace Injured David Giugliano   1 week 5 days ago

    Don't forget his MotoGP wildcard at Valencia in '06!

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 5 days ago

    wondering where in all this Ducati are going to start testing with the Michelins and the spec ECU's? Clearly HRC and Yamaha are already testing with the Michelins and have (albeit in an old frame in Yamaha's case) the Magneti ECU. Surely Ducati need to start testing with the spec software and the new tyres?? And on a brand new bike, that is NOT going to be easy...

    Tanto lavoro indeed.........

  • Troy Bayliss To Make Shock Return To World Superbikes, To Replace Injured David Giugliano   1 week 5 days ago

    I hope he is reasonably competitive, but just to see him on a top shelf superbike again will be priceless.

    I went to the Bayliss Moto Expo in Brisbane last year, which finished off with a series of flat track races - with Chris Vermeulen, Garry McCoy, Karl Muggeridge, Jason Crump and others - and he was in fine form there!

  • 2015 Phillip Island Test Day 2 WSBK Times: Lowes Maintains His Grip   1 week 5 days ago

    So Troy the Boy is indeed going to take Giugliano's bike for the weekend... well called NM : )

    I remember you from Motorsportforums, I was The Phantom there (and here for a while but that id fell over many years back). Pat posts here too...

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 5 days ago

    "We managed to create harmony within the working group, both at the track and here," Ducati Corse sporting director Paolo Ciabatti told me. The engine department speaks to the chassis department, the chassis department speaks to the electronics department, the electronics department speaks to the engine department."

    I always fall back to the article Matt Oxley (I think) wrote about the gulf between the guys in the garage over the weekend and the guys at Bologna not wanting to listen.

    This to me was the fundamental issue at Ducati Corse. Of course Dall'Igna is a genius engineer, we all know this, but he also seems to be a great manager.

    I also cannot recall Ducati saying they'd found the problem, I think they suffered the same issues as Yamaha did in the early days of the M1. They didn't know which way to go with it, and just threw parts at it. Remember Carlos Checa saying the M1 was dangerous to ride?

    The GP15 I think shows a marked improvement in both communication and working practices at Ducati. I really do hope it pays off for them all. Because they deserve it.

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    Troy's win was something special, but one win is not 'consistently capable of'.

    Boy did he show what he had in the tank that day - if only he'd had that crew from the start of his MotoGP campaign.

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    David,
    You wrote;
    “It means beating the engineering might of Yamaha and Honda, something which only the mercurial genius of Casey Stoner was consistently capable of doing since 2007, and the wiles and doggedness of Loris Capirossi before then.”

    I do not want to be pedantic, but Troy Bayliss, should be also added to the two names above, that was a great ride, really against slim odds.

    Thanks though, nice article as usual. Let’s hope Ducati can mix-it up with the Hondas and the Yamahas.

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    compared to the costs of electronics & engine development. Kawaski particularly dropped out because of the non-stop regulation change regarding the engine size. Suzuki and Mitsubishi couldn't keep up with the electronics race expansion.

    As for their chassis, the ZX-RR and the GSV-R actually handled extremely well, even after the control tire introduction. Poor electronics and weak or rider-unfriendly motorisation were by far their 2 main weakness.

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    That would be interesting.
    I have said repeatedly on this forum and others that in my humble opinion a "big bang" on a V4 is a step backwards. Big bang on a V4! Does my head in.

    I see the urban myths about 90 degree Vee being the problem are still lurking. Reminds me of the "Stoner was only good because of electronics" myth.

  • 2015 Phillip Island Test Day 2 WSBK Times: Lowes Maintains His Grip   1 week 6 days ago

    Wow Torres! Third on his first outing? Keep it on 2 wheels buddy, you have made your mark. Holy smokes!

    Re Giugliano
    Bummer he is out. Hospital assessment = two low back vertebrae fractures. Dr Costa assessment = "the facial hair too much Biaggi, try to hard for mustache is problem to crashing."
    ;)

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    particularly with the new regulations and their bike had nothing left to prove either. With 2016 in line of sight, return to moto gp came as a natural process to them. They always knew how to develop a chassis but the RS cube era and its lame F1 input is over. Aprilia's biggest asset today is its engine and they know they got an absolute gem with that homemade V4, they just couldn't wait to prove it.

    I think Aprilia will be surprisingly fast already in 2015, I mean fast, relatively speaking of course.

    My 2 cents. Cheers.

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago
    90

    Honda uses a 90 degree V. David wrote an amazing piece on why that isn't the issue a year or more ago.. It was linked in a fairly recent article also.. have a look mate, https://motomatters.com/analysis/2013/02/18/honda_rc213v_revealed_to_use...

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the Honda RC213V also employ a 90 degree vee angle?

    Honda RC213V Revealed

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    I don't ever recall them saying they'd found the problem. They've sure tried a lot of things over the years, but I've never heard them say anything was gauranteed to fix their known understeer issue

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    I wonder if they considered trying carbon fibre again. Considering that it appears that the problems weren't the choice of materials, but rather layout and configuration issues. Maybe they could have even got a jump on H/Y and leapt past them in one go

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    I can't help but wonder if Aprilia haven't decided to go racing in MotoGP simply due to the good old Italian contest of honour... they can't help themselves... "Ducati are racing with Gigi? Vaffanculo! He's breaking my balls. OK, Fausto, we race in 2015, yes? No no no no no, nevermind that the bike she is not ready - we race!"

    With apologies to our Italian readers : )

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    Ducati's insistence on sticking with a 90 degree vee angle causes the
    Ducati packaging problems which will never be overcome well enough
    to allow Ducati to beat Honda and Yamaha consistently enough to win
    a manufacturer's title.

    Sure, this year Ducati tilted the engine back. But what they really need to
    do is start from a clean sheet of paper and forget everything which has
    been done before. Tires won't fix the problem, nor will any number of
    frame or swing arm changes. The 90 degree vee has to go, and it really
    is that simple.

    Or, they could hire Stoner away from Honda ( not gonna happen ) and pay him to race the bike ( this will never happen). Stoner has so far been the only human on earth who could keep a Ducati at the front of the MotoGP pack in the current era. This alone proves there is a fundamental design problem with the Ducati. Only one alien could make the bike work well enough that it was competitive. It's not like the other riders who couldn't make the Ducati work are not among the best in the world, and they have
    won on more than one brand as well. The variable which is problematic
    is the bike.

    I understand why Ducati is reluctant to abandon the traditional 90 degree
    vee. The bikes they sell the public all use this configuration. But adhering to a design which doesn't work any more is eventually going to result in the
    street Ducati line looking like yesterday's design news.

    Personally, I expect KTM to soon become the foremost competitor for Honda
    and Yamaha.

  • 2015 Jerez Moto2 And Moto3 Test Day 1 Times: Zarco Edges Lowes, Viñales Beats Antonelli   1 week 6 days ago

    HAHA! Touché!

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    David, a great summation - and your presence at the launch says a great deal about both your dedication to the sport, and to the esteem with which you are regarded within the highest echelons of the sport.

    Your 14th paragraph really should have Stoner's accomplishments set against the comments about the mighty riders at the top, rather than the manufacturers, but I guess it was hard to frame it that way when Marquez has never raced against Stoner (and more's the pity there, but we all know that).

    It's commonly held that Dovi and Iannone aren't up to matching the top four guys, let alone beating them, but in my opinion neither of them have peaked as riders yet - so anything is possible, including a Ducati on the top step of the podium sometime during 2015. And it would be a fairytale indeed, with Ducati an entirely home-grown team, especially if a victory came on home soil.

    I'd like to be in Italy on that day...

  • 2015 Phillip Island WSBK Test Photos By Andrew Gosling   1 week 6 days ago

    No... that would be Mrs De Puniet ; )

    Great photos. What is that finned thing under the MV's tail, surely not a regulator/rectifier?

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    Ducati have the same problem as Suzuki and Kawasaki. When the control tire was introduced, the manufacturers could no longer ask for specific tires to help mask deficiencies or accentuate strengths of their bike. Instead, everyone had to throw a small fortune chassis development. Suzuki and Kawasaki dropped out. Ducati persevered, even when it required them (in their minds) to fire Preziosi, and scrap the carbon fiber monocoque development. Scrapping carbon fiber was probably part of a cost-cutting agreement. One that also forced Honda to abandon their V-angle development for an L-configuration. The same agreement is probably why Suzuki canned the V-configuration entirely, and developed a crossplane I-4, like Yamaha, but I digress.

    Maybe Dall'Igna will be the man to make Ducati work, but it's hard to imagine them beating the Japanese at their own game. Harder still to imagine another 2007 season, where one team makes the others look silly.

    Maybe we'll get lucky and Michelin will change the game again. If they develop a variety of tires, the manufacturers might be able to make a variety of designs competitive.

  • Official Photos Of The Ducati Desmosedici GP15   1 week 6 days ago

    The homologation schematics were once posted on the FIM website. It listed the minimum and maximum dimensions for certain parts of the fairings. There are also rules for how the leading edge of the front fairing relates to the front axle, IIRC. We don't see the homologation rules so we don't know the details of enforcement, but the general guidelines were once public.

    Some of the rules are still in the technical regulations. For instance, any wings on the fairing cannot be wider than the handlebars. Moveable aerodynamic appendages are banned.

    It is possible that the teams are simply raising and shortening the leading edge of the fairing to improve handling and cooling, but the changes have been too uniform. If they changed the angle and distance regulations from the front axle, it would explain why all of the bikes are pug-faced for 2015.

  • Analyzing The Ducati Desmosedici GP15: Smaller, Sharper, Faster, But Can It Win?   1 week 6 days ago

    It would be marvelous to see Ducati succeed.

    Yes we have all been fooled a million times by "We seem to have found the problem." news from Ducati. When Vale was there they blamed the chassis (or rather the lack of one), then the swingarm, then the engine, and inbetween the Bridgestone tyres, but you know what, call me stupidly optimistic, I think they might have a case this time.

    Suzuki has, it seems, made a great bike which just lacks a little bit of power, but I don't think it will pose too much of a problem for them, in other words I am optimistic about Suzuki squeezing more power from the engine.

    So, could we, possibly, for the first time in a very long time have 4 capable, yet different bikes on the grid?

    The only ones who seem desperatly lost are the people at Aprilia.
    Yes I know they decided to enter the championship earlier than expected, but it seems that Marco Melandri has almost no desire to be here and the bike is a rather strange venture.

    I certainly hope that isn't the case, and that they find their heading, because I've always admired Aprilia. Pre-Piaggio era, Aprilia did many things with very limited resources, and to win titles on a budget, is the mark of doing something right.

    I only hope we don't have the spiritual successor of the RS3 cube.

  • 2015 Jerez Moto2 And Moto3 Test Day 1 Times: Zarco Edges Lowes, Viñales Beats Antonelli   1 week 6 days ago

    I am blown away by Lowes.

    Yes I am aware that testing should not be taken too much into consideration, but it sometimes is a good indicative of something.

    Now, the lad has been inconsistent, granted, but I was of the opinion that it has more to do with the chassis than with the man himself. When I heard that he was to remain with Speed Up i sighed.

    Unfortunately those who arive from the production series are looked upon as the underdogs, with the exception of Spies who was welcomed with high expectations. Underperform and sometimes you get a quick boot, but, seeing how this time is really near the pole time of 2014, I say well done!

    I'm sure the man himself had a big role in it, seeing how he is almost a whole second faster than last year, but it seems that Speed Up, has indeed stepped up. (Excuse my pun)

    I am not impressed by the younger brother Marquez so far.

    As for Moto3, Quartararo is just astonishing as far as testing is concerned.

    Yes I realize that he knows the tracks and the bike, but nevertheless, most don't perform instantly.

    I think Moto3 will be the most interesting class, between Binder, Fenati, Quartararo, Bastianini, Kent and others, one can't simply choose a favorite.

    Oh man I hate the off season...

  • 2015 Phillip Island Test Day 2 WSBK Times: Lowes Maintains His Grip   1 week 6 days ago

    Nice to see it so tight at the top and with good variety of machinery (and a big shame Giugliano won't be there as he's been very fast too. Hopefully they can find a suitable replacement for the weekend *cough, cough, Bayliss, cough cough*). Super impressed with Torres and Canepa and even Terol.
    Is there any word on tires this year, especially for WSS, as the forecast for raceday is currently a sunny 32 degrees C. Would hate to see the Australian crowd ripped off again with short races.

GTranslate