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  • 2015 MotoGP Sepang 2 Day 3 Round Up: Marquez vs Lorenzo, Honda vs Yamaha, And Why The Open Honda Is Still Slow   1 hour 12 min ago

    No, the race is to the line and Stoner was 1st over the line. It would be stolen if Stoner had played dirty and tried to run Spies of the track or something similar but that never happened - the race was clean (Bautista on the other hand was a complete muppet!)

    Spies rode well that day, particularly when the rain fell but it could be argued he got into the lead purely because Stoner made a mistake and ran wide.

    It could also be counter-argued Spies made Stoner lose concentration when he ran wide. Suppose it depends on wether you look at with Yamaha or Honda tinted glasses. Either way, both rode hard and Stoner simply got way better drive out of the final corner.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   3 hours 32 min ago

    The tires do go off during a race. Just because they're consistent doesn't mean they don't degrade. We've recently had riders with different riding styles going at it hammer and tongs with close racing. Tire choice for races has played itd part in races, off the top of my head I'm thinking indianapolis and Phillip Island last year where it was a factor.

    I agree if Michelin tires go off more than Bs it could mix it up a bit but will it improve racing? Hard to say

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   5 hours 41 min ago

    Well no actually, 2014 was a repsol whitewash with the only consistent challenger being a 35 year old-albeit freak former champion. 2010-2012 were mostly a tri love fest between stoner, Jorge and Dani with predominantly predictable in line time trial racing.

    Thankfully Marquez has upset the apple cart. And I don't believe the majority of punters give a toss if the race is 20 seconds longer if there is passing for the lead.

    Why can't the tires go off during the race? (And Not because of faulty old stock) Why can't we see a choice of compounds that allows teams to take a chance on a race strategy? With the increased fuel allowance and controlled ECU, with any luck the main variables will be tyre, rider and mechanical setup in 2016.

  • 2015 MotoGP Sepang 2 Day 3 Round Up: Marquez vs Lorenzo, Honda vs Yamaha, And Why The Open Honda Is Still Slow   6 hours 4 min ago

    Wins aren't stolen they're earned but I know what you mean. The thing is Spies stole defeat (well 2nd) from the jaws of victory with his timid last lap.

    Had he taken a second win I can't help but feel Bens gp career would've turned out a lot different. Sadly we'll never know.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   6 hours 14 min ago

    everyone saying Michelin are close to Bs in terms of tire development but using top riders as a reference they are over 1s a lap off in pace with a worrying amount of fast front end crashes. A large number of lap records are smashed year on year at the moment on BS - see Julian Rider's article on Soup - and people think tire development has lacked recently? What series are you guys watching?

    On this site it was said that when the factory riders would test Michelin that theyd all lap quicker than on Bs, which of course never happened. Seems people are buying the hype from somewhere. In the end Michelin will get the job done but is everyone currently not impressed at what they are seeing in Motogp?

  • The Racing Week On Wednesday (On Friday) - News Round Up For The Week Of 27th February   8 hours 3 min ago

    Don't get me wrong, scoring points in Moto GP is by no means an easy feat, but if it wasn't for his father he would be running mid-pack in some obscure national series. Or just not racing.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   9 hours 4 min ago

    I am certainly welcoming the return of Michelin, as they were the no1 tyre supplier for a great many years. Only really getting beaten by the supply rule change at the start of the 2007 season.

    The overnight specials were an incredible committment to being the best, and whilst they couldn't/wouldn't supply all of their teams with these they were almost unbeatable. A better rule would have been to make Michelin supply all of their riders with at least one set of specials each race weekend. And possibly the drudgery of most of the Bridgestone sole supply era might have been avoided.

    Michelin always seemed to have a better feel for the sport, and the fact that they are close to Bridgestones "developed" rubber with no setup time speaks volumes and is not entirely surprising to me at least.
    with any luck as others have suggested this will shake things up.

  • The Racing Week On Wednesday (On Friday) - News Round Up For The Week Of 27th February   11 hours 7 min ago

    Is he still around ? Why does this guy persist in making a fool of himself ?

    A case of ." Too much money and no talent " ?

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   12 hours 27 min ago

    My point is that 17" inner diameter is not a magical attribute that makes the manufacturers use production relevant materials, designs, and technologies. Perhaps 17" inner diameter will make the tires more similar to road tires, but only because of other extenuating rules and regulations about rim width, total tire diameter, and so forth. The 17" concept is mainly a canard, dreamed up by marketing people who think the world exists to absorb their version of reality.

    No really, these tires are more production relevant than anything previously, and it will improve our street tires!!! We promise!! Soon racing slicks will be OEM equipment, and you'll all be dragging your elbows!

    The world is not populated by 15 year olds, though they've clearly taken over marketing and advertising.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   23 hours 39 min ago

    Valid point except the production market has been using 17" rims for so long and they work so well I don't see the oems wanting/needing to switch. Also then everyone who purchased forged 17" Marchesini or OZ rims for their gsxr, fireblades , etc would now have $3000 paper weights if the oems switched to 17" and the tire manufacturers focused on 16.5"

  • The Racing Week On Wednesday (On Friday) - News Round Up For The Week Of 27th February   1 day 5 hours ago

    This guy seems to have a habit of cruising for tows in testing - there's a video on youtube of him and Stoner having a good shout at one another in pit lane over a very similar situation at another test.
    I seem to remember Stoner saying he couldn't understand the point of getting a tow at a test - it doesn't really achieve anything, does it?

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   1 day 10 hours ago

    I see little need to get riled up. Does anyone think that without even sorting setup for the tires they are going to work nearly flawlessly? Man,, what a tough crowd! Shift a bit of set up, and adjust riding style a bit, and badabing badaboom. Ducati has the most to gain here methinks btw. Right now I am pondering how much Gigi and company considered the decrease in F grip we all knew has been coming when making the new bike. It just makes sense that a bike undergoing a revolution would synch up better w a ture change than one that was not. What if the WHOLE BIKE was developed with projections of the likely Michelin characteristics in mind? Oooh, the possibilities are tantalizing.

    I am looking fwd to the shuffle! The Honda - Yamaha cup has had me yawning. Let's mix things up a bit and enjoy, I say. Some riders and bikes are going to gel well w the new tire and surge ahead. I remember racing and trying Bstone instead of my Dunlops, and having one horrific race trying to keep it upright. Then switching to Pirelli and WOW! It was a new lease on life. Others did the exact opposite. Perhaps, just like certain riders and their style fit certain bikes, we will see "Bstone riders" and "Michelin riders."

    Best 2 yrs of MotoGP interest for me in a looooong time.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   1 day 12 hours ago

    "The reasons for this are simple: Michelin feel the knowledge gained from using a standard size used in road tires will transfer more directly into production. Though the tire sizes are different, the outer diameter is exactly the same, the difference coming in the height of the sidewall."

    They should get into the manure business. They'll never run out of product. As if the production market couldn't use 16.5" diameter tires just as easily as 17's. The relationship between the tire size and the inner diameter affects all manner of performance characteristics.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   1 day 14 hours ago

    So after only a couple of tests and with a different rim size the Michelins are nearly as fast as the Bridgestones while still using a Bridgestone bike setup. If the teams were able to tweak the bike setup, had more than one day to test and had riders willing to push for a fast time they would have broken the track record.

    Michelin has not made a GP tire in over 6 years while Bridgestone has 'developed' their GP tires thoughout that period. This says a lot about the material being supplied by Bridgestone: enough quality to prevent major embarrasment (but not entirely successful at that, se PI 2013) but nothing extra thrown in, and God forbid any actual R&D happens because that costs money and this is after all, a marketing campaign.

    I'm nearly at the stage of looking for a new favorite sport.

    Chris

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   1 day 16 hours ago

    That is close to the situation. First, these bikes are being ridden with a Bridgestone set up, where the front has all the grip and they are trying to find grip at the rear. That means moving weight to the rear (as an aside, Jerry Burgess and the crew spent the first half of 2008, afer Valentino Rossi had switched from Michelin to Bridgestone, moving weight further back to accommodate the front grip). The Michelins have the grip the other way round, less at the front, a lot at the rear. That means that the front is more likely to wash out anyway.

    What is happening, as I understand it, is that the riders are trying to exploit the grip they have at the rear by opening the gas earlier and earlier. As highside specialist says, this means opening the gas when the bike is still very leaned over. Do that on a Bridgestone, and the rear washes out, or worse, slips and grips and tosses you over the highside. With the Michelins, the front is pushing through the corners anyway, because the bike balance is wrong. Opening the gas early at full lean pushes the front further and further, the bike runs wide, and eventually the front lets go.

    Normally, getting on the gas is a good remedy for most problems, but the problem the riders are describing is happening at the limits of their ability, which is far beyond anything normal riders (even normal racers) can manage. They are getting into problems on the gas, not using the gas to get themselves out of problems. 

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   1 day 16 hours ago

    That was in his first year, all of these guys have had plenty of big crashes on every variation of bike they've ridden.

    It's a bit unfair to Lorenzo's talent to suggest Bridgestone tyres are the reason he isn't having huge crashes every weekend.

  • 2015 MotoGP Sepang 2 Day 3 Round Up: Marquez vs Lorenzo, Honda vs Yamaha, And Why The Open Honda Is Still Slow   1 day 16 hours ago

    Not interested in being anyones fan, I respect all the MotoGP pilots for their skill and big kahunas; so can it be argued that both Dovi and Bautista have ridden satellite bikes better?

    Points make prizes, so surely the results determine who rode what well, to level it off, I only looked at time spent on a MotoGP satellite machines, factory rides are not relevant to the sample.

    Cruthlow
    Satellite rides;
    2011 Tech 3 Yamaha satellite - 11th
    2012 Tech 3 Yamaha satellite - 7th
    2013 Tech 3 Yamaha satellite - 5th

    Dovi
    2008 Scot Honda Satellite - 5th
    2012 Tech 3 Yamaha - 4th

    Bautista
    2012 Honda Gresini - 5th
    2013 Honda Gresini - 6th
    2014 Honda Gresini - 11th

    Both Dovi and Bautista were both factory riders when Crutchlow joined as a rookie in 2011, whilst Dovi's class shines through even on a satellite machine its reasonable to say Crutclow's record is at least comparable with Bautista.

    So to the second part, its far to say Aleix Espargaró is a fantastic rider who hasn't always had the best available kit, however Aleix was a 'full' satellite rider in 2010 on the Pramac Ducati when he finished the season 14th.

    Pol finished 6th in his rookie year on a Tech 3 Yamaha which was a brilliant achievement and marks him out as a special talent. Worth noting though in Crutchlow's rookie season he was Yamaha's No 4 rider and bottom of the pile, Pol is a factory employee and getting treated as such. This takes nothing away from Pol's achievement though, well deserved plaudits for a great debut.

    My assessment is simple
    Pol has had a better start to his MotoGP career than his brother, Dovi is a world class rider, Crutchlow is generally no better and definitely not any worse than those he is being compared too;- as a satellite rider.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   1 day 17 hours ago

    I think what's being said is that the GP-level tires offer so much more grip than us non GP riders can ever imagine, you can open the throttle while at steep lean angles. While doing so, the rear tire will have a bigger contact patch than the front. if still leaned, the front tire is being pushed while on its side. this push is overwhelming the edge grip.

    That's my interpretation, anyway.

  • 2015 MotoGP Sepang 2 Day 3 Round Up: Marquez vs Lorenzo, Honda vs Yamaha, And Why The Open Honda Is Still Slow   1 day 22 hours ago

    Remember his 2nd win was stolen from him by Stoner/HRC at Valencia. Nothing Ben could do about it. Also, only a select few GP riders are head & shoulders above the best WSB riders. WSB champs have almost always been in the top 6-8 in gp. So take away your top 3 established GP gods who are always there and throw in your Brit, Aussie or Yank whom the gp team won't listen to for a year. By the time the WSB champ knows what's going on he is on a B-team.

    Had Hayden not been US Honda's golden child he would never have survived his early career in Gp. Look what happened to Edwards. A better rider with a deeper resume. It is more about the system in GP.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   2 days 1 hour ago

    overnight specials were banned for a couple of years. it was during those years Michelin lost the tire-war to Bridgestone.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   2 days 3 hours ago

    ..."nobody ever lost the front on the gas"???

    I think the explanation of *why* riders crashed, in paragraph 7, is not entirely accurate.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   2 days 3 hours ago

    ...in 2007 when the 800 was introduced so I don't see them as a given favorite for 2016. Maybe this is what will bring back the Ducatis to the top, like Bridgestone did in 2007?

  • 2015 MotoGP Sepang 2 Day 3 Round Up: Marquez vs Lorenzo, Honda vs Yamaha, And Why The Open Honda Is Still Slow   2 days 11 hours ago

    Well...Bayliss, is just Bayliss. ;)

    For him to come in and win that one race after being off the Motogp bike for awhile just shows that he always had the speed there. He said that Ducati would not listen to him. But with the crew he used for that race he was able to get what he was asking for.

    Still feel something happened in the background with Ben. Dont' know if it was in his personal life or on the team. His luck was not just him jacking up, there were alot of MYSTERIOUS failures happening with him. He had more raw talent than Crutchlow to me. But Crutchlow at the Motogp level seems to have a little more "F*ck you!" in him than I saw with Spies which is surprising because Spies had the about the worst teammate you could ever deal with in AMA. He was fast AND talked mess about Spies every race and interview.

    To me I do not think rider styles matter as much. When Lorenzo started winning everyone said tires in line works. Now Marquez is dominating real hard and making veterans look like rookies riding like he is at a dirt track. Really does seem it is whatever works for the rider with the speed. Everyone else has to emulate to catch up.

  • Analyzing The Michelin Tire Test: Despite Secrecy And Crashes, Positive Results   2 days 13 hours ago

    I think the real problem here is the single tyre supplier. The main problem with the tyre competition was that, apart from two companies dominating it -and anyone sorry enough to be on Dunlops getting left behind- the qualifying tyres and overnight specials unfairly advantaged certain teams with lots of money.

    I say bring back multiple suppliers of spec tyres. Don't allow overnight specials, but rather give them an allocation like the current system, but allow more than one manufacturer in. We'll probably still end up with only two manufacturers at a time, but at least we won't have all this trouble with switching the entire field at once.

  • 2015 MotoGP Sepang 2 Day 3 Round Up: Marquez vs Lorenzo, Honda vs Yamaha, And Why The Open Honda Is Still Slow   2 days 13 hours ago

    Indeed, Cal made a silly mistake, but I guess from ‘his point of view’ he had little or no other options, I would say…
    When he was at Tech 3 and Rossi decided to continue, he saw his ultimate dream, a factory Yamaha ride, go up in smoke…
    At Ducati, he never felt at home, not only on the bike, but more importantly, in the ‘communication’ with the Italians. Dall’Igna never kept it secret that he preferred working with Dovi. Cal, such a social guy, never felt taken seriously and accepted among the Italians…
    On top of that, last year he was put in the shade by the better results ànd the positive approach (which is not the least important from a factory's viewpoint!) of yet another Italian, Iannone. So in the end, I guess Cal felt him left with almost no other option than to leave Ducati…
    Hope I got it all wrong, but I guess Cal's chances to ever throw his leg over a championship winning factory MotoGP bike are all gone now. But who knows, perhaps this year we will see him shine again in its 'good old' role, thumbs up ;-) Go for it Cal !!!!

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