Recent comments

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   3 hours 32 min ago

    Have the rumours of a Moto gp ride for Sam Lowes next year gone away now? BT Sport had been saying Aprilia were after him...

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   4 hours 2 min ago

    I think you're being a bit too harsh with that. There are only four bikes that might win the championship at the moment - but there are many more that a racing seriously. All the factory Hondas and Yamahas have a chance at winning, although the factory teams are much more likely. The factory team Ducatis have been on the podium this year, and with a bit more improvement will be looking for the top step. Suzuki have come in a year earlier than expected and are already looking like they might be a threat in a couple more years. Aprilia are a bit of an unknown quantity at the moment - because they're still racing a production derived bike this year. Then there's the big shake-up that will happen with a different tyre manufacturer and spec electronics - remember 2007.

    I think the problem with a smaller grid in the top is that there will be even less mobility to allow good riders a chance at motogp. Factories will keep the same eight riders on the bikes forever, because it's always safer to go with what you know, and without the satellites nipping at their heals there will be little incentive to try a change.

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   6 hours 41 min ago

    Let us look at what was the past. Apart from the Rothman's Honda team which was the factory team, the team that was favoured next by Honda was the Honda Pons team as also the Gresini Honda team. Now the fact that Pons disappeared because of the recession and his inability to raise funds to me raises doubts about his having the resources to get back into MotoGP and what machinery will he get. A Honda? Ducati? One can be sure that it will not be a Yamaha (unless Forward's open bikes are given to him) and certainly not Suzuki or Aprilia. So it seems kind of difficult that any teams from the Moto2 category can be expected to rise into MotoGP. In fact, I think the Moto2 model and the mindset it has created (cut price racing with low tech machinery). Maybe the time has come to create a Moto1 category just like the Moto2 and then have a MotoGP category with just 8 motorcycles (factory ones only). Anyway, there are no more than 8 motorcycles racing seriously in MotoGP and up front it is a four horse race (and has been for some years now). So in fact, you can have MotoGP only for the aliens (though there is one person here who has problems with this classification). Really what is the point in having a number of uncompetitive bikes circulating? I am sure just the factory bikes will probably more interesting because of the fact that they are competitive. I will be quite happy to see eight factory bikes and the four aliens fighting it out. This way the money maths will also be simpler.

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   8 hours 48 sec ago

    reading David's thoughts on silly season!

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   12 hours 18 min ago

    ... to have Hernandez on it. He's often been the best of the GP14 riders, I have been impressed with him lately.

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   12 hours 28 min ago

    To have a team on the grid still racing a GP14.2 in 2016 seems like madness. The bike has been demonstrably bad for years, and that a team would still pay good money for it, 2 years after the whole design was canned, seems crazy.

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   12 hours 46 min ago

    Thanks for filling us in on the rider/team/sponsor chess game. Very Interesting!

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   14 hours 9 min ago

    great info david , sightfull and a good explanation too
    nice effort.

    i will become a site supporter in the coming weeks

    greets hjm

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 2   15 hours 45 min ago

    It is interesting to see how smaller teams take on the available grid spots in MotoGP. Do teams work their way up from the smaller classes; from Moto3 to Moto2 with the ultimate goal of obtaining a grid spot on MotoGP? Or will a team hire experienced crews and riders and hope for the best.

    It looks like Aki Ajo team has the right formula to be successful in the lower classes but will that same formula work in MotoGP?

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   17 hours 49 min ago

    There were Honda I-6s at Paul Ricard in 1978, but they just whispered around the circuit. The Laverda V6 engine was designed by an ex-Maserati engineer - to hear it honking down the Mistral straight was something else. You can get a taste of that sweet music here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJhn0rzfHJk

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 1   20 hours 33 min ago

    With the number of teams in financial and/or legal difficulty it is looking possible there will only be 18 riders on the grid next year. Forward, Aspar, Ioda (why are they still on the grid?) and AB are all unlikely to make the cut. With LCR down to 1 rider as well that removes 7 bikes from this year's grid with no Open (or whatever they call it next year) Hondas or Yamahas. The back of the grid will be Hector Barbera on an old Ducati and Bautista on the Aprilia.

    But don't worry, Carmelo's New World Order comes in 2017 when the factories will charge less than the maximum allowed for bikes, Suzuki will supply a satellite team and Porcine Airways will fly to every GP.

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   22 hours 30 min ago

    Pol taking it easy, its an endurance race after all.

    DSC05171-2.jpg

    Go there and you will understand.

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 39 min ago

    It's the same old haters, hanging on to that old comment until they could spit it out with the rest of their bile.
    Thank the Universal Deity, they are mostly at crash.net, and not here.
    Anyway, they've probably mostly moved on to trolling Lewis Hamilton hate sites. Isn't he the current whipping boy?

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 45 min ago

    And a certain Laverda 1000cc V6 passing the OW31's down the main straight in one of the endurance races!
    150hp out of a 1 litre bike was pretty much unheard of in those days. And carburetted, too.
    Apparently the howl was something to behold.
    Put paid to by the decision to use shaft drive and having a poorly located universal joint output that put (if I remember correctly) too much force on the joint at full extension of compression of the suspension.

  • Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 1   1 day 3 hours ago

    The last 10 bikes...

    Thanks David. Looking fwd to the next installment - my interest is keen re the rear end of the grid. What bikes will be back there? And who on them? Suzuki and or Aprilia satellite bikes? 2015 leftovers from Ducati and Yamaha again? And what of the others? No more Open Hondas I assume, eh?

    Chewing my fingers off over here!

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 3 hours ago

    Odd and ugly vitriol has rippled back at Stoner. It is ugly, unnecessary, and smells of ego. He has become a lightning rod of both defense and attack that is polarized, personal, and reactive. Perhaps from a perspective that he violated some unwritten code that he was supposed to "make nice" and filter himself re his feelings about...everything. Owed it to us, the series, his employer, his competitors, etc. I find the secondary reactions towards his public personae (and lack thereof) off putting much more than his public personae or lack thereof.

  • Official: Forward Racing To Miss Indianapolis, Hopeful For Brno   1 day 4 hours ago

    They can't find someone to put up a measly $2 million? Isn't there some rich guy who wants to go world grand prix motorcycle racing for the next few months? Antonio Banderas? Michael Jordan? David Letterman? Earl Hayden? Seems like three of those four could spend 2 mil on a three-month vacation; they just need a little convincing.

    That'd give the team time to come up with a new format (I like the Sito Pons/Alex Rins idea) for next year. Lesson #1: Don't put everything in one person's name. Aren't racing teams made by their sanctioning bodies to be set up as corporations in order to protect them in this sort of situation? Why would Dorna let a team operate as a sole proprietorship?

    On the other hand, would anyone really miss the team if it weren't around the rest of the year?

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 9 hours ago

    I think a cable has better resilience overall. With a cable controlling the intake, and a computer controlling the fueling you have a fail-safe. Even if the fueling system goes completely haywire you can close the throttle and the engine will choke itself.

    The margin of error on a race track doesn't allow for that though, if you miss your braking marker by 3m then you're already off the track.

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 9 hours ago

    And yet the comments on other sites are still full of trolls suggesting that CS's 'ambition outweighed his talent'.

    I've always found CS to be good at explaining his efforts once you realise that he's actually giving more information than expected. Most riders would say "I wasn't fast enough" CS will say "I wasn't fast enough because the tyres don't feel right" or "there's a balance issue" or "the throttle stuck". This is often interpreted as blaming the bike. Other riders will be telling all this to their crew chief in the debrief as areas to work on, CS just gets it out there in the press conference.

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 10 hours ago

    "It is tragic that Suzuka is not on the MotoGP calendar. But if it was, even greater tragedy might follow." Kato's death was tragic. Bianchi's too. Suzuka's absence from the calendar isn't.

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 15 hours ago

    From what I understand they sell hardly any flagship bikes like cbr1000 compared to things like step through scooters.

    I think the top shelf stuff is more for brand identity then sales.

    Who can tell with honda these days. They make a lot of nonsense bikes like the vfr1200.

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 15 hours ago
    No.

    Just say no to pit stops.

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 17 hours ago
    WOW

    Nice comment about old days. And I love the picture. That second exhaust is very close to rider reproductive parts..LOL. This ware epic times as I can see.

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 18 hours ago

    As DE stated in the article, the riders are justifiably unhappy about the lack of run-off at Suzuka. Machine variety at Montjuich was a big attraction, but by 1979 the track was about as forgiving as a bullring - and the race was marred by the death of a marshal who was hit while tending a fallen Laverda rider who had broken his leg after hitting some architectural stonework.
    IMHO it might revitalize WSBK to incorporate endurance rounds (or the WEC itself) into the series. Requiring identical engines for both long and short races might even bring costs down.
    And we'd also lose the hated headlight decals!

  • Editor's Blog: Putting Suzuka Back On The Map   1 day 19 hours ago

    David, this may be wishful thinking, but does it not seem like the RCV213-RS is a prototype for the new Fireblade?

    Honda is serious about their racing, and the aging Fireblade is hampering all of their production racing efforts worldwide (AMA, BSB, WSBK, WEC, etc).

    The RCV213-RS, as a standalone "premium" bike, makes no sense. It is far too expensive and and exotic to be a track bike, but is also completely useless as a street bike without the track-only kit (less HP than a CBR600RR).

    So, why did Honda make it, and try to sell it to the wealthy?

    My guess is to offset the costs of producing a prototype for a radically new Fireblade based on the RCV213.

    Normally, a factory like Honda can do this in house, but it's rare that you get such a radical change from one model to the next. It helps to have a transition in the form of a prototype to validate your ideas. And hey, why not sell off a few to make back the money spent on R&D?

    This may be wishful thinking, but I believe the new Fireblade will be based on the RCV213-RS.

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