Moto2

2018 Valencia Moto2 FP2 Result: Things Going Swimmingly For Lecuona

No one had it easy today and the intermediate class did not escape the downpour, ending the day in some of the worst conditions yet. Iker Lecuona had no complaints as he retrieved the top position he ended FP1 in and it was Joe Roberts’ turn to do the chasing. The American did an excellent job of it and the duo carried on a faraway battle, Roberts claiming the lead for the mid part of the session and Lecuona snatching it back for the final ten minutes.

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2018 Valencia Moto2 FP1 Result: No Sunshine But Lecuona Shines

The still firmly drenched tarmac had started to allow some more speed toward the end of the premier class session but sparse drops of rain threatened the start of the already delayed Moto2 outing once again. Joe Roberts found his way to the top of the timesheets before the downpour threatened to stop play once again. The action continued with on and off rain and Iker Lecuona got his time in the limelight for the final ten minutes, when he set a sequence of red hot laps to chase down Roberts.

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Tom's Tech Treasures: Preparing MotoGP Bikes For Sepang's Tropical Heat


Air cooling system on Kalex (Marc VDS), for water
Peter Bom: Moto2 engines automatically enrich the fuel mixture over 80°C in order to cool the engine. This rich mixture causes a slight loss of power and in the extremely tight Moto2 class, every detail is worth looking at. Here we see the MarcVDS team, cooling down there Moto2 engines while the bike waits in the pit box.


Air duct for front calipers (Yamaha YZR-M1)
Peter Bom: Air ducts to guide air to the brake caliper, and no covers over the carbon brake disks. Carbon brakes have a fixed temperature window in which they operate well. Too low and they don’t work (very low coefficient of friction), too high and they get damaged.

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Grand Prix Commission Close Down More Electronics Loopholes

The Grand Prix Commission is to tighten the noose on electronics a little further, in an attempt to prevent cheating. The GPC today issued a press release containing the minutes of their meeting held at the Malaysian Grand Prix in Sepang. There, they agreed restrictions on the ECU, agreed to limit riders in all classes to FIM homologated helmets, and increased the penalty for speeding in pit lane.

The two changes to the electronics are aimed at restricting the ability of teams to alter the data on the official ECU. The first change allows the Technical Director to use an official approved laptop to download the data directly from the datalogger on the bike, connected to the ECU, rather than relying on the team to provide the data. By downloading the data directly, the idea is to ensure that the data has not been altered for whatever reason.

The issue for the teams is that their data is then stored on a computer outside their control. To ensure that such data does not leak to their rivals, a safeguard has been put in place to have the data deleted once it has been verified by Technical Control.

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