Alvaro Bautista

Deciphering The Inscrutable - MotoGP Silly Season Review, Part 1

If you think that silly season has been a bit quiet this year, you'd be right. Normally by now, we would have passed through the stage of outrageous fabrication, left the wildly inaccurate rumors behind us, and be well into probable rider signing scenarios. This year, the annual merry-go-round has barely registered, with very little sign of who may end up where for the 2016 season.

Of course, for the most part, this is because all of the factory seats bar the second slots at Aprilia and Ducati are already spoken for in 2016. Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo, Marc Márquez, Dani Pedrosa, Andrea Dovizioso, Aleix Espargaro, and Alvaro Bautista all have contracts for next year. Maverick Viñales' seat at Suzuki is safe through 2017. Of the currently active factory riders, only Andrea Iannone's contract could be ended after 2015, but Ducati will be keeping the Italian for 2016 as well. The only truly vacant seat is the one at Aprilia vacated by Marco Melandri, who never really wanted to be in MotoGP anyway.

With no factory seats available – or rather, with no truly desirable factory seats available – options to move up the MotoGP food chain are limited. Teams, too, are reluctant. 2016 sees the return of Michelin and the advent of spec software, making teams wary of changing too many variables at one time. Better to stick with the rider you know, whose data you already have and understand, and who has a solid relationship with the crew chief and team, rather than get a new rider in and spend a lot of time and effort trying to figure out whether problems are down to the rider or adapting the bike to the new technical regulations.

2015 Sachsenring MotoGP Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the teams, Bridgestone and sponsors after this weekend's German Grand Prix at the Sachsenring:


Round Number: 
9
Year: 
2015

2015 Sachsenring MotoGP Saturday Round Up: Why The Hondas Are Fast, And Who Can Stop Marquez Or Kent

Is the run of Yamaha domination about to come to an end? After winning seven out of eight races, the Yamaha YZR-M1 certainly looks like the best bike on the grid, so on paper, it should continue to crush the opposition beneath its wheels at the Sachsenring. After all, the strength of the Yamaha is its ability to carry corner speed and get drive out of corners, and the Sachsenring has barely a straight line in its 3.7 kilometers. Yet after two days of practice, it has been the Hondas which have ruled the roost in Germany. The bike which is supposed to have problems looks untouchable, with Marc Márquez looking untouchable, Dani Pedrosa the best of the rest, and both Scott Redding and Cal Crutchlow showing real promise.

Why is the Honda so fast at the Sachsenring? Two reasons. Firstly, the circuit only has a couple of the types of corners where the Honda has struggled. It is only in Turn 8 and Turn 12 where the riders are braking almost straight up and down, the rear stepping out and becoming difficult to control. "Where we have a problem here is only two corners," Marc Márquez said at the press conference. "The rest is just with the gas, and there we don't have the problem." Those other corners are where the Hondas are making up the time. And they are making up the time because the track lacks grip.

One of the enigmas which we in the media center have been struggling with is whether the Honda does better in cold weather or in hot weather. But after much discussion with a bunch of people who are much smarter than we are, we came to the conclusion that the temperature of the track is irrelevant. It is not whether it is hot or cold that matters to the Honda, but whether the track actually has any grip. On a good track with plenty of grip, the Yamahas can carry corner speed and use the excellent mechanical grip of the bike to their advantage, and make a break. If such a track then also has a lot of sharp corners, where the Honda riders are struggling to control the rear under braking, and get it to slide controllably, then the Yamaha simply walks away, as do the Ducatis, and perhaps even the underpowered Suzukis. All three of those bikes can exploit mechanical grip, to carry corner speed and get drive as the riders lift the bike up from the edge of the tire into the traction area, where it can dig in and push the bike forward.

2015 Sachsenring MotoGP Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the teams, Bridgestone and sponsors after qualifying at the Sachsenring:

Round Number: 
9
Year: 
2015

2015 Sachsenring MotoGP Preview Press Releases

Press release previews from the MotoGP teams, Bridgestone and others:

Round Number: 
9
Year: 
2015

2015 Assen MotoGP Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the teams and Bridgestone after Saturday's exhilarating Dutch TT at Assen:

Round Number: 
8
Year: 
2015

2015 Assen MotoGP Friday Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and others after qualifying at Assen:

Round Number: 
8
Year: 
2015

2015 Assen MotoGP Preview Press Releases

Press releases from the teams, Bridgestone and others previewing the Dutch TT at Assen:

Round Number: 
8
Year: 
2015

2015 Barcelona Saturday MotoGP Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams after qualifying at Barcelona:

Round Number: 
7
Year: 
2015

2015 Barcelona Friday MotoGP Post-Practice Press Releases

Press releases from the teams and Bridgestone after the first day of practice at Barcelona:

Round Number: 
7
Year: 
2015

2015 Barcelona MotoGP Preview Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone ahead of this weekend's round at Barcelona:

Round Number: 
7
Year: 
2015

The Slow Decline Of The Honda RC213V - The Lessons Of Stefan Bradl And Alvaro Bautista

Last year, Marc Márquez won the first ten races of the season on his way to his second successive MotoGP championship. He ended the season with a grand total of thirteen wins, eventually tying up the title at Motegi, with three races still to go. He could have wrapped it up a race earlier, had he not crashed trying to keep pace with Valentino Rossi at Misano. Márquez and the Honda RC213V reigned supreme, clearly the best package on the grid.

Eight months later, and Márquez trails the championship leader Rossi by 49 points, having won only one race, and taken one other podium finish at Jerez. Márquez has crashed out of two races, nearly crashing out of a third as well, and is 101 points down on his total after the same number of races last year. The Honda RC213V is being universally blamed for Márquez' decline, with a series of crashes by Cal Crutchlow, Scott Redding and Dani Pedrosa also being put down to an overloaded front end. The question on everyone's lips is, how did the RC213V go from being the best bike on the grid to being behind the Yamaha and the Ducati? How could Honda get it so badly wrong in just a few short months?

The answer to that question is, of course, that they didn't. There is clearly a problem with the Honda – the obvious culprit being an overabundance of horsepower and aggressive engine braking – but it is hardly a terrible motorcycle. The bike is still faster than it was last year, race times dropping on average by over a second. But the problems Honda are facing did not happen overnight. The supremacy of Márquez has masked a slow and steady decline of the RC213V, the bike losing its advantage over the past couple of seasons.

2015 Mugello MotoGP Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after Sunday's race at Mugello:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2015

2015 Mugello MotoGP Saturday Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams after qualifying at Mugello:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2015

2015 Mugello MotoGPPreview Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone ahead of this weekend's Italian GP at Mugello:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2015
Syndicate content

GTranslate