Kawasaki

2015 Misano World Superbike Sunday Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizers and the teams after Sunday's races at Misano:

Round Number: 
8
Year: 
2015

2015 Misano World Superbike Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases after qualifying at Misano from the teams and series organizers:

Round Number: 
8
Year: 
2015

2015 Misano World Superbike Preview Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizers and World Superbike and World Supersport teams ahead of this weekend's WSBK round at Misano:

Round Number: 
8
Year: 
2015

2015 Portimao World Superbike Test Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizers and some of the teams after Monday's World Superbike test at Portimao:

Year: 
2015

2015 Portimao World Superbike Sunday Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizers and the World Superbike and World Supersport teams after the Portuguese round of WSBK:

Round Number: 
7
Year: 
2015

2015 Portimao World Superbike Saturday Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizers and teams after qualifying for tomorrow's World Superbike round at Portimao:

Round Number: 
7
Year: 
2015

2015 Portimao World Superbike Press Release Previews

Press release previews of this weekend's World Superbike round at Portimao:

Round Number: 
7
Year: 
2015

2015 Mugello MotoGP Saturday Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams after qualifying at Mugello:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2015

The Editor's Opinion: How Heroes And Villains Can Help Save World Superbikes

Sunday was a pretty good day for British motorcycle racing fans. The first four finishers in both World Superbike races were British riders, and wildcard Kyle Ryde rode a thrilling and aggressive race to finish on the podium in his first ever World Supersport race. And yet less than 16,000 spectators turned up to Donington Park to watch the action. When you factor in the creative mathematics which goes into generating spectator numbers at sporting events (motorcycle racing is not alone in this), and then take a wild stab at the number of attendees on some form of freebie or other, then the actual quantity of punters who handed over cold, hard cash for a ticket is likely to be disappointingly low.

Once upon a time, British fans flocked to Brands Hatch to watch WSBK. Though the claims of 100,000 at the Kent track are almost certainly a wild exaggeration, there is no doubt that the circuit was packed. Fans thronged at every fence, filling every open patch of ground to watch their heroes in combat. So what went wrong?

If only World Superbikes were racing at Brands again, British fans say. Frankly, I think the fond memories of Brands were colored in large part by the fact that WSBK visited Brands in August, when the chances of a hot, sunny summer day are much better than the Midlands in the middle of May. Good weather is a proven draw for any outdoors sporting event, and motorcycle racing is no different.

But a spot of sunshine and a few degrees of temperature can't explain the massive drop in attendance over the past fifteen years. There has always been a very strong British presence in World Superbikes, and the Brit contingent is now stronger than ever. But still the crowds stay away. The racing is excellent: fans often compare the WSBK races favorably to MotoGP, in terms of close battles and unpredictable winners. So that can't be it either. The bikes are perhaps not as trick as they were ten years ago, the formula simplified in pursuit of cost-cutting. Justifiably so: this is supposed to be production racing, after all, and not prototypes in disguise. The balance is pretty good, though. Five of the series' eight manufacturers got on the podium last year, four of them racking up wins.

Great racing, great riders, home talent to cheer for, and yet the stands are only sparsely filled. BSB, the series where most of the current crop of World Superbike riders came from, races less sophisticated bikes, held its round back in April, when the weather is even less dependable, yet drew twice as many fans to the track as WSBK did. What is their secret? How come BSB is thriving while WSBK is in the doldrums?

2015 Donington Park World Superbike Sunday Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizers and some of the teams after Sunday's World Superbike and World Supersport races at Donington Park:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2015

2015 Donington Park World Superbike Saturday Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the teams and series organizers after qualifying at Donington Park:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2015

2015 Donington Park World Superbike Press Release Previews

Press release previews from the WSBK teams and series organizers ahead of this weekend's World Superbike round at Donington Park:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2015

The Racing Week On Wednesday - News Round Up For The Week Of 13th Of May

It is ironic that now we are getting into the meat of the motorcycle racing season, there should be so little news to speak of. But perhaps it is a matter of perspective: there is plenty of real news to be found in motorcycle racing, but it is to be found and read where you would expect to find it, in the middle of every race weekend. That is especially true now that MotoGP and World Superbikes have returned to a more fan-friendly schedule, the two world championships alternating weekends again, with BSB, the CEV and MotoAmerica filling in any gaps when they appear.

Then again, at this stage of the season, all of the focus is on the coming races, rather than next year. It is too early for silly season, especially as all the factory rides are locked up for 2016, and even Jorge Lorenzo's option to leave early removed. There are plenty of attractive seats to be filled for 2016: the contracts of both Monster Tech 3 Yamaha riders are up at the end of the year, Cal Crutchlow is on a one-year contract, Yonny Hernandez has a one-year deal at Pramac, and the seats at Forward and Aspar are all being filled by riders with one-year contracts. Speculation about those seats will only start in earnest around mid-season, once team managers have half a season's worth of results to start drawing conclusions, and see who might be available to make the move up from Moto2.

2015 Imola World Superbike Sunday Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizer and the World Superbike and World Supersport teams after Sunday's races at Imola:

Round Number: 
5
Year: 
2015

2015 Imola World Superbike Saturday Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizer and from some of the teams after qualifying for Sunday's World Superbike and World Supersport races at Imola:

Round Number: 
5
Year: 
2015
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