Valencia, Spain

2015 Valencia Post-Race Test Times 12 Noon: Marquez Fastest As 2016 Begins

Testing is underway for the 2016 of MotoGP, the bikes rolling out on Michelin tires with official timing for the first time. Lap times are quick, Marc Marquez already lapping around the race record, the performance of the Michelins up to par. But there are still issues: Marquez crashed at Turn 3, losing the front at a corner where crashes are extremely rare on just his fourth lap out of the pits. Cal Crutchlow has also crashed, going down at Turn 5, again losing the front.

The bikes out are a fair mixture, with Suzuki and Ducati sticking to their own electronics for the first day, while the other manufacturers have switched to the 2016 spec software. All of the riders have already gone out, Valentino Rossi being the late arrival, as is his custom at a test. Rossi is in his garage, and due to go out soon.


2015 Valencia Sunday MotoGP Round Up: How Championships Are Won, Lost, And Destroyed

They say that truth is stranger than fiction. The more pressing question is how to distinguish between the two. Narratives are easily created – it is my stock in trade, and the trade which every sports writer plies – but where does stringing together a collection of related facts move from being a factual reconstruction into the realms of invented fantasy? When different individuals view the same facts and draw radically opposite conclusions, are we to believe that one is delusional and the other is sane and objective? Most of all, how much value should we attach to the opinions of each side? Do we change our opinion of the facts based on our sympathy or antipathy for the messenger?

That is the confusion which the final round of MotoGP has thrust the world of Grand Prix racing into. What should have been a celebration of the greatest season of racing in the premier class in recent years, and possibly ever, was rendered farcical, as two competing interpretations of a single set of facts clashed, exploded, then dragged the series down into the abyss. Bitterness, anger, suspicion, fear, all of these overshadowed some astonishing performances, by both winners and losers. Looked at impartially, the Valencia round of MotoGP was a great day of fantastic racing. But who now can look at it impartially?

2015 Valencia MotoGP Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after the final race of 2015 at Valencia:

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2015 Valencia Moto2 And Moto3 Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the teams in the Moto2 and Moto3 classes:

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2015 MotoGP Championship Standings After Round 18, Valencia, Spain

MotoGP Championship standings for round 18, 2015

2015 Valencia MotoGP Race Results: Edge Of Your Seat

Cal Crutchlow's bike had issues on the grid and was walked to the pits and he would start from the last place, gifting Valentino Rossi one place at the back of the grid.

2015 Moto2 Championship Standings After Round 18, Valencia, Spain

Championship standings for round 18, 2015

2015 Valencia Moto2 Race Results: Red Flagged Race Restarted

The Moto2 race was red-flagged after a mid-pack pileup on turn two of lap one and would be restarted as an eighteen lap race.

2015 Moto3 Championship Standings After Round 18, Valencia, Spain

Championship standings for round 18, 2015

2015 Valencia Moto3 Race Results: Done And Dusted

The title still to be decided, Miguel Oliveira needed to win and have Danny Kent finish fifteenth or lower to take the title.

Scott Jones Shoots The Grand Finale: Saturday Photos From Valencia

Andrea Iannone gives a practical demonstration of the phrase "bury the front"

The Little Samurai. Valentino Rossi will be cheering him on come Sunday afternoon

Time to go

2015 Valencia Moto2 Warm Up: Luthi Holds Off Rabat And Rins


2015 Valencia MotoGP Saturday Round Up: A Brilliant Pole Lap, And A Wide Open Championship

There is nowhere left to hide. On Sunday, it is time for the men and women of Grand Prix racing to stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, and lend their eyes a terrible aspect. Much is at stake: a Moto3 title that really should have been wrapped up by now; a MotoGP title rendered complicated by the impetuosity of youth and old age; and just sheer thirst for glory in Moto2. Glory is what is at stake in all three classes, what young men and women dedicate their lives and sacrifice their bodies and their time to chasing. Sweet victory is there for the lucky few, the bitter draught of defeat for the rest.

It looked like the cards had already been dealt ahead of Sunday's race when the Court of Arbitration for Sport rejected Valentino Rossi's request to have his three penalty points suspended. Then Rossi came out swinging on Friday and Saturday, not his usual eight or ninth times, and a struggle to make it through to Q2, but strong pace from the outset and competitive times. "I've been impressed with how fast he's going," Nicky Hayden said of Rossi after qualifying today. "He's looked very solid. We know he's a nine-time champion because he's fast on Sunday, but he's come out of the gate, might not be breaking track records, but compared to a normal Friday, Saturday, he's looking strong."

Then came qualifying. Rossi had earned passage to Q2 by right, and had told us on Friday he would be treating qualifying the same as he had every weekend, pushing hard for a fast lap. Rossi seemed to have the upper hand going into Q2, especially as Jorge Lorenzo was clearly suffering with nerves. He forgot to take off a tear off in the pits, then spent long seconds trying to sort it out with his assistant, before finally leaving the pits in a bit of a fluster. Not a good omen, we all thought.

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