Sepang, Malaysia

Brembo Brakes: Santi Hernandez On Marc Marquez, Braking Style, And Why Scooter Brakes Are The Future

MotoGP remains a prototype racing series, despite the increasing use of spec components. In 2009, MotoGP switched to a single tire supplier, a spec ECU in 2014, and spec software in 2016. Bore and stroke, and the number of cylinders are specified, meaning that all six manufacturers in MotoGP use four-cylinder 1000cc engines with an 81mm bore.

Despite the fact that so much of the rest of the bike design is unregulated, some components become almost de facto spec. The choice of brake component suppliers is completely free, and yet every MotoGP bike on the grid is fitted with parts that come exclusively from Brembo, the Italian brake manufacturer which dominates the sport, on both two wheels and four.

At Brno, I had the chance to talk to two people with intimate knowledge of Brembo's braking components: Andrea Pellegrini, chief engineer for Brembo inside the MotoGP paddock, and Santi Hernandez, crew chief for world champion Marc Márquez in the Repsol Honda team. Pellegrini provided the perspective from the side of the brake manufacturer, while Hernandez gave an insight from the end users' point of view.

New tires, different braking styles

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Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Lorenzo's battle back from injury - against his subconscious

What’s wrong with Jorge Lorenzo? Has he lost it or is he merely waiting till his back is fully fixed? And why HRC’s plans for its 2020 RC213V should give cause for optimism

The MotoGP paddock and fans around the world are agog with talk of Jorge Lorenzo. What’s up with the three-times MotoGP world champion? Has he lost it? Why doesn’t he retire? Why hasn’t he been sacked? Why don’t they put Johann Zarco on his bikes?

It must be said that the three-times MotoGP king is in a hole. A very deep hole. At Phillip Island two weeks ago he finished more than a minute (one minute!) behind winning team-mate Marc Márquez.

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Sepang MotoGP Subscriber Notes: Pace Counts, Consistency Counts, Why Dovizioso Was the Problem, And Crashes And Clashes

Editor's note: Three back-to-back weekends of Asia-Pacific flyaways have proved to be punishing in terms of disrupted sleep patterns. As a result, I am reverting to writing a brief set of Subscriber notes for Sepang, with a full race report to follow by the end of the day tomorrow.

In these subscriber notes:

  • How Maverick Viñales won
  • What Marc Márquez coming second means for MotoGP
  • Fabio Quartararo's weaknesses, to add to his strengths
  • Why it was Dovizioso, not Ducati, that was a problem for Valentino Rossi
  • Why Rossi is a problem for Yamaha
  • The clashes between Alex Rins and Jack Miller, and Joan Mir and Johann Zarco, whether the punishment fit the crime, and the role the track played
  • The future of Johann Zarco

Stability matters

Fabio Quartararo may have got all the headlines at Sepang on Friday and Saturday, but it was obvious to anyone who studied the timesheets that Maverick Viñales had the best pace in practice, and by a significant margin. Viñales' pace in practice was two to three tenths better than anyone else.

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