Sachsenring, Germany

Scott Jones In Saxony: Race Day At The Sachsenring


The return of the king


Jorge Lorenzo put up a brave defense, before having to admit defeat


Tito Rabat found himself being taken out by Franco Morbidelli in the last corner

Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - How tyres could decide the 2015 MotoGP title

MotoMatters.com is delighted to feature the work of iconic MotoGP writer Mat Oxley. Oxley is a former racer, TT winner and highly respected author of biographies of world champions Mick Doohan and Valentino Rossi, and currently writes for Motor Sport Magazine, where he is MotoGP correspondent. We are featuring sections from Oxley's blogs, which are posted in full on the Motor Sport Magazine website.


How tyres could decide the 2015 MotoGP title

Let’s do some maths: nine races gone and nine to go, so it’s halfway time when we get to examine the past with the benefit of 20/20 hindsight and pretend we’ve got even the slightest clue about what’s going to happen next.

If we take Sunday’s German GP and extrapolate that result all the way to Valencia, Marc Márquez will record a famous comeback world-title victory. However, if Márquez, Valentino Rossi and Jorge Lorenzo each win three of the remaining nine races, while recording podium finishes in the other six, then Rossi will most likely make history with a 10th world title, 18 years after his first. The possibilities are endless, of course, though it might be fun if someone fed the data into a supercomputer. Please be my guest…

Bridgestone Press Release: Shinji Aoki Talks Asymmetric Tires At Sachsenring, And Looks Ahead To Phillip Island

Bridgestone issued their customary post-race press debrief after the German round of MotoGP, in which there was a lot of talk of tires. Especially the front: with four different compounds/constructions, there was plenty of work for the teams to do. In the press release, Shinji Aoki talks about the evolution of the asymmetric tire, and its use in future races.


German MotoGP™ debrief with Shinji Aoki
Tuesday, July 14 2015

Bridgestone slick options: Front: Soft, Asymmetric Front, Medium & Hard; Rear: Soft, Medium & Hard (Asymmetric)
Bridgestone wet tyre options: Soft (Main), Hard (Alternative)

For the third successive year the German Grand Prix was won by Repsol Honda Team’s Marc Marquez who took a comfortable victory over teammate Dani Pedrosa and Movistar Yamaha MotoGP’s Valentino Rossi who crossed the finish line in second and third place respectively.

This year’s German Grand Prix saw Marquez beat all of the circuit records as he set a new Circuit Best Lap record (1’20.336) in qualifying, a new Circuit Record Lap (1'21.530) on lap 10 of the race, while the overall race time (41'01.087) beat the old record by eleven seconds.

Round Number: 
9
Year: 
2015

2015 Sachsenring MotoGP Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the teams, Bridgestone and sponsors after this weekend's German Grand Prix at the Sachsenring:


Round Number: 
9
Year: 
2015

2015 Sachsenring Moto2 And Moto3 Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the teams after the Sachsenring races:


Round Number: 
9
Year: 
2015

2015 MotoGP Championship Standings After Round 9, Sachsenring, Germany

MotoGP Championship standings for round 9, 2015

2015 Moto2 Championship Standings After Round 9, Sachsenring, Germany

Championship standings for round 9, 2015

2015 Sachsenring Moto2 Race Result: Short Laps, No Straights

Twenty nine short laps away from the summer break, Moto2 took place in good racing weather.

2015 Moto3 Championship Standings After Round 9, Sachsenring, Germany

Championship standings for round 9, 2015

2015 Sachsenring Moto3 Race Result: Half The Series Raced

After a reorganised grid, with the shenanigans of qualifying sorted out, would the shuffle affect the race result?

2015 Sachsenring Moto2 Warm Up Result: Zarco Leads Again

Results:

2015 Sachsenring Moto3 Warm Up Result: Kent Leads, Gap Closes

Results:

2015 Sachsenring MotoGP Saturday Round Up: Why The Hondas Are Fast, And Who Can Stop Marquez Or Kent

Is the run of Yamaha domination about to come to an end? After winning seven out of eight races, the Yamaha YZR-M1 certainly looks like the best bike on the grid, so on paper, it should continue to crush the opposition beneath its wheels at the Sachsenring. After all, the strength of the Yamaha is its ability to carry corner speed and get drive out of corners, and the Sachsenring has barely a straight line in its 3.7 kilometers. Yet after two days of practice, it has been the Hondas which have ruled the roost in Germany. The bike which is supposed to have problems looks untouchable, with Marc Márquez looking untouchable, Dani Pedrosa the best of the rest, and both Scott Redding and Cal Crutchlow showing real promise.

Why is the Honda so fast at the Sachsenring? Two reasons. Firstly, the circuit only has a couple of the types of corners where the Honda has struggled. It is only in Turn 8 and Turn 12 where the riders are braking almost straight up and down, the rear stepping out and becoming difficult to control. "Where we have a problem here is only two corners," Marc Márquez said at the press conference. "The rest is just with the gas, and there we don't have the problem." Those other corners are where the Hondas are making up the time. And they are making up the time because the track lacks grip.

One of the enigmas which we in the media center have been struggling with is whether the Honda does better in cold weather or in hot weather. But after much discussion with a bunch of people who are much smarter than we are, we came to the conclusion that the temperature of the track is irrelevant. It is not whether it is hot or cold that matters to the Honda, but whether the track actually has any grip. On a good track with plenty of grip, the Yamahas can carry corner speed and use the excellent mechanical grip of the bike to their advantage, and make a break. If such a track then also has a lot of sharp corners, where the Honda riders are struggling to control the rear under braking, and get it to slide controllably, then the Yamaha simply walks away, as do the Ducatis, and perhaps even the underpowered Suzukis. All three of those bikes can exploit mechanical grip, to carry corner speed and get drive as the riders lift the bike up from the edge of the tire into the traction area, where it can dig in and push the bike forward.

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