Austin, Texas

2017 Provisional MotoGP Calendar - Almost Identical to 2016

There is a current fashion in moviemaking, of taking proven formulas from the past, giving them a light makeover and then relaunching them, then trying to spice them up by referring to them as a "reboot" or "reloaded". Dorna executives must have been to see Ghostbusters, Mad Max, and many more, as the 2017 MotoGP calendar is best described as 2016 Reloaded.

The 2017 MotoGP calendar is almost identical to the 2016 calendar, with a couple of minor tweaks. Those tweaks are a clear improvement on 2016: there are fewer large gaps, and there are fewer back-to-back races. There have been some changes to help with logistics, and some to help with race organizations. 

LCR Honda in Running For Final 2017 MotoGP Grid Slot

The MotoGP grid is set to expand to 24 riders once again in 2017. The current teams are expected to retain the 21 grid slots already allotted, while KTM's factory team will take two more when the Austrian manufacturer enters MotoGP next year. This will take the grand total up to 23 seats, leaving one more grid slot to be filled.

Who will fill that final grid slot has been the subject of much speculation. Rumors that the Sky VR46 team were to take the slot were immediately quashed by team manager Pablo Nieto, saying they were only interested in Moto3 and Moto2. Sources indicate that there are two firm candidates, with three more having expressed an interest. The two candidates include one MotoGP team, and one Moto2 team.

The MotoGP team interested in expanding is LCR. The Monaco-based team ran two bikes in 2015, but sponsorship woes had forced them to cut back to just a single bike for the 2016 season. When asked if he was interested the final grid slot, team boss Lucio Cecchinello acknowledged that he was, and that he was working towards securing sufficient budget to meet the submission deadline on 29th April. "Honestly speaking, at the moment we do not have the budget, but we are talking with our existing sponsors and with some new potential sponsors," Cecchinello told MotoMatters.com. "Realistically, it's very hard that I will be able to put it all together. But until the last day and the last hour, I will not give up."

Suzuki Private Test: On Progress with the 2016 Chassis, and Examining Viñales' Contract Situation

On the Monday after the Austin round of MotoGP, the Suzuki team stayed on to do an extra private test. Aleix Espargaro and Maverick Viñales had hoped to start relatively early, but heavy overnight rain left the track both wet and dirty, taking some time to dry out. When they did start, the times were poor – around 2'08, rather than the 2'05s both riders had been posting in the race. But conditions improved as the day went on, and the session turned into a very productive test for both riders.

After two race on back-to-back weekends, there was little time to be testing new parts. Both men had some new electronics to try, aimed at helping the seamless gearbox be a little smoother. They also both tried the 2016 chassis again, after having spent the first three races on the 2015. Aleix Espargaro was not entirely convinced, saying the frame was stiffer, but it was also less agile. That meant balancing braking stability against cornering ability. For Espargaro, the time lost in the corners would not be made up on the brakes, certainly not in qualifying.

Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Why MotoGP is going backwards

Why MotoGP is going backwards

There’s very little all the factories agree on, but engine rotation is one of them

After sunshine, rain and fresh air, my favourite natural phenomenon is gyroscopic effect. This is because we wouldn’t be able to ride motorcycles without it. If you don’t believe me, try this next time you’re out riding: when you stop at a traffic light, don’t put your feet down. (And don’t send me the bill.)

A motorcycle’s spinning wheels create gyroscopic effect that keeps the machine going straight. The more speed, the more gyro and the more stability. This is all good, unless you are racing. Most racers don’t give a hoot about straight-line stability: they’re happy to hold on like gorillas on the straights, just so long as the bike will turn left or right in the blink of an eye.

2016 Austin Moto2 & Moto3 Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the Moto2 and Moto3 teams after the Grand Prix of the Americas in Austin:


Third consecutive podium for Binder

Red Bull KTM Ajo rider takes third place at the Red Bull Grand Prix of The Americas on last lap. Bo Bendsneyder completes the race twenty-second.

04/10/2016 - Circuit of the Americas, Austin, USA

2016 Austin MotoGP Sunday Round Up: Imperious Marquez, Complex Crashes, and Intrigue in the Support Classes

If the big question at the Circuit of the Americas was "Who can beat Marc Márquez?" then we found out the answer on Sunday: Nobody. There were only two brief moments during which Márquez was not leading the MotoGP race. Off the line, Jorge Lorenzo was a fraction quicker going into Turn 1, but Márquez turned earlier and already had the lead on the exit. Lorenzo tried once more into the hairpin of Turn 11, but overshot and ran wide, Márquez taking back the lead immediately.

After that, Márquez was gone. Andrea Dovizioso and Jorge Lorenzo kept Márquez honest for a couple of laps, but the Repsol Honda rider's relentless pace forced them to concede. Márquez went on to win his fourth straight Grand Prix of the Americas, and his tenth straight win in the United States of America. Since ascending to MotoGP, he has never been beaten on American soil.

There are plenty of adjectives you could throw at Márquez' performance – imperious, dominant, superlative – but perhaps the best word to sum up Marc Márquez at the Circuit of the Americas is "Unbeatable." His rivals will have to wait another year to try to find a way of stopping him.

Pages

Subscribe to Austin, Texas