September 11th, 2015

2015 Misano Moto2 FP2 Result: Rabat Sets New Record Ahead of Aegerter And Baldassarri

Tito Rabat set a new quickest Moto2 time on his way to the top spot, holding off Dominique Aegerter, Lorenzo Baldassarri and Sam Lowes to within two tenths of a second. 

The top nine riders all set times quicker than their morning times.


2015 Misano MotoGP FP2 Result: Lorenzo Sets New Record Flying Ahead Of Marquez

Using Ducati-like wings on his Yamaha M1, Jorge Lorenzo set a new quickest time around Misano, with a 1'32.871, a twentieth of a second quicker than Marc Marquez. Dani Pedrosa and Andrea Dovizioso were both under a half a second behind Lorenzo's new record time.


2015 Misano Moto3 FP2 Result: Kent Hits His Stride

Championship leader Danny Kent posted a late fast lap to go quickest on his last lap of the afternoon session, beating the morning's quickest times set by Enea Bastianini and Romano Fenati, and the afternoon times from Niccolò Antonelli and Miguel Antonelli, neither of whom could match the times set in the first session.


2015 Misano Moto2 FP1 Result: Corsi Edges Zarco


Provisional 2016 MotoGP Calendar Released: Austria In, Indy Out, Silverstone Moved

The FIM today released a provisional calendar for MotoGP in 2016, featuring much that was expected and a few surprises. The calendar will once again have 18 races, with Indianapolis dropped and Austria taking its place. The biggest change in the calendar is the moving of the British Grand Prix at Silverstone, which vacates its late August slot for the middle of July.

That move, and the scheduling of Austria and Brno back to back, will not be popular with the circuits. The British MotoGP round comes just three weeks after the F1 race at Silverstone, due to be held at the end of June. Silverstone will fear that having the two biggest events of the year in the space of a month will mean that they cannibalize attendance, with spectators choosing to attend either F1 or MotoGP. When there were two months between the two races, the chances of fans attending both were greater.

As for Brno and Austria, the Brno circuit feared that having Austria a week before their race would see German fans choosing to go to Austria rather than Brno, with an impact on attendance. So far, though, Dorna has prevailed in discussions.

2015 Misano MotoGP FP1 Result: Marquez Holds Off Lorenzo And Pirro On Fresh Tarmac

Marc Marquez and Jorge Lorenzo ended the session within a tenth of a second of each other while Ducati test rider Michele Pirro, in his second race of the year, was third quickest, showing the advantage of Ducati's frequent testing at this track. 

The top ten riders were within one second of Marquez's time.


2015 Misano Moto3 FP1 Result: Bastianini And Fenati Break In New Asphalt

Enea Bastianini and Romano Fenati got the Misano Moto3 weekend off to a good start, leading the way on the new asphalt to top the first session of free practice. Brad Binder ended the session in 3rd, while championship leader Danny Kent ended the first session in 7th, a second off the pace of Bastianini. 

The session was red-flagged after a horrific crash involving Lorenzo Dalla Porta and Jorge Navarro, with Navarro falling from his bike and being hit by Dalla Porta down the back straight, where Shoya Tomizawa was struck in a fatal incident in 2010. Fortunately, Navarro came away much better, remaining conscious and suffering a shoulder injury. He was transported to a local hospital for further check ups and a CAT scan.


September 10th

2015 Misano Thursday MotoGP Round Up: New Asphalt, Hidden Benefits And A Tough Dilemma For Laverty

There was a sense of eager anticipation at Misano on Thursday. For the past five years, the riders have complained more and more of the poor surface, of bumps, of a lack of grip, and of asphalt polished as smooth as pebbles on a beach. The new surface is a vast improvement, incredibly grippy, most of the bumps ironed out and fresh dark asphalt ready to welcome sticky rubber. Racing at Misano will be a much more rewarding experience than it has been in the past.

Just how much better is the new surface? Aleix Espargaro said that the Suzukis had lapped a second under the lap record, while Marc Márquez had been untouchable, lapping "nearly three seconds under the record." That seemed almost improbably fast, and a quick survey among the rest of the paddock suggested Márquez' time was not quite that quick, but at 1'31.9 impressive nonetheless. That is fully two seconds quicker than the race lap record, and a second under the pole record. On a scorching hot surface with track temperatures of over 60°, that is a very impressive time.

Track temperatures could be an issue, as Dani Pedrosa explained. "Because the asphalt is super black it got so hot, it started sweating," he said. The surface is so dark that it absorbs more heat than other, lighter-colored surfaces, meaning that track temperatures rise more quickly and get hotter overall. But with temperatures this weekend expected to be closer to normal, around 29° on Sunday, excessive heat should not be a problem.

2015 Misano MotoGP Preview Press Releases

Press release previews from the MotoGP teams:

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2015 Misano Moto2 And Moto3 Preview Press Releases

Press release previews:

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2015 Misano MotoGP Preview: Rossi vs Lorenzo, And The Advantage Of Testing

The key to success in motorcycle racing is in finding advantage wherever you can, and exploiting it to the fullest. If you are stronger in acceleration than your rivals, then you make sure you get out of the corner first and leave them for dead down the straight. If you are stronger in braking, then you wait, not just until you see God, as the old racing adage has it, but until you have seen every deity imagined by humanity since the dawn of time before slamming on the anchors. If you can turn tighter, you grab the inside line and push the other guy wide. You take what is on the table, and seize it with both hands.

So what about when you are racing in front of your home crowd? Do the cheers of your home fans push you to even greater heights? Does being willed on by tens of thousands of adoring fans spur you into taking more risks, trying harder, riding faster? Going on the number of times that an Italian has won at Mugello or Misano, or a Spaniard at Jerez, Barcelona or Valencia, that is a tempting conclusion to draw. Until you look at the other races on the calendar, and see that Spaniards and Italians have won in Australia, Japan, Britain, Holland. And that Spaniards have won in Italy, and Italians in Spain.

Still, it must count for something. Last year, Valentino Rossi rocked up at Misano with an irrepressible will to win, and cheered on by an ecstatic crowd and the entire population of his home village Tavullia, a stone's throw away, took what was arguably his best victory since 2009. Everything finally clicked into place after his return to Yamaha, and Rossi passed Jorge Lorenzo for the lead, forced Marc Márquez into a fatal mistake, and stamped his authority all over the MotoGP class at Misano.

September 8th

Everything You Wanted To Know About MotoGP's 2016 Unified Software, But Were Afraid To Ask

2016 heralds a new era for MotoGP. Two major changes take place to the technical regulations: Michelin replaces Bridgestone as the official tire supplier (for more background on that, see the interview we did at Brno with Michelin boss Piero Taramasso), and everyone will be forced to switch to the spec electronics package, managed by Dorna and developed by Magneti Marelli.

Much confusion surrounds the introduction of spec electronics. Firstly, because there are so very few people who actually understand the role of electronics in motorcycle racing, it being a dark and mysterious art for fans, media, even riders. Secondly, because the adoption of spec electronics has been a process of constant negotiation between manufacturers, Dorna and Magneti Marelli, as they try to reach a compromise which is acceptable to all parties. That has resulted in the rules being changed a number of times, with such changes not always being communicated directly or clearly to outside parties.

So where do we stand now, and what is the process? I spoke to Corrado Cecchinelli, Dorna's head of technology for MotoGP, on progress with the electronics, and especially the spec software package, ahead of the 2016 season.

The 2016 MotoGP Hardware Package

September 3rd

Bridgestone's Edge-Treated Tires: Tailor-made For Lorenzo, Or Good For Everybody?

The 2015 MotoGP championship is one of the closest in years. Close championships are always fascinating, but this one has an extra edge to it: the two men fighting over the 2015 title are both teammates, and racing on the same bike. The differences between the Yamaha M1s of Valentino Rossi and Jorge Lorenzo are virtually non-existent, their results dependent entirely on the riders themselves, and how well their teams prepare the bikes and riders for the race.

With nothing to choose between the bikes, focus has turned to the tires. Jorge Lorenzo's constant references to his preference for the tire with the special edge treatment have made this focus much keener. Under the glaring spotlight of public scrutiny, the allocation of tires which Bridgestone brings to each race has taken on the appearance of being the decisive factor in every race. Before every race weekend in MotoGP, the one question I get asked most via Social Media (other than "who do you think will win?" of course), is whether Bridgestone will be bringing the tires with the edge treatment or not.

This focus on tires is becoming so intense that a number of misconceptions about Bridgestone's rear tires are starting to arise. Some fans are starting to believe that Bridgestone are manipulating the results by bringing the special tires to some races, but not to others. They are starting to believe that tire choice is the sole deciding factor in races. They are even starting to believe that Jorge Lorenzo is the only rider who likes the tires with the edge treatment, and that those tires are an actual disadvantage for most, if not all of the other riders on the grid.

That tires have been a factor is something I have been keeping an eye on for a while. I have had numerous discussions with Bridgestone staff throughout the year, questioning them on the circumstances and process behind the tires and tire choice. At Silverstone, I also questioned a number of riders on how they feel about the tires, and whether they prefer the tires with the edge treatment, or are hindered by them in some way. Given the stakes, I did not ask Jorge Lorenzo or Valentino Rossi about it, but instead got a range of riders with different manufacturers to give their opinions.

September 2nd

Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Rossi and the silver screen is delighted to feature the work of iconic MotoGP writer Mat Oxley. Oxley is a former racer, TT winner and highly respected author of biographies of world champions Mick Doohan and Valentino Rossi, and currently writes for Motor Sport Magazine, where he is MotoGP correspondent. We are featuring sections from Oxley's blogs, which are posted in full on the Motor Sport Magazine website.

Rossi and the silver screen

The church bells in Tavullia rang out on Sunday afternoon, as they always do when the town’s local hero wins a Grand Prix. I only know this because I watched the new MotoGP documentary Hitting the Apex last week.

The film’s advertised stars are Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo, Casey Stoner, Dani Pedrosa, Marc Márquez and Marco Simoncelli, but (in my mind at least), its greatest stars are Tavullia’s priests, Don Cesare Stefani and Don Giuseppe Signoretti.

The pair sit in their church (called, oh the irony, the Church of San Lorenzo the Martyr), remembering the last Saturday of June 2013, when they rang the bells to celebrate the Assen victory that marked Rossi’s return to the top step after two miserable seasons that were surely the beginning of his inevitable decline into retirement.

Scott Jones Shoots Silverstone - Rainy Race Day

In the wet, there was only ever going to be one winner from this battle

Clear visors make watching motorcycle racing in the rain even more interesting

Smoke, steam, or spray? You choose