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Circuit News: Spa Looking To Host MotoGP, MSV Acquires Donington Lease

After last week's announcements from the Circuit of Wales and the Hungaroring, there comes news from two more circuits this week. Firstly, that the legendary Belgian Spa Francorchamps circuit is looking to host a MotoGP round. And secondly, that MSV has taken over the lease to run the Donington Park circuit, also possibly opening the door to a return for MotoGP.

The first news is perhaps the most exciting for MotoGP fans. In an interview with the Belgian newspaper La Dernière Heure, Spa Francorchamps boss Nathalie Maillet, said she hoped to bring MotoGP back to the iconic Belgian circuit within the next few years. She had spent a day in Madrid speaking to Dorna bosses, Maillet told DH, discussing the possibility of staging a race. "Making the changes needed to host a motorcycle race is not impossible," Maillet told DH.

Rating The Riders, 2016: Cal Crutchlow

The next rider to go under the microscope in our retrospective of 2016 is one of the most interesting of the year. Cal Crutchlow had a season of two halves, but up and down. Here's how we rate the LCR Honda rider's performance last year:

Cal Crutchlow – Honda – 8.5
7th - 141 points

By the time Cal Crutchlow left Le Mans, after the fifth race of the 2016 MotoGP season, his future in MotoGP was being openly questioned. He had just five points from five races, and was twentieth in the championship. He had crashed out of three races, and crashed and remounted in a fourth, in Austin. Things were looking rather bleak.

His results were in stark contrast to the talk of him possibly taking the place of Dani Pedrosa in the Repsol Honda team. Fans responded to such rumors – like Pedrosa's switch to Yamaha – with a great deal of skepticism. Why would HRC want to sign a man who couldn't even finish a race?

Rating The Riders, 2016: Dani Pedrosa

The next rider under the microscope in our series examining the 2016 season is Dani Pedrosa. The Repsol Honda rider had been heavily tipped before the 2016 season, but things didn't quite work out the way he had hoped. Here's our assessment of Pedrosa.

Dani Pedrosa – Honda – 7
6th - 155 points

Dani Pedrosa was everybody's dark horse for MotoGP champion before the 2016 season began. In early testing Pedrosa was often near the front, able to exploit the additional grip of the Michelins. Rear grip had always been an issue for Pedrosa. As the lightest rider on the grid, it had been almost impossible for him to generate mechanical grip in the Bridgestone rear tire. The Michelin naturally had more rear grip, offering Pedrosa a chance to exploit all of the tricks he had learned over the years to get the rear to dig in and drive.

As the start of the season neared, Pedrosa started going backwards. After finishing third fastest at Valencia and on the first day of the strange Sepang test, he was much slower in difficult conditions at Phillip Island, then again at the Qatar test. In the opening race, he finished nearly 11 seconds behind the winner, Jorge Lorenzo. Results started to improve after that, with a podium in Argentina, then crashing out of the podium fight in Austin.

Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - After 117 years: Triumph’s first GP win

Triumph has been around since 1902 but has never won a Grand Prix. That will change soon, with Triumph set to become Moto2’s sole engine supplier

MotoGP looks set to throb to the mellifluous tone of Triumph triples from 2019, when the British brand is expected to take over from Honda as Moto2 engine supplier.

This is good news. Motorcycling needs classic brands shining in MotoGP’s limelight, and there are few older marques than Triumph, which started selling motorcycles (or motor bicycles as they were called back then) 46 years before Honda, 48 years before Ducati, 50 years before Suzuki and 52 years before Yamaha.

Triumph was established in Coventry by German immigrants Maurice Schulte and Siegfried Bettmann, who later became mayor of the city, only to be stripped of his office when the First World War broke out. The company’s first motorcycle was powered by a Belgian Minerva engine, but Schulte soon designed his own three-horsepower single, which was good enough to win the brand the nickname ‘Trusty Triumph’.

Rating The Riders, 2016: Andrea Dovizioso

We continue our review of 2016 with a look at the man Ducati decided to keep. Here is how we saw Andrea Dovizioso's performance last season, and why Ducati preferred him to Andrea Iannone:

Andrea Dovizioso – Ducati – 8
5th - 171 points

The rumors that Ducati would be signing Jorge Lorenzo immediately sparked debate among fans over which Andrea the Italian factory should keep alongside the Spaniard. Early signs were that it would be Iannone who would stay. There was talk that Ducati had a contract ready for Iannone to sign at Austin. The fans were almost unanimous: keeping Iannone was the right thing to do.

2017 Racing News Round Up: Moto2, Hungaroring, Circuit of Wales, Galbusera Interview

The first week of 2017 has come and gone, and we are a week closer to the MotoGP bikes hitting the track again at Sepang for the first test of the year. Though little of consequence is happening publicly in the midst of the winter break, there are the first few signs of activity. So below is a round up of the news from last week: most of the things that matter, all in one place.

Triumph to Moto2

Triumph Set To Become Official Moto2 Engine Supplier From 2019

The future of the Moto2 class looks secure. Reports from the UK and Austria are suggesting that Triumph has finalized a deal to supply the Moto2 class when the current deal with Honda concludes at the end of 2018. From 2019, Triumph will supply a new three-cylinder engine, probably based on the new, larger sports triple they are building for release in 2017.

There had been uncertainty over the future of the Moto2 engine supplier since the beginning of this year. Honda had extended the deal to supply CBR600RR engines until the end of the 2018 season, but as the Japanese manufacturer was stopping production of its middleweight sports bike, it was clear that a replacement would have to be found. 

There had been speculation over who might take over the role of official engine supplier. It was clear that the class would remain single supplier - any move to change the current situation would have provoked a rebellion from the teams, who are enamored of the fact that Moto2 costs less to compete in than Moto3 - but the question was who would the supplier be. The candidates were Kawasaki, with the ZX-6R, MV Agusta, and Triumph. As we wrote back in September, in a piece exclusively for MotoMatters.com subscribers, Triumph were the favorites to secure the deal.

Rating The Riders, 2016: Maverick Viñales

The next rider to be put under the microscope over his 2016 performance is Maverick Viñales. Just how did the Spanish youngster fare last year?

Maverick Viñales – Suzuki – 9
4th - 202 points

It was the million dollar question before the 2016 season: just how good is Maverick Viñales? His pedigree was impeccable: wins in every year in Grand Prix, in every class he raced in. Until he got to MotoGP, that is. In his first year in MotoGP, Viñales' best result was a pair of sixth places. Was Viñales a bust, or was he restricted by the performance of the Suzuki in its first year back in the class?

Rating The Riders, 2016: Jorge Lorenzo

Next up in our review of how the MotoGP riders performed in 2016 is Jorge Lorenzo. Here is our look at how the 2015 champion did last season:

Jorge Lorenzo – Yamaha – 8
3rd - 233 points

Jorge Lorenzo is arguably the fastest rider in the world on his day. Lorenzo's throttle control, physical control of his body, sensitivity to the movement of the bike, and ability to sense and exploit edge grip is second to none. To quote Cal Crutchlow for the umpteenth time when he was riding a Tech 3 Yamaha, "the only time we reach the lean angles that Jorge achieves is just before we fall off."

Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - How MotoGP engine-braking control works

High-performance MotoGP engines create a lot of negative torque on the overrun. It is the EBC’s job to control how much gets to the rear wheel

If you’ve been into MotoGP since the early days of 990cc four-strokes you will surely remember watching in delight as a rider braked hard with the rear wheel slewing this way and that, before flopping the bike into a corner.

These were the infant days of engine-braking control (EBC), when the hardware and software weren’t clever enough to reduce negative torque on the overrun, so the engine locked the rear wheel. The riders were left to cope with the consequences as best they could.

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