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Deep Dive: Bradley Smith Explains MotoGP Electronics, Part 1

Electronics in MotoGP are an emotive subject. They are blamed for driving costs ever higher, and for taking ever more control out of the hands of the riders. It was these factors that drove Dorna to push for the introduction of spec electronics, first through the introduction of a single ECU provided by Magneti Marelli, then the adoption of a single software platform used to control that ECU.

The rise in the use of electronics and the introduction of spec software have led to some confusion among race fans. Just what the software is capable of, and how much control the riders have over the software, is unclear to MotoGP fans, and to a large section of the media.

So to help clear that up, we had the opportunity at Brno to spend twenty minutes with Monster Tech 3 Yamaha rider Bradley Smith, who walked us through the electronics systems and their use. Smith is one of the more intelligent riders on the grid, and is able to explain complex subjects in clear and simple terms. In the first of a two-part interview with the 25-year-old Englishman, Smith tells us all about the electronics on his Yamaha M1, what they do, and how he sets them up.

Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Nine MotoGP winners – will it ever happen again?

Maybe not, because this season’s thrillingly unpredictable racing has much to do with the moment of transformation in MotoGP’s technical environment

Nine different winners in one season – something that’s never happened before in a championship that started shortly after the end of the Second World War. Amazing stuff.

But do the historic successes of Cal Crutchlow, Andrea Dovizioso, Andrea Iannone, Jorge Lorenzo, Marc Marquez, Jack Miller, Dani Pedrosa, Valentino Rossi and Maverick Viñales prove that we are now in a new era of enjoyably chaotic MotoGP racing that will continue for the foreseeable future?

Jonathan Rea On His 2016 World Superbike Title

“It's going to take time to sink in,” was the immediate reaction of Jonathan Rea upon winning his second WorldSBK title. The Northern Irishman has led the standings all year but despite this it has not been an easy title victory.

Rea has faced some challenges with his Kawasaki ZX10R throughout the 13 round championship. A spate of false neutrals-including three at Donington and also one in Germany-robbed Rea of confidence and points at crucial junctures of the year. As a result the champion said that his second title means more than 12 months ago.

2016 Qatar World Superbike Notes - And So It Ends

Jonathan Rea confirmed his status as one of the all time WorldSBK riders by claiming back to back crowns on Saturday but in the final race of the season it was Chaz Davies who claimed the spoils.

For Davies was a seventh win in the final eight races of the season and sixth in a row but ultimately the Welshman came up just two points short of Tom Sykes in the fight for second in the standings.

2016 Sepang Moto2 & Moto3 Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the Moto2 & Moto3 teams after an incident-packed Malaysian Grand Prix:


Third consecutive top 10 result for Livio Loi

After another bizarre race Livio Loi recorded his third consecutive top 10 result. In the GP of Malaysia, the third of the flyaways, RW Racing GP’s Belgian crossed the line in ninth just before the Moto3 race was red flagged because of rain.

2016 Qatar WorldSBK Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the teams and series organizer after the final round of the season for the WorldSBK series:


Double Champion Rea Makes Superbike History With Kawasaki

Jonathan Rea (Kawasaki Racing Team) secured his second FIM Superbike World Championship in succession thanks to a second place finish in the opening race at Losail in Qatar. The last time this feat was achieved was 17 years ago. Tom Sykes (KRT) finished fourth in the race to remain second in the championship standings, with one race remaining tomorrow.

2016 Sepang MotoGP Sunday Round Up: Mr. Nice Guy and Mambo Number Nine

2016 has been a weird season. Eight different winners in MotoGP, in eight consecutive races. Tire issues in Argentina causing the race to be split into two parts. A mass false start in Moto2 at the first race of the year in Qatar. Torrential rain at Assen causing the race to be abandoned. Bike swap shenanigans at the Sachsenring, and wet tire degradation at Brno. With all that happening, why would anyone expect the Sepang round of MotoGP to be any less weird?

The expectation of weirdness has also meant that everyone has half expected there to be a ninth winner in MotoGP. Fans and journalists have come to accept this as the new normal, that every race throws up a new surprise. A ninth winner would fit in perfectly with the string of surprises we have seen this year. The question is, of course, who might it be?

With six of the ten factory riders on the grid already having won a race, and the Aprilia RS-GP still too far off the pace to compete for victory, it came down to two realistic candidates: Suzuki's Aleix Espargaro, and Ducati's Andrea Dovizioso. With the Ducati being the faster bike, and already having racked up a win and several podiums, Dovizioso was the betting favorite. But both were regarded as long shots.

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