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2016 Donington World Supersport FP2 Results: Gino Rea On Top

Gino Rea fended off Randy Krummenacher and Kenan Sofuoglu to head onto tomorrow's Superpole two on top. Krummenacher put in a late lap to steal second place from Sofuoglu who was quickest for most of the session until Luke Stapleford and then Rea deposed the champion. Stapleford, 2015 British Supersport champion, ended the session fourth quickest. 

Jules Cluzel ended Friday thirteenth quickest, behind Superpole one favourites Alex Baldolini and Roberto Rolfo.

Results:

Paddock Pass Podcast Episode 27 - Mugello MotoGP, and WorldSBK at Sepang and Donington

As the motorcycle racing season heats up, Neil Morrison and Steve English bring a very timely edition of the Paddock Pass Podcast. Episode 27 starts off with the inevitable long look at the rider market, after the recent rash of official announcements. Steve and Neil break down the reasons for Maverick Viñales going to Yamaha, Andrea Iannone going to Suzuki, and Dani Pedrosa staying at Honda.

2016 Donington World Superbike FP1 Results: Sykes Leads Giugliano

Tom Sykes opened his home weekend on top of the timing sheets ahead of Davide Giugliano and Jonathan Rea. There was a brief pause after wildcard Matthieu Lussiana crashed, leaving his bike on the racing line, but it was cleared quickly and qualifying resumed. 

Results:

Opinion: Can Cameron Beaubier Revive the Stature of US Racing?

When opportunity comes knocking, it is a fool who does not open the door. That is especially true when the opportunity is as unique as the chance to race at a World Championship level event. Given the chance to shine on the world stage, you have to take that shot. So when Cameron Beaubier was asked to replace the injured Sylvain Guintoli inside the Pata Yamaha team for the Donington round of World Superbikes, I cannot imagine that he hesitated for very long before jumping at the chance.

As commendable as Beaubier's choice is, it comes with some considerable risk. Not just to the reputation of Beaubier himself, but also to the standing of American motorcycle racing in the world. As arguably the best motorcycle racer in MotoAmerica, the US domestic championship, his performance will be weighed on a silver scale, and used as a yardstick for the standard of racing in the US. The hopes and dreams of many a young American racer may lie fallow if Beaubier falls short.

The Mugello Moto2 Mix Up: Who is to Blame?

The Moto2 class has not had a lot of luck with their starts in 2016. First there was Qatar, where a mass jump start saw some riders called in for a ride through, some issued with a time penalty, and few people very happy about the way it was handled. That situation was all down to a problem with some of the high-speed starting grid cameras which check for false starts.

In Mugello there was more starting grid misery. This time, though, the problem was not with jump starts, but with restarts. An interrupted race and a quick start procedure ended up causing chaos, the first running of that procedure catching a lot of teams out, which in turn caused problems for Race Direction. As is their wont, unforeseen circumstances managed to catch everyone out, causing the first quick start procedure to be abandoned, and a regular restart instituted.

Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Could 2017 be Rossi’s year?

The 2016 season has only just started, but 2017 is already looking good for VR

So silly season is over. And it’s not even June. Now that all the major title players (with one exception) have inked their contracts for next year, it seems like the right time to write a 2017 preview. In May 2016.

Next year MotoGP’s balance of power will shift more dramatically than it has done since the arrival of Marc Marquez four years ago. What this means is that 2017 could be Valentino Rossi’s best shot at the title since his 2010 effort went west at Mugello; though obviously I’m not suggesting he’s already out of the 2016 hunt.

Jorge Lorenzo’s move to Ducati is the biggest factor in the 2017 scenario. Lorenzo’s sweet, neutral riding technique goes together with the sweet, neutral handling of Yamaha’s M1 like fish goes with chips, so it’s a huge deal that the reigning champion and current championship leader won’t be riding the bike that has brought him so much success.

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