March 2018

Private Testing Completed For Honda, Aprilia, Ducati At Jerez

The importance of a private test can sometimes be measured by the lack of news emerging from the track. For the past three days, the Jerez circuit has resounded to the bellow of MotoGP and WorldSBK machines, as Honda, Ducati, Aprilia, and KTM have shared the track.

Yet other than a couple of social media posts on Twitter and Instagram, there was next to no news from the test. The only official source was a brief news item on the official website of the Jerez circuit.

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A Life Less Ordinary - Jack Miller On Moto3-MotoGP, The Necessity Of Training, And Lessons Learned

At the Qatar Grand Prix MotoMatters.com sat down with Jack Miller to talk about life lessons and how much his life has changed since claiming his first Grand Prix victory in the desert four years ago.

Jack Miller on the grid at Qatar

Jack Miller poses questions unlike any other racer in MotoGP. Over the last three years the Australian has seen every side of racing. He's gone from being the protégé of HRC fast tracked into MotoGP, to being discarded by them as quickly as he was chosen. Miller was a constant paradox for the paddock during the early steps of his MotoGP adventure.

He was Charlie Bucket handed the golden ticket to the HRC factory, but instead of it being the childhood dream it turned out to be a double-edged sword. In Wonka's World children faced morality tests, and in Miller's World he faced tests of his will. It took Miller time to learn the ways of the world in the premier class, but by the midpoint of his rookie campaign he was certainly showing his promise once again.

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Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Ducati's cornering tool: press to turn

Ducati’s fastest three MotoGP riders all use a thumb-operated rear brake, 25 years after Mick Doohan introduced the system to Grand Prix racing

Look at this photo of Jorge Lorenzo riding through a right-hander during preseason testing. He’s at the apex, or thereabouts, with his knee on the asphalt and his elbow almost kissing the kerb. He is already looking out of the corner, working hard to turn the bike as quickly as possible, so he can segue into the acceleration phase. Now look at his left thumb: he’s at pretty much full lean, but the thumb is operating the rear brake via a custom-made thumb-brake lever.

Most of us would crash if we used the rear brake in the middle of a corner, but the brake is an essential cornering tool for most top racers, who use it in many ways that everyday motorcyclists don’t.

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Consistent Tire Performance: Piero Taramasso Explains How Michelin Strives To Eliminate Inconsistency

"A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds," wrote the American poet and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson. Little minds or no, consistency is the one complaint which many riders still level at Michelin, the official tire supplier of MotoGP. When it comes to grip, feedback, and chatter, complaints are few and far between. But consistency of feel between one tire and another remains a problem, at least in the minds of the riders.

The 2018 season opener at Qatar threw up several more examples of this lack of consistency. Ahead of the weekend, Cal Crutchlow had expressed concerns about the variation between what are supposed to be identical tires. "You can show them the data, and if you have 20% throttle here, and this tire's got this much more spin than the tire that you've got 50% throttle, and that's got less spin. It doesn't work. Apparently, they've come off the same batch."

During the race, both Johann Zarco and Dani Pedrosa believed that a lack of consistency had hampered their performance. Zarco had led for the first 17 laps, before fading with what he believed was a faulty front tire. "I got the best I could, I did what I could do, I did the job, and when I have a technician from Michelin and also on my team saying that something has been wrong, it means that OK, the rider's job is done, then when you are doing this kind of sport, this can happen." The problem, the Tech3 Yamaha rider said, was that the front tire didn't want to turn. "It was sliding. Just sliding. You go into the corner and instead of turning, you go wide. Or if you want to turn you can crash. It was this kind of problem."

Dani Pedrosa had a similar issue, though his problem was with the rear of the bike. The Repsol Honda rider had a very good front tire and a lot of confidence with it, but the rear tire was simply not playing ball. "Unfortunately the rear was spinning a lot," the Spaniard said. "I couldn't really do better, I was losing a lot in corner 3 and the long left going up and some other corners in sector 4, everybody was getting by me, and it was difficult. Lucky that I had the front so I could go hard on the front to keep the pace, but, you know, unfortunately yesterday I had one not so good tire in the qualifying, and one today in the race." It definitely felt like it was the tire, Pedrosa added, and not the change in the track from previous days.

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Three Days Of Private Testing Commences At Jerez: Repsol Honda Spend First Test Day

For the next three days, the Jerez circuit will resound to the noise of MotoGP machinery, as private testing gets underway. The Repsol Honda team will be the first to take to the track on Monday, with Marc Marquez and Dani Pedrosa riding behind closed doors. On Tuesday and Wednesday, Stefan Bradl takes over the Honda testing duties, while Aprilia, Pramac Ducati, and the Ducati WorldSBK team takes to the track. 

The fact that Marquez and Pedrosa are testing is noteworthy. Repsol Honda are using the first of their five days of private testing (Yamaha and Ducati used their test days in November at Sepang and Jerez respectively, Aprilia, Suzuki, and KTM have unlimited testing as concession teams). With HRC having been completely focused on getting the engine right during preseason testing, they have done little work on the chassis. Now that the season is underway and the engine design is frozen for 2018, Marquez and Pedrosa will turn their attentions to improving the chassis and suspension.

Marquez and Pedrosa will use just one of their five days for testing, before handing the bikes to Stefan Bradl, now test rider for HRC.

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2018 Chang Thailand World Superbike Race Two Results: Of Seat Pads And Rear Ends

Twenty laps at high speed through an oppressive Thai heat, World Superbike's second race of the weekend would use the reverse grid set by the results of the first race at the Chang International Circuit, Buriram. 

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