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2006 Le Mans Qualifying Practice - Return of the Young Challenger

The rain clouds which had caused problems during this morning's free practice session had disappeared by this afternoon, allowing the track to dry out and warm up a little. The strong winds, which had earlier blown a temporary commentary unit over, complete with worried journalists, remained, however. With everyone worried about the possibility of the rain returning later in the session, all 19 riders took off as soon as the green flag dropped, reasoning that a half-decent time might turn into a pole if the track got wet. After the first ten minutes, John Hopkins topped the timesheets with a respectable 1:36.22, with Sete Gibernau in second. The Yamahas and Kawasakis were prominent in the times, including Frenchman Randy de Puniet. De Puniet has plenty to live up to, having scored podiums at Le Mans for the last four races in a row, albeit in the 250 class. Aboard the Kawaski, in his first season of MotoGP, he faces a much tougher task this year.

But he wasn't showing much sign of that pressure, as he set the fastest time so far with 43 minutes of the session to go. His top time wasn't to last long, though, as most of the riders were out on the track, and putting in the next set of fast times. Valentino Rossi was the first rider to take de Puniet's lead from him, followed quickly by Loris Capirossi on the Ducati, whose time of 1:35.257 was getting closer to the times set during yesterday's free practice sessions. Capirossi's time also wasn't to last, though with first Colin Edwards, and then team mate Rossi, taking back fastest time for Yamaha. The Doctor's time was faster than Friday's free practice sessions, just a few hundredths over 1:35.

With 35 minutes to go, the session had gone quiet, most of the riders in the pits examining the setup to use for their fast laps later. Few riders were out improving their times, though first Gibernau and then Nakano moved up to fourth place. Most worrying for HRC was that neither Nicky Hayden, who is suffering with some kind of flu, nor Dani Pedrosa, had set a decent time, both riders a long way down on the time sheets. This was not a situation which could be allowed to stand. But it would take a while.

With 20 minutes left in the session, the pace started hotting up, and the grid was starting to look more and more interesting. Shinya Nakano was the first rider to break the 1:35 barrier, setting a 1:34.954, and the Bridgestone riders were looking more and more dominant. With 14 minutes to go, Capirossi jumped to second spot, and two minutes later, Hopkins took over first place with a 1:34.795. Nakano was not going to take this lying down, however, and retook first place within a couple of minutes. The prospect of an all Bridgestone front row, with no Hondas or Yamahas, seemed ever more likely.

The last ten minutes of qualifying practice turned intense, as they always are. Nakano's pole time, while constantly under threat, seemed safe for the moment. The Honda riders started to get into shape, with Marco Melandri moving into fifth with 8 minutes to go, only to have Dani Pedrosa shoot past him into third place a minute later, Hayden climbing to fourth another minute later. The Yamaha riders, who had been at the top of the timesheets for most of the session, were starting a downwards slide. With four minutes to go, Nakano proved that he, at least, was capable of improving his own pole time, taking nearly half a second off to 1:34.201.

With three minutes to go, everyone was out on the track. The electronic timesheet was flurry of blue, almost everyone on a personal fastest time, but no one could maintain the red numbers, indicating fastest overall. Capirossi tried, but stranded in 3rd, then Melandri tried, but only managed second. The one man constantly keeping red times after his name, was Dani Pedrosa on the Repsol Honda. After failing on his first attempt at taking pole, when he was baulked by Carlos Checa on the Tech 3 Yamaha, who was also on a fast lap, he wasn't to be thwarted next time around. With an astonishing 1:33.990, the tiny Spaniard took his second pole in succession, in only his first season in the premier division.

No one else could match either Pedrosa's fantastic time, or Nakano's similarly impressive performance. John Hopkins put in a final fast lap on his Suzuki to take the last spot on the front row, and Randy de Puniet delighted his home crowd by taking his Kawasaki to fourth. Marco Melandri will be next to de Puniet tomorrow, with Loris Capirossi being the first Ducati and last bike on the second row of the grid. Bridgestone certainly seem to have good tires for this track, one of the tracks they use for testing, as four of the top six riders are on Bridgestones. Valentino Rossi slips to seventh place on the M1 with the new chassis, team mate Colin Edwards on the old bike in 9th, and Sete Gibernau on the other Ducati sandwiched between them.

Although Nicky Hayden is only tenth on the grid, the Kentucky Kid surely won't be too disappointed, as the difference between fourth and tenth is less than 2/10ths of a second. Casey Stoner is likely to be disappointed with his eleventh place, after topping the timesheet this morning. Hopper's Suzuki team mate Chris Vermeulen earned a respectable 12th place on the grid, not bad considering this is his first race at Le Mans. Behind Vermeulen, Makoto Tamada must have expected to do better than 13th, after being much further forward yesterday. Carlos Checa put up a good fight on the disappointing Dunlops, finishing in 14th, with Kenny Roberts Junior a lot further down the timesheets than expected, in 15th place. Toni Elias is perhaps the biggest loser in qualifying, a lowly 16th well below what he is capable of. Ellison, Hofmann and Cardoso once again bring up the rear.

So, the results of yesterday's practice are turned upside down. Pedrosa put in a fantastic performance to take pole, where he was struggling yesterday, and the Yamahas, so dominant the day before, slipped some today. Bridgestone is really challenging Michelin's dominance at Le Mans, ironically a French track, despite the testing which former Dutch GP rider Jurgen van den Goorbergh has been doing on Rossi's Michelin-shod Yamaha at Mugello. With the weather uncertain for tomorrow, we are sure of a spectacle, come rain or shine.

Official results at MotoGP.com

 

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2006 Le Mans Day 2 Free Practice Session 3

As expected, the last free practice session before this afternoon's official qualifying practice was dogged by rain and difficult conditions. With the rain expected to continue this afternoon, the result looks interesting. Accomplished rain riders had a mixed morning, some doing well, others doing surprisingly dismally. Kenny Roberts Junior, after starting the session slowly, shot to the top of the standings with 10 minutes to go, putting in a series of consistently fast laps, over a second ahead of the rest, only to have his time beaten by a great lap by Casey Stoner aboard the LCR Honda. In third place is Kawasaki's Shinya Nakano, another rider who was at the front for much of the session.

Where yesterday the Yamaha's dominated, today they were much less in evidence, Valentino Rossi only entering the top three with less than five minutes to go, finally pushed into fourth by Stoner's fast lap. And where yesterday the Fortuna Hondas were languishing in the lower ranks of the field, this morning they finished in fifth and sixth, Spaniard Toni Elias ahead of his team mate Marco Melandri. Behind them, Ducati's Loris Capirossi and Suzuki's John Hopkins sit within 5/100ths of each other, after both being nearer the top of the lap times earlier in the session. Cold-stricken Nicky Hayden on the Repsol Honda is in ninth spot, followed by an improving Chris Vermeulen on the other Suzuki. Hayden's team mate Dani Pedrosa, who won here last year in the 250 race, but doesn't like the rain, follows in 11th. Local boy Randy de Puniet, the man beaten by Pedrosa last year, has so far failed to take advantage of local knowledge, ending the session behind his former 250 rival. Spanish rider Carlos Checa, on the Tech 3 Yamaha, finished a commendable 13th, and looks like being the only Dunlop rider capable of challenging. A big surprise to see one of the best rain riders in the world, Ducati's Sete Gibernau, way down in 14th, followed by Makoto Tamada on the Konica Minolta Honda. We can only assume that Sete is keeping his powder dry for this afternoon. Behind Tamada is Texas Tornado Colin Edwards in 16th, a long way down from his first and second spots yesterday. Ellison, Hofmann and Cardoso complete the sheet, with Cardoso being over 11 seconds slower than Stoner.

All in all, a little of what we expected to see, with a few surprises thrown in just to keep things interesting. Qualifying this afternoon should be a fascinating spectacle.

Official results from MotoGP.com

 

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New DVD About The 2005 US GP at Laguna Seca

I'm sure many of you will have seen the fantastic film Faster, the story of the last year of the 500 cc two-strokes, and the first year of the MotoGP bikes. It's a sumptuously filmed and directed documentary, the restrained style of the commentary beautifully juxtaposing the white-knuckle action of onboard and trackside footage. For those of you who haven't seen it, you really are missing one of the best sports documentaries ever made.

Now the director of that great movie has made another film about MotoGP:
The Doctor, The Tornado And The Kentucky Kid
This film is about the 2005 US MotoGP round at Laguna Seca, a fantastic race won in a superb showing by Nicky Hayden, the race which turned Nicky, who had been struggling to be consistent until then, into a contender. Laguna is a fantastic track, with one of the most demanding and frightening sections in the world, as the riders crest a blind left-hander, travelling fast, before swooping down into the sweeping Corkscrew, heeled hard over with the suspension gone light from the crest, riding a fine line between glory and disaster. If Faster is anything to go by, this can only be a great movie. Check it out.

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2006 Le Mans Day 1 Free Practice Session 2

Either Yamaha have found a solution to their problems, or the cold weather is reducing grip enough for the Yamaha not to suffer its usual chatter. This afternoon's session was another Yamaha 1-2, this time with Texan Tornado Colin Edwards taking top spot after leading throughout the session, followed closely by team mate Valentino Rossi. 2/10ths behind Rossi we have Nakano on the Kawasaki and Hopkins on the Rizla Suzuki. Le Mans is the Kawasaki's home test track, so it's no real surprise to see Harald Eckl's Green Machine doing well here. Hopkins is obviously on a roll, from his excellent fourth place in Shanghai.

Young Australian Casey Stoner is the first Honda on the sheet, an unleashed Makoto Tamada not far behind. Interesting that two client RC211Vs should be the top Hondas. Three thousandths behind Tamada, in seventh spot, is Sete Gibernau, in a Ducati 1-2 with team mate Loris Capirossi. Pedrosa, Melandri and Hayden follow on the HRC supported Hondas, followed by Randy de Puniet on the other Kawasaki. Kenny Roberts Junior is down in 15th, with Chris Vermeulen behind him on the second Suzuki. Vermeulen is at another new track this weekend, and it will be interesting to see how fast he learns, having shaved over a second off his time from this morning's session.

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2006 Le Mans Free Practice Day 1

In my race preview, I ventured that poor weather would favor rain riders, the Yamahas and the Suzukis. I was part right, as today's first Free Practice session, held in cold and cloudy conditions, were dominated by the Yamahas, Valentino Rossi being over a second quicker than everyone else for most of the session. With Edwards second fastest, it's still unclear whether these fast times are down to the new Yamaha M1 chassis, or the reduced grip induced by the cool conditions.

The two Yamahas were followed by Loris Capirossi on the Ducati, John Hopkins on the Suzuki, Casey Stoner on the LCR Honda, and Kawasaki's Shinya Nakano. Sete Gibernau was next, with Tamada, Hayden and Pedrosa all within a couple of tenths of each other, followed by local boy Randy de Puniet on the Kawasaki, and Kenny Roberts Jr on his new Team KR. The Fortuna Honda riders are way down, Melandri in 13th, Elias in 15th, with Checa sandwiched between them in a good showing.

We will see if this afternoon brings better weather and a different outcome.

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Rossi Gets New Chassis For Le Mans

After struggling to cure the chronic chatter problems which have plagued the 2006 Yamaha M1, it looks like the engineers have finally admitted defeat. Valentino Rossi will be riding a bike fitted with a new chassis, based on the chassis of his championship winning 2005 Yamaha. It's a big gamble to take, as Rossi's pit crew, led by Jeremy Burgess, will have to work flat out to find a setup which works with the new frame, but with The Doctor trailing by 32 points in the championship, they cannot afford to lose any more points, especially after chatter helped to destroy his front Michelin in Shanghai.

The full story can be found on Crash.net

 

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2006 Shanghai Free Practice - Day 1

Well, as expected, it rained all day Friday, providing another day of wet practice. And as expected, Bridgestone showed it has good rain tyres. What was less expected was that Yamaha seems to have found some kind of a solution to their problems this year, with Valentino Rossi topping both qualifying sessions.

Results Free Practice 1:

 

 1. Valentino Rossi ITA Camel Yamaha Team 2min 12.060 secs
2. Casey Stoner AUS Honda LCR 2min 12.062 secs
3. Kenny Roberts USA Team Roberts 2min 12.112 secs
4. Loris Capirossi ITA Ducati Marlboro Team 2min 13.034 secs
5. Sete Gibernau SPA Ducati Marlboro Team 2min 13.221 secs
6. Nicky Hayden USA Repsol Honda Team 2min 13.445 secs
7. Randy de Puniet FRA Kawasaki Racing Team 2min 13.770 secs
8. Marco Melandri ITA Fortuna Honda 2min 14.238 secs
9. Chris Vermulen AUS Rizla Suzuki MotoGP 2min 15.006 secs
10. Colin Edwards USA Camel Yamaha Team 2min 15.196 secs
11. Toni Elias SPA Fortuna Honda 2min 15.264 secs
12. John Hopkins USA Rizla Suzuki MotoGP 2min 15.316 secs
13. Makoto Tamada JPN Konica Minolta Honda 2min 15.348 secs
14. Shinya Nakano JPN Kawasaki Racing Team 2min 15.363 secs
15. Dani Pedrosa SPA Repsol Honda Team 2min 15.399 secs
16. Alex Hofmann GER Pramac d'Antin MotoGP 2min 19.398 secs
17. Carlos Checa SPA Tech 3 Yamaha 2min 19.539 secs
18. James Ellison GBR Tech 3 Yamaha 2min 22.140 secs
19. Jose Luis Cardoso SPA Pramac d'Antin MotoGP 2min 22.236 secs

Results Free Practice 1:

 

  1. Valentino Rossi ITA Camel Yamaha Team 2min 9.393 secs
2. Loris Capirossi ITA Ducati Marlboro Team 2min 9.748 secs
3. John Hopkins USA Rizla Suzuki MotoGP 2min 10.007 secs
4. Sete Gibernau SPA Ducati Marlboro Team 2min 10.187 secs
5. Nicky Hayden USA Repsol Honda Team 2min 10.247 secs
6. Marco Melandri ITA Fortuna Honda 2min 10.411 secs
7. Dani Pedrosa SPA Repsol Honda Team 2min 10.815 secs
8. Casey Stoner AUS Honda LCR 2min 11.016 secs
9. Makoto Tamada JPN Konica Minolta Honda 2min 11.313 secs
10. Randy de Puniet FRA Kawasaki Racing Team 2min 11.425 secs
11. Chris Vermulen AUS Rizla Suzuki MotoGP 2min 11.438 secs
12. Kenny Roberts USA Team Roberts 2min 11.615 secs
13. Colin Edwards USA Camel Yamaha Team 2min 11.838 secs
14. Shinya Nakano JPN Kawasaki Racing Team 2min 12.496 secs
15. Toni Elias SPA Fortuna Honda 2min 12.807 secs
16. Carlos Checa SPA Tech 3 Yamaha 2min 14.914 secs
17. James Ellison GBR Tech 3 Yamaha 2min 15.880 secs
18. Alex Hofmann GER Pramac d'Antin MotoGP 2min 15.897 secs
19. Jose Luis Cardoso SPA Pramac d'Antin MotoGP 2min 19.416 secs

 

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2006 Istanbul Race - Plus ca Change

Last year, the Istanbul Park Circuit provided a thrilling spectacle, as Rossi and Melandri slugged it out at the front of the field. In just its second year, the track laid claim to a place in motorcycling history, providing some of the closest and most exciting racing imaginable. After an astonishing 250 race, in which any one of four riders could have won, the MotoGP race turned into one of the best races that MotoGP has seen for a very long time. The track challenges bike and rider, rewards risk, and offers plenty of places to attack the opposition. The fast Turn 11, before the heavy braking for the Turn 12 - 13 - 14 combination, nicknamed the "Tilke Twiddles" after the track designer, the last turns before the finish line, means that if you can stay within spitting distance on the last lap, you are in with a chance of the win.

With the track dry, and no sign of rain, everyone expected the Suzukis to get swamped quickly, and start dropping off the back from the get-go. Vermeulen's fantastic display in qualifying, taking pole, together with Hopkins in a season's best 5th spot certainly made up for the dismal showing at Qatar, but without rain, they weren't expected to use the advantage the Bridgestone rain tires so obviously afforded during qualifying. As it happened, tires were indeed to play a crucial role, but manufacturers than the seasoned heads were saying.

As the red lights extinguished, the Suzukis surprised everyone, with Vermeulen getting a fantastic start from pole to lead the race, with Gibernau hot on his heels, and Hopkins improving on his grid position to take third spot, followed by Hayden, Stoner and Melandri. Gibernau sneaked past Vermeulen round the back of the circuit, but Vermeulen took Gibernau back in a spectacular braking maneuver into Turn 12, the first of many such moves we would see today. But Vermeulen couldn't hold on to the lead. On the next lap, first Gibernau and then a fired-up Hopkins went past Vermeulen, pushing him back into third.

Further down the field, Valentino Rossi had started to improve upon his poor grid position, moving up into 9th, behind team mate Colin Edwards, and pushing on to try to regain a grip on the championship. But he pushed too hard, running wide and off the track, dropping to 14th before rejoining the race. At least this time, his bike wasn't damaged as it was at Jerez, but he still had a lot of catching up to do.

Up at the front, a battle royal was developing. Gibernau managed to grab a small lead, fluctuating between 0.5 and 1 second, while behind him, Hopkins, Stoner, Hayden, Melandri, and Vermeulen duked it out, constantly swapping positions, with Vermeulen slowly dropping off the back of the group. On one lap, Hayden would pass Melandri going into the downhill drop of Turn 2, but be back behind Melandri on the brakes going into Turn 12.

Behind this group sat Capirossi, with Edwards slowly closing him down, and a hard charging Dani Pedrosa moving very quickly through the field from his dire 16th spot on the starting grid on the factory Honda, with Rossi desparately trying to recover lost ground from his runoff.

Then, from lap 7, the lack of practise on a dry track started taking its toll. Hopkins, who had made a strong impression, running in second place up till then, first let Stoner past, then, on the next lap, lost nearly a second as his tires started to go off, from running too soft a tire. By the end of lap 9, he had slipped from 2nd to 9th. And Hopkins wasn't the only Bridgestone rider to be struggling. Gibernau, who had led since lap 2, lapped half a second slower on lap 9 and 10, losing entirely the margin he'd acquired on the following group. By 11, the Ducati rider had slipped from 1st to 5th.

This left the front group, which by then had been caught by Pedrosa, to slug it out for the lead. The Hondas of Melandri, Pedrosa, Hayden and Stoner were all evenly matched, and the positions they held depended on who got through Turn 1 fastest, and who could brake into Turn 12 hardest. As Gibernau slipped down the order, he held up Vermeulen just long enough for the Suzuki rider to lose touch with the leading group. Still, the Australian Suzuki rider was faring better than his team mate Hopkins, who by this time had been forced to pit for a new rear tire.

Capirossi must have chosen a different tyre to Gibernau, as the other Ducati rider managed to maintain his position a couple of seconds off the leading group, but could not close them down. Valentino Rossi, meanwhile, was having fewer problems gaining on the leaders, trailing Melandri's Honda team mate Toni Elias in his wake. By lap 13, both Rossi and Elias were past Colin Edwards, and within 6 seconds of the leader Dani Pedrosa. Behind Edwards came the two Kawasakis of Nakano and de Puniet, the Frenchman not being able to capitalize on his excellent grid position. An improved Makoto Tamada followed close behind the Kawasakis, leaving a gap of over 10 seconds to a steady Kenny Roberts Jr. Kenny Jr rode an incredibly consistent race, lapping constantly in the low 1:56s and high 1:55s. Unfortunately, the leaders were riding 1:54s. And to demonstrate that it wasn't just the Bridgestone riders who were having tire problems, British rider James Ellison was also in the pits collecting a new rear Dunlop for his Tech 3 Yamaha.

Working in Rossi's favour was the continuing battle up front. For the next 5 laps, Nicky Hayden, Dani Pedrosa, Marco Melandri and Casey Stoner were engaged in an epic battle for the lead. Although Pedrosa led for much of this time, he could never get away, as each time he managed to get a small gap, he would be chased down by Hayden, and lose time having to block his HRC team mate, giving Melandri and Stoner a chance to catch back up, and get in each other's way as they swapped places out of Turn 11 and into Turn 12. But by lap 18, this epic struggle was taking its toll on Hayden's tire, as he started to lose touch after running wide as he was passed by Melandri.

And then there were three. After passing Hayden, Melandri got a great run out of the blazingly fast Turn 11, allowing him to out-brake Pedrosa into the Turn 12 to 14 Tilke Twiddles. This move also allowed Stoner to close up on Pedrosa, and pass him on the finish straight at the start of lap 18. By the end of the lap, the young Australian had passed Melandri as well to take the lead.

For the next 3 laps, it looked as if Stoner was going to equal Freddie Spencer's record as the youngest GP winner ever, being exactly the same age, to the day, as Spencer was when he won in Spa Francorchamps in 1983. Stoner on the LCR Honda had gained a little gap on Melandri and Pedrosa bogged themselves down in the scrap for second place. But this dispute was settled over the course of the penultimate lap. Pedrosa attempted to force his Repsol HRC Honda in front of Melandri going into Turn 12, but almost out-braked himself, running wide and letting Melandri get a gap. In a last ditch attempt to catch the Italian, Pedrosa flung his Honda into the downhill Turn 1, losing the front end and sliding off into the gravel.

This freed Melandri to concentrate on catching Stoner over less than the lap that was left. He looked like he wasn't close enough into Turn 9 and 10, and hadn't gained significantly through Turn 11, but in a masterful display of gutsy braking, he nudged his Honda ahead of Stoner's braking into Turn 12, while keeping the door firmly closed through the "Tilke Twiddles", and taking a hard-fought but richly deserved win. Stoner took second just a fraction behind, while Hayden hung on to his sliding bike to clinch a crucial third place, making it an impressive three podiums in a row for the Kentucky Kid.

He was lucky the race wasn't one lap longer though, as Rossi had closed to fourth, just 8/10ths behind Hayden, and lapping a lot faster, with Toni Elias in his wake. Ten seconds adrift, Vermeulen was unlucky to have sixth taken from him by Capirossi on the last lap, marking an impressive race by the other Australian rookie. Five seconds behind Vermeulen, Nakano had passed Colin Edwards to take 8th, the Texan not being able to make much headway so far this season. Tamada followed Edwards at a distance, the Japanese Honda rider's tenth place surely coming as a relief after his previous disastrous outing at Qatar.

Behind Tamada came another rider whom Lady Luck does not appear to favor. One-time race leader Sete Gibernau had slipped to a lowly 11th spot, nursing his tires 30 seconds behind the winner. The other Kawasaki rider Randy de Puniet led home Kenny Roberts Jr on the Honda V5-powered Team KR machine. Although 13th will not be what Kenny Jr would have hoped for, it's a long way ahead of where Kenny Sr's bikes were finishing last year.

Dani Pedrosa had bravely remounted to finish the race, grabbing two points which may turn out to be crucial by the end of the season. Spanish Yamaha rider Carlos Checa took the last point, with the Dunlop-shod Ducati of Alex Hoffman finishing ahead of John Hopkins, after Hopper returned to the pits for a new rear tire. James Ellison, the other rider to pit for tires, was the last official finisher.

Melandri's victory means that we have only ever had one winner at Istanbul. To be fair, that's in only two races, but the Italian has shown that the track really suits him. Stoner made clear that he is destined to win a race sometime very soon indeed, and it can't be long before Dani Pedrosa decides he wants the big cup too.

Nicky Hayden was careful not to try to apportion blame after the race, even though it was obvious deteriorating tires had robbed him of the chance to go for broke on the last lap. But you can't keep finishing on the podium without getting on that top step at some point, and the way that Nicky is riding, it looks like being sooner rather than later.

Valentino Rossi rode another outstanding race, after almost putting himself out of contention. No one can doubt the champion's determination and skill after his display, but if he had managed to get a decent spot on the grid in qualifying, there would have been no need to push so hard that he ran off track during the race.

This leaves the title race wide open, with three race winners so far, and the top five riders separated by 12 points. There is everything to play for, and the riders know it.

Istanbul Race Results

 

Marco Melandri

ITA

Fortuna Honda

41min 54.065 secs

Casey Stoner

AUS

Honda LCR

41min 54.265 secs

Nicky Hayden

USA

Repsol Honda Team

41min 59.523 secs

Valentino Rossi

ITA

Camel Yamaha Team

42min 0.274 secs

Toni Elias

SPA

Fortuna Honda

42min 0.652 secs

Loris Capirossi

ITA

Ducati Marlboro Team

42min 10.747 secs

Chris Vermulen

AUS

Rizla Suzuki MotoGP

42min 10.842 secs

Shinya Nakano

JPN

Kawasaki Racing Team

42min 15.602 secs

Colin Edwards

USA

Camel Yamaha Team

42min 16.912 secs

Makoto Tamada

JPN

Konica Minolta Honda

42min 24.548 secs

Sete Gibernau

SPA

Ducati Marlboro Team

42min 24.608 secs

Randy de Puniet

FRA

Kawasaki Racing Team

42min 28.349 secs

Kenny Roberts

USA

Team Roberts

42min 39.177 secs

Dani Pedrosa

SPA

Repsol Honda Team

42min 47.590 secs

Carlos Checa

SPA

Tech 3 Yamaha

42min 53.920 secs

Alex Hofmann

GER

Pramac d'Antin MotoGP

42min 55.306 secs

John Hopkins

USA

Rizla Suzuki MotoGP

43min 32.693 secs

James Ellison

GBR

Tech 3 Yamaha

43min 27.080 secs

DNF:
Jose Luis Cardoso SPA Pramac d'Antin MotoGP 42min 25.898 secs

Championship Standings

 

1

Nicky HAYDEN

USA

52

2

Loris CAPIROSSI

ITA

51

3

Marco MELANDRI

ITA

45

4

Casey STONER

AUS

41

5

Valentino ROSSI

ITA

40

6

Dani PEDROSA

SPA

32

7

Toni ELIAS

SPA

32

8

Shinya NAKANO

JPN

22

9

Colin EDWARDS

USA

19

10

Sete GIBERNAU

SPA

18

11

Kenny ROBERTS JR

USA

17

12

Makoto TAMADA

JPN

14

13

Chris VERMEULEN

AUS

13

14

Carlos CHECA

SPA

8

15

John HOPKINS

USA

7

16

Randy DE PUNIET

FRA

4

17

James ELLISON

GBR

3

18

Alex HOFMANN

GER

2

 

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2006 Istanbul Warmup

The grid was out in force this morning, to get some track time on a drying track. The damp spots which were still present early in the session had dried up by the end, and times dropped fairly dramatically. Interestingly, even though the track was dry, the top of the timesheet is still heavily populated with Bridgestone riders. Both the Ducatis looked very fast, with Gibernau looking very impressive. Vermeulen, who dominated yesterday's qualifying, was anonymous today, finishing 16th behind James Ellison; fortunately for Suzuki team mate Hopkins took over the reins, leading the times for much of the session, to finish 4th. The only Michelin rider in the top 3 was Stoner, who was good yesterday and looks good today.

Yesterday's losers made good a lot of the ground they had given up, with Pedrosa 5th, Melandri 6th, and Rossi 7th. Edwards is said to be suffering from a painful shoulder after a fall yesterday morning, but still managed a respectable 11th. Two minor surprises are Kenny Roberts Jr, who seems to be consolidating his grip on 9th, and Makoto Tamada's fine 8th. Whether Tamada can maintain this form into the race remains to be seen. Of the Kawasaki riders, Randy de Puniet put in another good performance, to finish 10th, but team mate Nakano was a little off the pace in 14th.

Another big winner yesterday was way down the sheets today: Nicky Hayden didn't look convincing all session, and finished in lowly 13th spot, behind Elias.

With the skies looking overcast, and spots of rains appearing sporadically on camera lenses, this afternoon's race looks like being a gamble. There is a very strong possibility that we could see the first spectacle of riders coming in to change bikes, under the red and white flag rule. The riders will be in a quandary as to which bike to start on, the wet or the dry. We shall see.

Times (Source, motogp.com)

 

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2006 Istanbul Qualifying - Rain Dance

Rain changes everything in motorcycle racing. It changes small things, such as the color of a rider's visor, with most of them switching to clear visors. This offers the television viewer the fantastic spectacle of watching the rider's face and eyes, seeing where they are looking, and what they are thinking. Rain changes bigger things, like the dominant tyre manufacturer. All of a sudden, of the top 8 riders, 6 are on Bridgestones. And it changes the most important thing: the relationship of the rider to their bike. Middle order racers no longer believe that they don't stand a chance, because of the 10 or 20 horsepower they know they are short of, so they start to ride the bike they were cursing (or worse) at the last race like it was a championship bike. And champions start riding like tail-enders, because they can't find the confidence which they had in their machine just a few weeks previously, or because the rain has turned their natural advantage into a disadvantage. Rain unmarks the cards and redeals the hands.

And this afternoon, rain brought us the spectacle of a class rookie once again dominating qualifying. It was a different rookie, and it was only the one session, unlike Qatar, where Stoner dominated all four sessions, but it was a heartening spectacle to see Vermeulen ride the wheels off the Suzuki, backing it in to corners and sliding the front all session long, as if it was the last race of the season, and he had a title to clinch. And he really did dominate from the start: except for a period of 8 minutes mid-session, and 15 or so seconds when he was on the same lap as Hayden or Capirossi, Vermeulen was top of the charts throughout, often with leads of well over a second.

But Vermeulen wasn't the only rider to push so hard: Nicky Hayden came within 5 yards of taking the pole. That's the distance he left braking too late into what Michael Scott has called the "Tilke Twiddles", the tight left-right-left turns 12, 13 and 14, after the fastest section of the track, and before the main straight. Carrying too much speed, with a miniscule time advantage over Vermeulen, he couldn't control a stuttering rear end to get into turn 12 cleanly, and overshot, returning to the track visibly upset with himself, for what he later called "a club racer's mistake". Hayden was strong all session, one of the few riders not to brake into the very high-speed right-hander of turn 11.

That's where the difference was most visible: the riders most comfortable with their set-up were backing off a little before the turn, not quite keeping it pinned like they would when it's dry, but the strugglers were sitting up and braking, losing maybe 10 or 15 mph on the fast guys. The sweeping sections of turns 2 through 4 were another place where the difference between those who were pushing and those who were hanging on for grim death were plain for all to see.

The top of the grid shows a pleasing mix of classic rain riders (Gibernau), surprising (Vermeulen, de Puniet) and unsurprising (Stoner) rookies, and the usual fast suspects (Capirossi and Hayden). The Ducatis were obviously sorted from the start, with Capirossi constantly challenging for top spot, and Gibernau pleased to get a spot on the front row, though hoping that it doesn't end in the electrical tears it did in Jerez. Suzuki must be delighted, after the trauma of Qatar, where they suffered six destroyed engines in six sessions. With Vermeulen on pole, and Hopkins behind him in fifth, they can feel they have made a fresh start, with only the engine problem of the second Free Practice session as the spectre at the feast reminding them of what may happen. Hopkins looked comfortable, putting in a long 9 lap run at the start before stepping up the pace in his second and third runs.

The real disappointment will be for the two champions of the series. Valentino Rossi never looked at ease with the Yamaha in the rain, while Dani Pedrosa's performance was almost painful to watch. Weighing 51 kilos, or 105 pounds, gives you a huge advantage when it's dry: you can brake later, and you accelerate faster, as the bike has less to carry. But when it's wet, it works against you: you have less weight to control the bike, and more importantly, the back wheel. Pedrosa fought and cursed his way through the session, his back wheel stepping out almost every time he exited turn 14 onto the start and finish straight, and at just about every other corner of the track. His dislike of riding in the rain can only have been magnified by the problems caused by twice the horsepower he had in the 250s. Rossi, after having sorted the chatter the Yamahas suffered at Jerez, only to struggle with a lack of grip here at Istanbul, is facing the toughest defence of his title so far. With Capirossi and Hayden at the front of the grid, and Rossi down in 11th, the chances of Valentino gaining some more ground on the leaders look very slight. We might just have a championship which is settled in the last race of the year, rather than by halfway.

Though the contrast between Pedrosa in 16th and Hayden in 2nd was not as pronounced for Rossi (11th) and Edwards (9th), Edwards certainly looked more like he was enjoying himself. Where Rossi seemed to brake uncharacteristically gingerly, Edwards was much more forceful and committed, riding the bike less like a 250, as he'd been trying to teach himself, and more like his old superbike, a habit he's been trying to get out of. It paid off, but not as much as he would have liked.

Rossi and Pedrosa were in good company. Sandwiched between the two champions were the rest of the Honda riders, including last year's winner Melandri in 14th. Yet it can't be down to the bike, as the blazing performance of Hayden, the solid showing for Stoner, and even the fine showing by Kenny Roberts JR show that the Honda (or in Kenny Jr's case, the Honda engine) does well in the right hands.

Kenny Junior won't be the only rider hoping for rain tomorrow. Half the grid, including all of the Bridgestone riders, will hope for a decent soaking tomorrow. The other half will be praying for a dry track: during practice, you can sit in your pit and ponder every few laps; in a wet race, you have no choice but to ride. The weather forecasts are as evenly divided as the riders, with half promising cloudy, but dry skies, and the other half threatening rain.

As for me, I'm on the side of the rain dancers. It will keep the excitement in the series, and maybe even throw up a new and unexpected winners. Now, I wonder what odds I'd get on de Puniet to win?

Results:

 

 1       71      Chris VERMEULEN SUZUKI          2'04.617                286.9 2       69      Nicky HAYDEN    HONDA           2'04.823        0.206   284.0 3       15      Sete GIBERNAU   DUCATI          2'05.003        0.386   284.9 4       65      Loris CAPIROSSI DUCATI          2'05.540        0.923   286.2 5       21      John HOPKINS    SUZUKI          2'05.700        1.083   288.9 6       17      Randy DE PUNIET KAWASAKI        2'06.102        1.485   285.8 7       27      Casey STONER    HONDA           2'07.277        2.660   287.0 8       56      Shinya NAKANO   KAWASAKI        2'07.294        2.677   285.5 9       5       Colin EDWARDS   YAMAHA          2'07.344        2.727   278.8 10      10      Kenny ROBERTS   KR211V          2'07.345        2.728   269.7 11      46      Valentino ROSSI YAMAHA          2'07.552        2.935   280.2 12      24      Toni ELIAS      HONDA           2'07.763        3.146   278.2 13      6       Makoto TAMADA   HONDA           2'08.143        3.526   284.1 14      33      Marco MELANDRI  HONDA           2'08.393        3.776   279.1 15      7       Carlos CHECA    YAMAHA          2'10.322        5.705   280.3 16      26      Dani PEDROSA    HONDA           2'10.956        6.339   265.0 17      66      Alex HOFMANN    DUCATI          2'11.241        6.624   269.7 18      30      J-L CARDOSO     DUCATI          2'11.456        6.839   273.5 19      77      James ELLISON   YAMAHA          2'12.298        7.681   268.0 

 

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