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All Change In WorldSBK: BMW, Honda, Yamaha Announce New Teams And New Bikes At EICMA

While the line up for the 2019 MotoGP season was settled surprisingly early in the year, the opposite has been the case for WorldSBK. With just two weeks to go to the first full test of 2019, there are still a whole range of seats open, and questions going unanswered.

One of the reasons for the delay became clear at the EICMA show in Milan last week. While the manufacturers were presenting their newest bikes, including some of the key machines which will star in World Superbikes next year, a couple of manufacturers also presented their racing programs for 2019.

Perhaps the biggest story came from Honda, where HRC presented Althea and Moriwaki as their new partners in running their WorldSBK program. After a partnership of three years, and a relationship going back nearly two decades, Ten Kate are out, with the Italians and Japanese taking over.

It wasn't just Ten Kate: title sponsor Red Bull were also out. The energy drink firm had signed up when Nicky Hayden was with the team, a big name draw for sponsors, and a rider with a long connection to Red Bull. It was Red Bull who brought in Jake Gagne, the American who never really found his feet in the WorldSBK championship. After two years of poor results, Red Bull withdrew.

HRC + WorldSBK

The idea behind the switch is to have much more direct involvement from HRC in the project. Moriwaki is to focus on developing the Honda CBR1000RR SP2, while Althea is to handle the logistics and management of the team. Japanese rider Ryuichi Kiyonari has been brought in to ease communication with Moriwaki and HRC, while Leon Camier has been retained with the objective of chasing results.

The direct involvement of HRC marks a major change of tack. The Japanese factory has been absent from WorldSBK since 2002, the year in which Colin Edwards became world champion on a Honda RC51. Since then, Ten Kate has been left to hold the fort with the aid of Honda Motor Europe, the European headquarters of the Japanese manufacturer. In the past, that support was always resented by HRC in Japan. A former Honda team member once said of the previous HRC vice president Shuhei Nakamoto, "he sees every Euro spent on World Superbikes as one which should have been spent on MotoGP," they told me.

It seems like Honda decided they could no longer stand idly by and see a Honda get beaten in a racing series. They have won just about every other major championship in recent years: Marc Márquez in MotoGP, Joan Mir and Jorge Martin in Moto3, Tim Gajser in MXGP, and Kevin Benavides was runner up in the 2018 Dakar Rally. The last time a Honda won a World Superbike title was in 2007, when James Toseland took the title for the Ten Kate team.

Necessary faster

Merely increasing the level of support may not be enough. As HRC found to their cost at Suzuka, the Honda CBR1000RR is being outperformed by its rivals, even with full factory backing. The latest iteration of the Fireblade may have had extra electronics aids to help with corner entry and throttle response, the fact is that the bike is still listed as producing 190 horsepower. That is 11hp down on the Kawasaki ZX-10RR, which produces 201hp, 14hp down on the new BMW S1000RR, which is listed at 204hp, and a whopping 27hp down on Ducati's latest weapon the Panigale V4 R. With the technical regulations restricting any major changes in pursuit of power, it is hard to see how HRC can make much of a difference.

Honda weren't the only manufacturer making a presentation at EICMA. BMW were there, announcing they are partnering with Shaun Muir's SMR Milwaukee Racing for the 2019 season. SMR is to switch from Aprilia to BMW, and compete next year on the new BMW S1000RR introduced at the EICMA show.

BMW and SMR also announced two new riders: gone are Eugene Laverty and Lorenzo Savadori, moved to make way for Tom Sykes and Markus Reiterberger. Reiterberger has a long association with the Munich factory, having bounced between the WorldSBK series, the German IDM championship, and the Superstock 1000 championship aboard a BMW, winning the Superstock title in 2018. Sykes had left Kawasaki disillusioned, feeling that Kawasaki had favored Jonathan Rea and developed the bike in his direction, rather than for Sykes. As first Kawasaki rider to win a title since Scott Russell in 1993, Sykes felt overlooked.

VVT comes to SBK

The new BMW S1000RR is an interesting prospect for the 2018 WorldSBK season. The bike has been completely redesigned, including radical change in chassis and BMW's new ShiftCam variable valve system. The frame now features much lower forward engine mounting points, allowing the use of longer forward struts. This follows contemporary thinking on managing chatter and cornering, and is a design pattern which has been used in MotoGP since the class switched to four stroke engines.

The ShiftCam technology will also be an interesting development. The system features two inlet cam lobes – a mild lift one for lower engine speeds and more torque, and a high lift one for full power – which are shifted using a selector drum. An electric motor inserts a steel pin into a slot, which physically moves the camshaft sideways along its rotating axis. Although it is a mechanical system, the timing of the shift between the milder, torquier lobes, and the sharper, higher power lobes is electronically determined based on engine speed, gear, throttle opening, etc. This will become one more variable to be managed inside the electronics, and should in theory offer an advantage in providing smoother power delivery on corner exit, as well as more predictable back torque on corner entry.

Testing season opens

We will have to wait until the end of November to find out just how much of an improvement the new BMW S1000RR is over the old bike. The WorldSBK paddock will assemble at Jerez on 26th and 27th of November, with all of the teams currently entered set to test. Ducati and Kawasaki will be getting an earlier start, with Chaz Davies getting his first taste of the Ducati Panigale V4 R alongside Jonathan Rea and Leon Haslam at Aragon on the 14th and 15th, Wednesday and Thursday of this month.

Yamaha were the last manufacturer to make an announcement at EICMA last week. As had been widely expected, the GRT Yamaha team announced they would be stepping up to the WorldSBK class in 2019 aboard Yamaha YZF-R1Ms. The rider line up was a little more of a surprise: Sandro Cortese got the call to move up, reward for lifting the 2018 WorldSSP crown. Marco Melandri, discarded by Ducati, was picked up by GRT Yamaha, in a move which had been rumored for a while.

Open seats

Those might have been the announcements which have already been made, but there are still plenty of questions still left unanswered. There are some big names left unsigned, and some manufacturers still uncertain of competing. There are perpetual rumors about Aprilia's intention for 2019, rumors which span the gamut from a complete withdrawal to fielding a factory team. There is talk of Suzuki being interested in WorldSBK, though their involvement would only extend to supplying bikes, and little else. The Suzuki GSX-R1000R produces 202hp, and has been competitive in British Superbikes.

Riders left without a seat for 2019 at the moment include Eugene Laverty, WorldSBK runner up in 2013 and multiple race winner; Xavi Fores, who had five podiums in 2018 and was often ahead of the factory-backed Aruba.it Ducatis; Loris Baz, double race winner on a Kawasaki as teammate to Tom Sykes; Lorenzo Savadori, regarded by Aprilia as the future of their program; and Jordi Torres, an immensely popular Spaniard and race winner for Aprilia.

Also out of WorldSBK is Laguna Seca. The US circuit announced their 2019 schedule last week, which included a curt statement that World Superbikes would not be part of the MotoAmerica round in July, as is tradition.

Where WorldSBK will be racing in 2019 is still not entirely finalized. A calendar is due to be released any day now, but it appears that some details may still need to be finalized. Kyalami in South Africa is set to be one of the stops on the calendar, while the German language website Speedweek is reporting that the Sokol circuit in Kazakhstan could join the calendar.

Below is the 2019 WorldSBK line up as it stands so far.

Aruba.it Ducati  
Chaz Davies Ducati Panigale V4R
Alvaro Bautista Ducati Panigale V4R
   
Pata Yamaha  
Alex Lowes Yamaha YZF-R1
Michael van der Mark Yamaha YZF-R1
   
GRT Yamaha  
Marco Melandri Yamaha YZF-R1
Sandro Cortese Yamaha YZF-R1
   
Kawasaki Racing Team  
Jonathan Rea Kawasaki ZX-10RR
Leon Haslam Kawasaki ZX-10RR
   
Barni Ducati  
Michael Ruben Rinaldi Ducati Panigale V4R
   
Moriwaki Althea Honda  
Leon Camier Honda CBR1000RR
Ryuichi Kiyonari Honda CBR1000RR
   
SMR BMW  
Tom Sykes BMW S1000RR
Markus Reiterberger BMW S1000RR
   
Puccetti Kawasaki  
Toprak Razgatlioglu Kawasaki ZX-10RR
   
Pedercini  
Gabriel Ruiu Kawasaki ZX-10RR? Aprillia RSV4?
   
GoEleven  
Roman Ramos Kawasaki ZX-10RR? Aprillia RSV4?
   
Althea Honda  
Alessandro Delbianco? Honda CBR1000RR

Gathering the background information for detailed articles such as these is an expensive and time-consuming operation. If you enjoyed this article, please consider supporting MotoMatters.com. You can help by either taking out a subscription, by making a donation, or by contributing via our GoFundMe page.

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Tom's Tech Treasures: Studying The MotoGP Bikes At Phillip Island

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


Torque sensor on the Yamaha M1
Peter Bom: Like all current MotoGP engines, the Yamaha M1 has a torque sensor fitted to the drive shaft. By measuring the amount of torque delivered on the track, the manufacturer can validate their engine dyno torque maps and fine tune them on the track. Note that Yamaha don’t use them on Sunday, that’s when everything should be sorted out. Left of the sprocket is an ‘inside-out’ or inverted sprocket which the external starter motor slides into.


Reinforced chassis on the Suzuki GSX-RR
Peter Bom: By gluing carbon fiber onto specific points, Suzuki can increase the stiffness of their chassis exactly where they want, and how much they want.


Aerodynamic outflows on the Ducati GP18 (Petrucci)


Suzuki GSX-RR engine


Honda RC213V tail (Marquez)


Carbon swingarm (Honda RC213V)


Front end of the Yamaha M1 (Valentino Rossi) with carbon fork


Electronics hub on the Yamaha M1


Ducati GP18 winglets


Electronics hub on the KTM RC16


Sensor on the clutch lever on Valentino Rossi’s M1 to evaluate starts. Maverick Viñales has a similar system


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

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Grand Prix Commission Close Down More Electronics Loopholes

The Grand Prix Commission is to tighten the noose on electronics a little further, in an attempt to prevent cheating. The GPC today issued a press release containing the minutes of their meeting held at the Malaysian Grand Prix in Sepang. There, they agreed restrictions on the ECU, agreed to limit riders in all classes to FIM homologated helmets, and increased the penalty for speeding in pit lane.

The two changes to the electronics are aimed at restricting the ability of teams to alter the data on the official ECU. The first change allows the Technical Director to use an official approved laptop to download the data directly from the datalogger on the bike, connected to the ECU, rather than relying on the team to provide the data. By downloading the data directly, the idea is to ensure that the data has not been altered for whatever reason.

The issue for the teams is that their data is then stored on a computer outside their control. To ensure that such data does not leak to their rivals, a safeguard has been put in place to have the data deleted once it has been verified by Technical Control.

The second change to the regulations involves forcing the use of an official unified CAN Bus decoupler. This is basically the adapter used to connect a laptop to the spec ECU, to allow the data engineer to download the data from the datalogger. It is called a "decoupler", because it isolated the two ends of the connection, meaning there is no direct electronic connection between the ECU and the laptop, to avoid electrical surges from causing damage. As there is already some intelligence built into the decoupler, it is conceivable that a team or factory could program the decoupler to alter the data in some way as it is being downloaded. Enforcing the use of an official item avoids this.

The other major change for next year is that only FIM homologated helmets will be allowed to be used in any FIM sanctioned racing activity, which includes MotoGP. The FIM homologation of helmets is stricter and more thorough than the current test used by national and international standards, such as ECE, Snell, and JIS. 

In general, this will have a positive effect on safety, both for racers and for consumers, as manufacturers move to incorporate the new FIM standard in the design of their helmets.

But there has been some criticism as well: the FIM homologation process features a hard-shell philosophy. The idea behind this philosophy is that injury from direct impact is best prevented by having a hard helmet shell, which resists puncture or damage as much as possible. Critics say that although this protects against direct impact, it does not absorb energy as well, increasing the risk of brain damage because the rider's head is stopped more abruptly, generating higher g forces, and allowing the rider's brain to move inside their skull.

The other school of helmet design favors a softer shell, which has more flexibility. The idea behind this is to bend slightly and absorb energy, allowing the rider's head to decelerate more slowly, and reducing the chance of brain injury as the brain moves inside the skull. The downside to this philosophy is a lower resistance to impact, the critics claim. 

Depending on which philosophy a particular helmet manufacturer follows, it will be easier or more difficult to obtain FIM homologation. Some manufacturers may be forced to produce special racing helmets to comply with the FIM requirements.

The press release from the GPC appears below, and from the FIM on helmet homologation below that:


FIM Grand Prix World Championship
Decision of the Grand Prix Commission

The Grand Prix Commission, composed of Messrs. Carmelo Ezpeleta (Dorna, Chairman), Paul Duparc (FIM), Herve Poncharal (IRTA) and Takanao Tsubouchi (MSMA), in the presence of Carlos Ezpeleta (Dorna), Mike Trimby (IRTA, Secretary of the meeting) and Corrado Cecchinelli (Director of Technology), in a meeting held in Sepang on 3 November 2018 made the following decisions:

Technical Regulations

EFFECTIVE SEASON 2019

Data Analysis – MotoGP Class
The Technical Director has been granted authority to download data directly from the ECU to the “Official PC” for the purpose of verifying that it has not been modified from its original recording. Once it is established that the data complies with the FIM regulations it will be deleted from the Official PC.

ECU and Connections – MotoGP Class
In addition to the official ECU and IMU teams are now restricted to only using the official unified CAN decoupler which may also not be modified or have additions.

The unified Can decoupler is categorised as a “Free Device”

Ambient Fuel Temperature – MotoGP Class
The lead time between the announcement of the official ambient temperature and the start of the race has been increased from 60 to 75 minutes. This is to give teams more time to complete the fuelling process.

Helmets
The Commission approved the new FIM helmet standard established by the FIM for all circuit racing disciplines. This means that there will now be a single, enhanced standard for helmets, replacing the various international standards used before (ECE, Snell and JIS).

Helmet homologation tests are ongoing with some manufacturers having already concluded the tests and some planned within the next weeks. It is the intention of the FIM to publish by the Valencia GP a list of the helmets manufacturers that have been approved through the FIM Racing Homologation Programme and of those which are working to achieve this.

Brake Components
More detailed specifications for the materials used for brake hose connections and brake master cylinders were approved.

Disciplinary Matters

EFFECTIVE SEASON 2019

Speeding in Pit Lane
Currently there is a standard fine of €200 for exceeding the pit lane speed limit.

In future the FIM MotoGP Stewards will have the possibility to impose larger financial penalties for repeat offences during the same event. The Stewards will also have the right to impose higher fines or further penalties for excessive speed or for multiple repeat offences during the season.


FIM homologated helmets mandatory in Grand Prix as of 2019

Following the decision of the last Grand Prix Commission, who gathered in Sepang (MAL) on November 3 2018, the use of FIM homologated helmets will be mandatory for all riders accessing FIM Grand Prix competitions starting from next year. The FIM homologation will be thus required for the helmets in place of the international standards (ECE, Snell and JIS) to which the FIM referred solely to until now. Relatively to the international standards previously referred to, the FIM homologated helmets have undergone an enhanced and more complete evaluation of their performance; this includes an assessment of the protection against low, medium and high velocity linear impacts, oblique impacts and penetration.

The FIM Homologation Label will uniquely identify each helmet that access FIM Grand Prix competitions and will be an efficient tracking tool for Technical Stewards. By scanning the label QR code, information relative to the helmet features and the validity of the homologation will be accessible. A link to the tradename webpage will be also available for redirection to the advertising and the web services offered by each single manufacturer. Further, the 3D FIM Hologram will add a high security value to the label in order to guarantee maximum trust in the homologation.

‘This is a true example of technology at the service of sport and safety, we are very proud that this Programme’s launch is under way and that the industry and the whole racing community have welcomed these changes’ explained Fabio Muner, FIM Sports Director.

It is the intention of the FIM to publish by the Valencia GP a list of the helmets manufacturers that have been approved through the FIM Racing Homologation Programme and of those which are working to achieve this.

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CormacGP Shoots Sepang - Capturing The Scene In Malaysia's Tropical Heat


A tire which was too hard even for Marc Marquez saw him doing this a lot. Sometimes, he even crashed


Hafizh Syahrin was inspired at his home race


The duel that never quite happened


That Suzuki GSX-RR is not a bad bike now. Riders are pretty decent now too


A couple more races on the Honda before he switches to a Yamaha. Will Franco Morbidelli start to fly on the M1?


As the season winds down, Johann Zarco winds up


Takaaki Nakagami climbs aboard for the last of the Pacific flyaways


Fast on the factory bike, fast on his own bike. Yet Alvaro Bautista is off to WorldSBK next season


Pole number 80 became win number 70, though the man in the background did everything in his power to prevent that


Pol Espargaro has slowly returned to fitness, and the KTM is starting to show some signs of progress


Full lean for Taka


"You want to know what?" Andrea Dovizioso gets a surprise question


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

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Tom's Tech Treasures: A Closer Look At The Bikes At Motegi

Thomas Morsellino is a French freelance journalist and photographer, with keen eye for the technical details of MotoGP bikes. You may have seen some of his work on Twitter, where he runs the @Off_Bikes account. Peter Bom is a world championship winning former crew chief, with a deep and abiding knowledge of every aspect of motorcycle racing. Peter has worked with such riders as Cal Crutchlow, Danny Kent, and Stefan Bradl. After every race, MotoMatters.com will be publishing a selection of Tom's photos of MotoGP bikes, together with extensive technical explanations of the details by Peter Bom. MotoMatters.com subscribers will get access to the full resolution photos, which they can download and study in detail, and all of Peter's technical explanations of the photos. Readers who do not support the site will be limited to the 800x600 resolution photos, and an explanation of two photos.


Nakasuga’s YZR-M1 exhaust from above
Peter Bom: Exhaust configuration is vital for both power and engine character. Yamaha is using a four-into-two-into-one exhaust combination. Don’t be surprised if next year we see a different exhaust on the M1.


Winglets on GP18 (Dovizioso)
Peter Bom: The base of the winglet is integrated into the skin of the fairing to minimize air turbulence.


Suspension kit, harder or softer depending on the conditions and riding styles


When winglets are needed, just fit them on the fairing


Cooling system on the KTM Moto2 (Ajo) for Motegi and its hard braking points


Neutral push lever for seamless gearboxes (KTM RC16)


Valentino Rossi’s dashboard


System to cool down the water on a Kalex bike (Marc VDS).


Brake pressure and travel sensors on Katsuyuki Nakasuga's Yamaha M1


Tito Rabat’s calipers (used by Xavier Siméon)


Ventilated front mudguard on the RC213V


If you would like access to the full-size versions of these technical photos and all of Peter Bom's explanations, as well as desktop-size versions of the other fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of thes photos, you can email Thomas Morsellino

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Carmelo Ezpeleta Visits Bali - First Step Towards An Indonesian Round Of MotoGP

On Tuesday, Dorna issued a press release together with the Indonesian Tourism Development Company, or ITDC, that brought an Indonesian round of MotoGP one step closer to reality. If the plans come to fruition, MotoGP could be racing on a specially-adapted street circuit on the island of Lombok as early as 2021.

Carmelo Ezpeleta and his son (and MotoGP Sporting Director) Carlos visited Nusa Dua, in the south of Bali, one of Indonesia's favorite destinations for tourists, as guest of the ITDC. While he was there, they hopped across to Lombok, the next island east of Bali, to visit the Mandalika tourist resort on the south coast of Lombok, which is currently under development. 

The plan is for a race to be organized on a circuit using the public roads inside the resort. This is the 'street race' which was rumored much earlier in the year, but about which few details had emerged. Safety concerns are much easier to address, as the layout of the tourist resort will feature wide roads and plenty of open spaces, with plenty of room to create gravel traps and run off. 

Dorna have been very keen to organize a race in Indonesia, both because it is a key market for the manufacturers in MotoGP, and because of the enormous and enthusiastic fan base in the country. They have previously been in discussion with the Sentul circuit, just outside the Indonesian capital Jakarta, and also at a new circuit to be built at Palembang, on the island of Sumatra. Those plans fell through, in part over arguments over financing, and in the case of Sentul, because of political disputes with Tommy Suharto, son of the former president, who is directly involved with the circuit. 

One problem faced by Dorna in organizing a race in Indonesia was the combination of corruption and bureaucracy. There were fears among those involved in the running of a MotoGP weekend that logistics would be difficult, as getting goods through customs on time, and without paying significant bribes, could prove to be a huge challenge, and make the event much more expensive than it would otherwise be. 

Organizing a race at the Mandalika tourist resort would get around a lot of those problems. Mandalika is a so-called Special Economic Tourism Zone, and as such, is exempt from most customs rules for imports into Indonesia. Getting the bikes and equipment into and out of Lombok is much easier, as they are technically never imported into Indonesia, reducing the chances of corruption. Furthermore, organizing a race inside of the Mandalika resort would mean that the entire event is being run by the resort, and as such, would remove much of the corruption caused by local officials. The fact that the event is to be run by the ITDC is also a benefit here, as the government agency has the authority to ensure that the necessary bureaucracy and paperwork is kept to a minimum, as well as the political power to back that up.

Though there is still much to be done before an Indonesian MotoGP race can happen, this project looks the most promising of those which have been proposed so far. The next step would be for a contract to be signed for a race, which would likely be sometime next year, or early 2020 at the latest. 

The press release appears below.


Press Release

The Nusa Dua Bali - Indonesia, November 5th 2018

ITDC (Indonesia Tourism Development Corporation/ PT. Pengembangan Pariwisata Indonesia (Persero)), confirms that between the Australian MotoGP held on Philip Island and the Malaysian Grand Prix, Mr Carmelo Ezpeleta, CEO of Dorna Sports SL, along with the Sporting Director, Mr Carlos Ezpeleta, took a short break to visit the Island of Bali, staying at one of the five-star resorts at the Nusa Dua, a 350-ha integrated Tourism Estate, owned and managed by ITDC.

During this time, Mr Ezpeleta and Mr Abdulbar M. Mansoer, CEO and President Director of ITDC, toured and enjoyed the facilities at the Nusa Dua and also embarked on a day trip to the Island of Lombok to visit the Mandalika, another tourism resort project currently under development by ITDC, situated in the Southern Coast of the Island. Specifically, for this trip, Dorna was visiting a possible location for hosting future Motorbike Race Events within the 1,175-ha integrated tourism estate.

A statement from Mr Abdulbar M. Mansoer reads as follows:

“Mr Carmelo Ezpeleta was primarily at the Nusa Dua for a well-deserved break at the Bali National Golf Club before heading out to Kuala Lumpur for the Malaysian Grand Prix in Sepang. It was not his first time to the Island as he visited the Nusa Dua around 2 years prior beforehand. For this visit, during his busy schedule and on route between the two races, he wanted to visit Bali as well as Lombok, where we welcomed him to the Mandalika and presented a potential concept to host future Motorbike Race Events. His visit was brief, but we believe that he sincerely enjoyed his break and of course we would be very happy to welcome him back to Bali and Lombok in the near future.”

ABOUT ITDC

PT Pengembangan Pariwisata Indonesia (Persero) or Indonesia Tourism Development Corporation (ITDC) is a state-owned enterprise focused in creating new tourism destinations in Indonesia. For over 40 years, ITDC has developed the Nusa Dua as a tourism area in Bali to be one of the world’s most prestigious tourism destinations. Currently in the Nusa Dua, there are 19 starred hotels which offer 5,000+ hotel rooms, shopping centres, a museum, cultural venues, an 18-hole golf course, an international hospital and other tourism amenities. With two international MICE facilities, the Nusa Dua has become host to various international large-scale events, including the UN Climate Change 2007, APEC 2013, Bali Democratic Forum, Miss World 2013 and recently the World Bank IMF Annual Meetings. Consistently managed with an environmentally friendly concept, the Nusa Dua has earned various awards such as Kalpataru of the Government of the Republic of Indonesia and certification of Tri Hita Karana of Tri Hita arana Bali Foundation, Indonesia Sustainable Tourism Award 2017 as well as ASEAN Sustainable Tourism Award 2018. At the global level, in 2004, the Nusa Dua obtained the first Certification of Green Globe 21 Asia Pacific in the world for “Community Resort” category awarded by Green Globe Foundation, a global institution supported by the UN.

THE MANDALIKA

The Mandalika, an Integrated Tourism Complex is situated in the South of Lombok, Indonesia next to the neighboring Island of Bali. The destination itself is designated a Special Economic Tourism Zone, encompassing a total area of 1.175 ha of prime Real Estate specifically dedicated for the development of an International Tourism Complex. With 16km of Beachfront, the Mandalika is managed under ITDC, which is known for the development and management of the Nusa Dua Tourism Complex in Bali, Indonesia.

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Sepang MotoGP Race Schedule Moved 2 Hours Earlier Due To Expected Weather

The schedule for race day at the 2018 Malaysian Grand Prix has been modified, due to expected heavy rain. The entire day has been moved 2 hours earlier, in an attempt to avoid a downpour expected to arrive at around 3pm local time on Sunday afternoon.

The change had been requested by the riders in the Safety Commission on Friday evening. Heavy rain on Saturday helped make their point: a torrential downpour starting in FP4 caused qualifying to be delayed. The rain in FP4 caught several riders out quite badly, with Jordi Torres falling and injuring his wrist, Maverick Viñales crashing and destroying his Yamaha M1.

As the paddock waited for the start of a delayed Q1 session to start, IRTA, who are in charge of the running of each MotoGP round, issued a new schedule, moving the entire program back 2 hours earlier, meaning the MotoGP race will now start on Sunday at 1pm local time, instead of 3pm.

The new schedule is as follows (click the link to convert to your local time):

Moto3 race: 10am MYT
Moto2 race: 11:20am MYT
MotoGP race: 1pm MYT

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CormacGP Shoots Phillip Island - The Glory Of Phillip Island


Would the Yamaha be competitive at Phillip Island? Of course it would


Jackass was outstanding at his home round, but couldn't match the pace at the end of the race


Heavy wind, cold temperatures, hard tires. Dani Pedrosa's kryptonite trifecta


Big data, big difference


The King of Phillip Island? Only in odd years


Karel Abraham got a free upgrade in Australia


Little did Johann Zarco suspect what awaited him


Still not working the way it should for Valentino Rossi


Alvaro Bautista exceeded expectations in Australia. What a difference a factory bike, and a factory team, can make


Up, over, and down again. That's the magic of Phillip Island


Relations haven't always been this cordial. Winning cures a lot of ills


If you'd like to have very high-resolution (4K) versions of the fantastic photos which appear on the site, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. A subscription will also give you access to the many in-depth and exclusive articles we produce for MotoMatters.com site supporters. The more readers who join our growing band of site supporters, the better we can make MotoMatters.com, and the more readers will get out of the website.

If you would like to buy a copy of one of these photos, you can email Cormac Ryan Meenan

If you'd like to see more of Cormac's work, you can follow him on Twitter or Instagram, or check out his website, cormacgp.com.

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Stefan Bradl To Replace Injured Cal Crutchlow

Stefan Bradl is to replace Cal Crutchlow on the LCR Honda at the next round of MotoGP at Sepang, a week from today. As HRC's official test rider, Bradl was the easy choice to take the place of the injured Crutchlow.

Crutchlow was ruled out of Sunday's Australian Grand Prix after a huge crash at Turn 1 during FP2 on Friday. His right leg took a beating in the fall, fracturing his ankle in three places. Crutchlow was flown to Melbourne, where an external cage was placed on his ankle to fix the bones in place while the swelling subsides. Crutchlow is due for further surgery on Thursday to have the bones plated.

That rules Crutchlow out of the race at Sepang, and makes him doubtful for the Valencia race in three weeks' time. A decision on Valencia will not be made until much nearer the event, but it is conceivable that Crutchlow will decide to sit out the race, and focus on being fit for the last test of the year at Jerez at the end of November.

Stefan Bradl will take the place of Cal Crutchlow in the LCR Honda team at Sepang, and if the Englishman is not fit to race at Valencia, then at the final race as well. Bradl would have been present at Valencia anyway, both because of TV duties with the Austrian Servus TV, and for the first post-season test at Valencia on the Tuesday and Wednesday after the race.

There is some small irony in Bradl being drafted in to replace Crutchlow at LCR. Crutchlow took the place of the German in the LCR Honda team at the end of the 2014, when team boss Lucio Cecchinello decided to gamble on the Englishman, rather than continue with Bradl.

Below are two press releases from the LCR Honda squad, giving some detail on Crutchlow's injury, and announcing Stefan Bradl as his replacement.


MEDICAL UPDATE ON LCR HONDA CASTROL RIDER CAL CRUTCHLOW

PRESS RELEASE: 28 October 2018 | Medical Report

The LCR Honda CASTROL Team can provide an update on the condition of Cal Crutchlow who suffered an ankle injury at the Australian Grand Prix on Friday. The Briton rider crashed out at the first corner of the Phillip Island circuit, sustaining damage that ruled him out of the remainder of the MotoGP event.

Lucio Cecchinello (LCR Team Principal): “Cal arrived at Alfred Hospital by helicopter very quickly after the crash and his initial treatment in the medical centre at the race track. We are very grateful for this because, despite his serious injury, it was not compulsory, but everyone was very keen for him to be taken to hospital by helicopter”.

“Once he arrived, he had a full body scan which confirmed that the only part of his body injured in the crash was his right ankle. The fracture he sustained to it involved both the ankle malleolus and distal tibia. Dr. Lazarus and the surgery team led by Dr. Edwards – who successfully operated on the right ankle of Dani Pedrosa many years ago – carried out a first procedure which was a fracture reduction and alignment and external fixation with the use of a cage”.

“This first surgery took 45 minutes and was simply to put the bone back into the perfect position for a second operation. That will take place on Wednesday or Thursday once the swelling to the ankle has gone down and will most likely involve inserting three small plates to keep the bone in place and guarantee the best possible recovery”.

“The plan is that he will then be discharged three days after the second operation, which is next weekend. We will be in Malaysia at that time, so Cal will fly home instead and try to recover as quickly as possible. He will be able to start physiotherapy two weeks after the surgery to try and get himself fit as quickly as he can.”


HRC TEST RIDER STEFAN BRADL TO RIDE FOR LCR HONDA AT MALAYSIAN GP

PRESS RELEASE: 28 October 2018 | Official Announcement

Following LCR Honda CASTROL rider Cal Crutchlow’s injury at Phillip Island, the LCR Honda Team has confirmed that HRC Test rider Stefan Bradl will replace the Briton at the Sepang Grand Prix. Crutchlow – who headed to Australia in great form after his second place at Motegi – suffered a fracture to his right ankle and distal tibia after a heavy fall at the famous coastal circuit on Friday and won’t be able to participate to the Malaysian GP next week.

Stefan Bradl (HRC Test Rider): “First of all I want to say it’s a great pity for Cal because he was in good form after the podium in Japan and the last few races. I hope he has a speedy recovery. It’s a good opportunity for me, it’s a nice comeback (to the LCR Team) as we had three years together and there are a lot of people I know in the team. I also want to thank HRC and Lucio for reacting so quickly and professionally to this situation. Now let’s see what we can do, I’m looking forward to seeing the guys and working with them again.”

Lucio Cecchinello (LCR Team Principal): “Obviously we are very disappointed about Cal’s crash in Friday’s FP2 session and the resulting fracture of the right ankle. But this is part of racing and we must accept if even if we do not like it. Cal’s orthopaedic problem will be successfully fixed in few weeks. The whole team wish him a very speed recovery and in the meantime we move to Malaysia for the penultimate round of the season with another LCR former racer. Stefan Bradl raced in LCR colours for three years in the premier class (2012, 2013 and 2014) and we know all about his remarkable skills and undeniable talent. We are happy to be back in the garage together”.

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