Bridgestone's Edge-Treated Tires: Tailor-made For Lorenzo, Or Good For Everybody?

The 2015 MotoGP championship is one of the closest in years. Close championships are always fascinating, but this one has an extra edge to it: the two men fighting over the 2015 title are both teammates, and racing on the same bike. The differences between the Yamaha M1s of Valentino Rossi and Jorge Lorenzo are virtually non-existent, their results dependent entirely on the riders themselves, and how well their teams prepare the bikes and riders for the race.

With nothing to choose between the bikes, focus has turned to the tires. Jorge Lorenzo's constant references to his preference for the tire with the special edge treatment have made this focus much keener. Under the glaring spotlight of public scrutiny, the allocation of tires which Bridgestone brings to each race has taken on the appearance of being the decisive factor in every race. Before every race weekend in MotoGP, the one question I get asked most via Social Media (other than "who do you think will win?" of course), is whether Bridgestone will be bringing the tires with the edge treatment or not.

This focus on tires is becoming so intense that a number of misconceptions about Bridgestone's rear tires are starting to arise. Some fans are starting to believe that Bridgestone are manipulating the results by bringing the special tires to some races, but not to others. They are starting to believe that tire choice is the sole deciding factor in races. They are even starting to believe that Jorge Lorenzo is the only rider who likes the tires with the edge treatment, and that those tires are an actual disadvantage for most, if not all of the other riders on the grid.

That tires have been a factor is something I have been keeping an eye on for a while. I have had numerous discussions with Bridgestone staff throughout the year, questioning them on the circumstances and process behind the tires and tire choice. At Silverstone, I also questioned a number of riders on how they feel about the tires, and whether they prefer the tires with the edge treatment, or are hindered by them in some way. Given the stakes, I did not ask Jorge Lorenzo or Valentino Rossi about it, but instead got a range of riders with different manufacturers to give their opinions.

Guest Blog: Mat Oxley - Rossi and the silver screen

MotoMatters.com is delighted to feature the work of iconic MotoGP writer Mat Oxley. Oxley is a former racer, TT winner and highly respected author of biographies of world champions Mick Doohan and Valentino Rossi, and currently writes for Motor Sport Magazine, where he is MotoGP correspondent. We are featuring sections from Oxley's blogs, which are posted in full on the Motor Sport Magazine website.


Rossi and the silver screen

The church bells in Tavullia rang out on Sunday afternoon, as they always do when the town’s local hero wins a Grand Prix. I only know this because I watched the new MotoGP documentary Hitting the Apex last week.

The film’s advertised stars are Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo, Casey Stoner, Dani Pedrosa, Marc Márquez and Marco Simoncelli, but (in my mind at least), its greatest stars are Tavullia’s priests, Don Cesare Stefani and Don Giuseppe Signoretti.

The pair sit in their church (called, oh the irony, the Church of San Lorenzo the Martyr), remembering the last Saturday of June 2013, when they rang the bells to celebrate the Assen victory that marked Rossi’s return to the top step after two miserable seasons that were surely the beginning of his inevitable decline into retirement.

Scott Jones Shoots Silverstone - Rainy Race Day


In the wet, there was only ever going to be one winner from this battle


Clear visors make watching motorcycle racing in the rain even more interesting


Smoke, steam, or spray? You choose

Bridgestone Press Release: Shinji Aoki On Racing On Wet Tires At Silverstone

British MotoGP™ debrief with Shinji Aoki
Tuesday, September 1 2015

Bridgestone slick options: Front: Extra-soft, Soft & Medium; Rear: Soft, Medium & Hard (Asymmetric)
Bridgestone wet tyre options: Soft (Main), Hard (Alternative)

The 2015 British Grand Prix was won in dramatic style by Movistar Yamaha MotoGP’s Valentino Rossi who mastered the wet conditions at Silverstone to win ahead of Danilo Petrucci and Andrea Dovizioso.

A dry race was on the cards until a late change in the weather resulted in all riders riding into pit lane during the warm up lap to swap to their bikes fitted with wet tyres, resulting in race control deciding to restart the race. In the end all riders started and completed the race on the soft compound wet tyres front and rear as the rain continued for the full duration of the British Grand Prix.

Q&A with Shinji Aoki – Manager, Bridgestone Motorcycle Tyre Development Department

Round Number: 
12
Year: 
2015

Scott Jones Shoots Silverstone - Saturday Qualifying


Bradl The Brilliant Bavarian. Pretty good on an Aprilia too.


Bradley Smith. The sixth best motorcycle racer in the world, at the moment


Speed. Andrea Iannone in motion

2015 Silverstone MotoGP Post-Race Press Releases

Press Releases from the teams, Bridgestone and others after Sunday's soaked MotoGP race:

Round Number: 
12
Year: 
2015

2015 Silverstone Moto2 And Moto3 Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the Moto2 and Moto3 teams after Sunday's races at Silverstone:

2015 Silverstone MotoGP Sunday Round Up: Controlling The Uncontrollable, And Championships Drawing Closer

The key to success in motorcycle racing is to control the variables which you can control, and adapt to the ones which you can't. The British round of MotoGP at Silverstone turned out to be all about those variables, the controllable and the uncontrollable, about right and wrong choices, and about adapting to the conditions.

The one variable over which those involved in motorcycle racing don't have any control is the weather. Especially at Silverstone, especially at the end of summer. That it should rain is utterly unsurprising. That it should rain during a MotoGP race even more so. The outcome of the MotoGP race – and in fact, the outcome of all three races at Silverstone – was entirely predictable: the rider who was both best prepared and best able to adapt to the conditions won. Behind the winners – Valentino Rossi, Johann Zarco and Danny Kent – came a mixture of those who adapted and those who didn't, those who had controlled the variables, and those who had overlooked some of the variables they could control.

Rain may have been predictable on Sunday, but the timing of the rain created an entirely unpredictable situation. The Moto2 race had started in the wet, the track drying after the rain eased off, wet tires getting chewed up as the laps reeled off. The MotoGP riders went to the grid on a track with a clear dry line, slick tires the right choice for the conditions, though there were a couple of corners where the riders had their doubts. Reports coming in to Race Direction from the marshal posts around the track said the track was dry, the fine drizzle falling not making an impact on the track. The driver of the safety car reported spotting on the windscreen during his lap of the circuit before the start of the warm up lap. Race Director Mike Webb declared a dry race with five minutes to go to the start, and with the keen sense of irony which the weather gods always seem to possess, that proved to be the signal for the rain to start getting heavier, especially around the southern end of the circuit.

2015 Moto3 Championship Standings After Round 12, Silverstone, Great Britain

Championship standings for round 12, 2015

2015 Silverstone Moto3 Race Result: Cool Head Prevails In A War Of Attrition

Result and summary of the Moto3 race at Silverstone:

2015 MotoGP Championship Standings After Round 12, Silverstone, Great Britain

MotoGP Championship standings for round 12, 2015

2015 Silverstone MotoGP Race Report: Rain Produces Plenty Of Surprises

Results and summary of a fascinating MotoGP race at Silverstone:

2015 Moto2 Championship Standings After Race 12, Silverstone, Great Britain

Championship standings for round 12, 2015

2015 Silverstone Moto2 Race Result: Domination Under Treacherous Conditions

Results and summary of the Moto2 race at Silverstone:

Scott Redding Confirmed with Pramac Ducati For 2016

Scott Redding is to ride for Pramac Ducati in 2016. The Pramac squad announced today that the British rider will be riding alongside Danilo Petrucci on board a Ducati Desmosedici GP15.

The news means that Redding is to leave the Marc VDS squad, who had moved up to MotoGP to form a team around the English rider. But Redding never gelled with the Honda RC213V which he has been racing this year, and found it difficult to get any feeling with the bike. Redding only occasionally showed flashes of his potential, struggling outside of the top ten for most of the season. 

Redding had made no secret of his desire to leave. At Assen, he told reporters of his regrets about choosing the Honda, letting slip that he was keeping an eye on the Pramac team, and the performance of the bike. Redding had a test with Ducati in 2012, and had come away enthusiastic about the bike, and working with Ducati. Ducati were also very positive about Redding, and were keen to get him inside the factory's orbit.

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