Honda

2014 Sepang World Superbike And World Supersport Sunday Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the organizers and from the teams after Sunday's World Superbike and World Supersport races at Sepang:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2014

2014 Sepang World Superbike And World Supersport Saturday Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizers and World Superbike and World Supersport teams after qualifying at Sepang:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2014

2014 Sepang World Superbike And World Supersport Friday Post-Practice Press Releases

Press releases from the series organizer and the World Superbike and World Supersport teams after the first day of practice at Sepang:


Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2014

2014 Sepang World Superbike And World Supersport Preview Press Releases

Press releases previewing the first ever visit of the World Superbike series to the Sepang International Circuit:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2014

Nicky Hayden Has Wrist Surgery To Clean Up Injured Joint

Nicky Hayden has had surgery on his right wrist to attempt to cure the continuing problems the American has had. On Tuesday morning, Dr Riccardo Luchetti performed arthroscopic surgery to remove floating material and clean up various arthritic build up which had occurred after previous injuries. Hayden also had anti-inflammatory drugs injected directly into the joint, in an attempt to reduce the swelling which was present.

Hayden is hoping to return to action at Barcelona, in just under two weeks' time.

Below is the press release issued by the team:


NICKY HAYDEN UNDERGOES SUCCESSFUL SURGERY IN ITALY

DRIVE M7 Aspar rider undergoes arthroscopic cleaning of right wrist, carried out by Dr Riccardo Luchetti

Nicky Hayden underwent surgery today to cure a niggling wrist problem that caused him to pull out of the recent Italian Grand Prix. The American had already ridden through the pain at the previous rounds in Spain and France, and falling on it again in Le Mans after the contact with Iannone did not help to his situation. But the discomfort proved too much at the more demanding Mugello circuit and the DRIVE M7 Aspar Team rider took the doctors' advice to take no further part in the Grand Prix and to go under the knife today. The operation started at 8:10am and took around an hour and a half.

Marc VDS, LCR Considering MotoGP Expansion For 2015, But No More Production Hondas Available

The 2015 MotoGP grid is shaping up to look even stronger than this season. There are increasing signs that the weaker teams on the grid are set to disappear, with the strongest teams in Moto2 moving up to take their place. In addition, there is a chance that some of the stronger existing MotoGP teams could expand their participation as well.

It is an open secret that the Marc VDS Racing team is weighing up a switch to MotoGP. Team boss Michael Bartholemy has had initial talks with the team owner Marc van der Straten about adding a MotoGP entry to their line up, but they are still a long way from making a decision. Bartholemy told MotoMatters.com that a decision on their participation would come at Assen at the earliest, but admitted that it was still a very serious option.

The end of June would be too late for Kalex to get a chassis ready in time for 2015 to accept a leased Yamaha engine, but Bartholemy explained that that need not be a problem. Kalex have got permission from Yamaha to start work on a frame already, and have the specifications they need to get started, Bartholemy said.

2014 Mugello MotoGP Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams after Sunday's epic Italian Grand Prix at Mugello:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2014

2014 Mugello Moto2 and Moto3 Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the Moto2 and Moto3 teams after Sunday's races at Mugello:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2014

2014 Mugello MotoGP Sunday Round Up: A Race To Remember Under The Tuscan Sun

One circuit, three races, all of them utterly different in nature. The wide, flowing layout with a long straight, fast corners, and multiple combinations of turns present very different challenges to Grand Prix racing's three different classes. For Moto3, escape is impossible, the race coming down to tactics and the ability to pick the right slipstream. In Moto2, it is possible to get away, but it's equally possible to chase an escaped rider down. And in MotoGP, the fast flicks make it possible to both defend attacks and launch your own counter attack. Mugello is a wonderful circuit, and it served up a spectacular portion of racing on Sunday.

We had expected Moto3 to be the race of the day, as it has been every Grand Prix this season. It certainly did not disappoint, but by the time the last few laps of the MotoGP race rolled around, we had forgotten all about Moto3. The Moto3 race was fantastic entertainment, but the MotoGP race at Mugello was one for the ages. The kind of race that fans will bring up over and over again, one to go along with Barcelona 2009, Laguna Seca 2008, even Silverstone 1979.

It took the return of the real Jorge Lorenzo to light a fire under the MotoGP race. Lorenzo had been looking stronger and stronger all weekend, and was coming to a track where he has previously dominated, and with tires which, he had been told, were identical to last year. Lorenzo's punishing cardio workout schedule now back on track and paying dividends. The fitness he lost when three operations during the off season forced him to abandon his normal training schedule cost him dearly.

2014 Mugello Saturday Round Up: Signs Of Marquez' Weakness, The Importance Of Equipment, And The Rocketship Ducati

Knowing that not everyone is in a position to watch qualifying and races when they are live, we try to operate a no-spoilers policy for at least a few hours after the event. No results in headlines, nor on the MotoMatters Twitter feed. But as the mighty motorcycle racing Twitter personality SofaRacer put it today, ' I know you don't like to Tweet spoilers David. But 'Márquez on pole' and 'Márquez wins' technically, erm, aren't.' To the surprise of absolutely nobody, Marc Marquez took his sixth pole of the season, and his seventh pole in a row on Sunday. Marquez remains invincible, even at what he regards as his worst track of the year.

His advantage is rather modest, though. With just 0.180 seconds over the man in second place – the surprising Andrea Iannone – it is Marquez' smallest advantage of the season, if we discount Qatar, where he was basically riding with a broken leg. You get the sense that Marquez is holding something back, almost being cautious, after being bitten several times by the track last year, including a massive crash in free practice and then sliding out of the race. It makes him almost vulnerable for the first time. His race pace is still fast, but he has others – Valentino Rossi, Jorge Lorenzo, Dani Pedrosa, even the Ducatis of Andrea Iannone and Andrea Dovizioso – all on roughly the same pace.

Nicky Hayden Out For Mugello, To Have Surgery On Wrist On Tuesday

As expected, Nicky Hayden has withdrawn from the Mugello round of MotoGP. His right wrist, which is still swollen and inflamed, is causing him too much pain to be able to ride safely. Hayden is scheduled to have surgery on the wrist on Tuesday in Italy.

The problems with Hayden's wrist started in Valencia in 2011, in the first corner crash at the last race of that season. He broke the scaphoid bone in his hand, and had surgery to pin the bone together. Another crash at Austin aggravated the injury, and since then, the wrist has occasionally flared up and caused him problems. Hayden had surgery last December to remove the screw holding the scaphoid together and have a bone graft, but at Jerez the wrist started causing problems again, with no real cause. 'I didn't crash, I didn't really have a big moment or anything. It just suddenly started hurting real bad in the middle of the night,' Hayden said. Another crash at Le Mans didn't help the situation, and at Mugello, he hasn't really been able to ride, doing just eleven laps in total on Friday.

2014 Mugello MotoGP Friday Round Up: On Wasted Sessions, A Feisty Rossi, And American Joy And Despair

The weather didn't really play ball at Mugello on Friday. The forecast rain held off until the last five minutes of Moto3 FP2, before sprinkling just enough water on the track to make conditions too wet for slicks, too dry for wet tires. That left the entire MotoGP field sitting in their garages waiting for the rain to either get heavier and wet the track completely, or else stop, and allow it to dry up. Dani Pedrosa explained that though the track was dry in most places, San Donato, the first corner at the end of the high speed straight, was still wet. Bridgestone slicks need to be pushed hard to get them up to temperature, and if you can't push in Turn 1, then they don't. That leaves you with cold tires, which will come back and bite you further round the track.

One of the items on the list of requirements Dorna sent to Michelin was the need for an intermediate tire. Would anyone have gone out if they had had intermediates? Pedrosa believed they would have. 'With intermediates you can go out. I'm not sure whether you get anything out of it, but for sure you don't have 24 bikes in the box.' You don't learn much in terms of set up when you go out on intermediates, but more people might venture out. One team manager I spoke to was less convinced. 'We have five engines and a limited number of tires. We can't afford to lose an engine in a crash. Why take a risk, when it's better to save miles on the engine?'

2014 Mugello MotoGP Friday Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after the first day of practice at Mugello:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2014

2014 Mugello MotoGP Preview Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone previewing the Italian Grand Prix at Mugello:

Round Number: 
6
Year: 
2014

2014 Mugello MotoGP Preview: Rossi's Revival In Race 300, And How Marquez And Moto2 Are Changing MotoGP

The paradox of the motorcycle racer is that every race is a big race, yet no race is more important than any other. The pressure on the MotoGP elite is so great that they have to perform at their maximum at every circuit, every weekend. Every race is like a championship decider, not just the race which decides the championship. There may be extra pressure at a home race, or on a special occasion, or when a title is at stake, but the riders cannot let it get to them. There is too much at stake to be overawed by the occasion.

Still, Mugello 2014 is a very big race indeed. It is Valentino Rossi's 300th Grand Prix, and a chance for him to return to the podium on merit again, and not just because the crowds were calling his name. It is the best hope of a Jorge Lorenzo revival, the Yamaha man having won the last three races in a row at the spectacular Tuscan track. It is the best hope for Ducati, the Italian factory having run well here in the past. And it is the first realistic chance for Marc Marquez to fail, the Spaniard has never found the track an easy one, though it did not stop him winning there.

Valentino Rossi heads into the race weekend more optimistic than he has been in years. Though Misano is closer to Rossi's home in Tavullia – it is literally walking distance, though it is a long walk indeed – Mugello is the Italian's spiritual home, the track he loves most in the world.

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