Latest News

Bridgestone To Offer Three Different Specs Of Front Tire For 2014

Bridgestone is to add an extra compound of front tire for MotoGP riders to choose from. After complaints from the teams over problems at some circuits, Bridgestone has responded by expanding the number of front tires allowed for each rider from 9 to 10, and adding an extra compound of front tire to help deal with differing conditions.

The change to the allocation had long been a wish of the MotoGP riders. Though Bridgestone's two selected compounds performed well under most conditions, a sudden drop in temperatures sometimes left riders and teams struggling. The problem was most pronounced in the morning sessions at circuits like Valencia and Aragon, where temperatures can be very cold. There were several front end crashes in those morning sessions, as tires struggled to get up to temperature. Adding a softer tire should make the morning practice sessions safer, and allow teams to work on setup without compromising safety.

The added tire also makes Bridgestone's job a little easier. The tire firm already produces rubber which works under an exceptionally wide range of temperatures and conditions, and expanding that to handle the more exceptional conditions was an expensive business. Adding a special softer tire for cold mornings means they can optimize their tire selection for expected conditions in the afternoon, giving teams better tires for the race.

Riders will initially be provided with 7 tires: 3 of the medium and 3 of the hard compound, and 1 of the softer compound. Adopting the terminology of Formula One, the medium and hard compounds will be viewed as the 'Prime' compounds, while the softer compound is regarded as the 'Option' tire. After practice on Thursday, riders will be allowed to select a further 3 tires, which can be 3 of any combination of the Prime tires, or 1 or 2 extra Option tires, plus the remainder in Prime tires.

By conceding to demands from Dorna and the Safety Commission, Bridgestone has (at least in part) demonstrated their willingness to solve some of the issues which remain with the single tire. Whether this should be regarded as a display that Bridgestone is still determined to retain the spec tire contract when it comes up for renewal at the end of this year remains to be seen.

The press release from Bridgestone explaining the change appears below:


Bridgestone expands front tyre allocation for MotoGP™ riders

Tuesday, 29 April 2014

Bridgestone, the Official Tyre Supplier to MotoGP™ has made a revision to the front slick tyre allocation system to give riders more choice and a greater number of tyres at each race weekend.

The change in the allocation means each rider will now be able to choose their front tyre allocation from three different compound options, whereas before only two compound options were available. Additionally, the total number of front slicks each rider can use per race weekend increases from nine to ten tyres. The decision to change the front slick tyre allocation was made following last weekend’s Argentina Grand Prix, where the provision of three front slick options for the inaugural race at Autodromo Termas de Rio Hondo was welcomed by the riders and teams.

The change in front tyre allocation was ratified by the FIM and Dorna, and will take effect from this weekend’s Spanish Grand Prix at Jerez.

Hiroshi Yamada - Manager, Bridgestone Motorsport Department

“This change to the front slick tyre allocation will give riders greater choice at each race weekend, and will ensure that we have a tyre allocation that can manage any weather or track conditions encountered. MotoGP machines are becoming ever more demanding on tyres, with improved lap times and a greater variety in the performance characteristics between bikes, so an increased front tyre allocation will benefit everybody. Following the positive experience with the expanded front slick allocation at the Argentina Grand Prix, Bridgestone proposed to offer three front slick compound options to riders for the entire MotoGP season, and the FIM and Dorna have agreed to implement this change.”

Below is a summary of the new front tyre allocation system.

10 front slicks per rider (up from nine) from three compound options (up from two compounds)

Riders can select a maximum of six slicks in either of the two prime specification compounds, and a maximum of three of the option specification compound.

Each rider will receive an initial allocation of seven front tyres and can choose the rest of their allocation following FP2.

After FP2, each rider can choose three extra tyres to complete their allocation. The rider can choose a maximum of three front tyres in either of the prime allocation compounds. Alternatively, each rider can select a maximum of two front tyres from the option compound, plus one of the prime compounds to make up their full allocation of ten front tyres.

This table illustrates the front slicks available to every rider each weekend, up to a total of ten tyres. The yellow boxes indicate the riders’ initial tyre allocation.

  1 2 3 4 5 6
Prime (e.g. Medium)
Prime (e.g. Soft)
Option (e.g. Hard)      

The previous front tyre allocation system is shown below.

  1 2 3 4 5 6
Harder
Softer

 

Bridgestone is to add an extra compound of front tire for MotoGP riders to choose from. After complaints from the teams over problems at some circuits, Bridgestone has responded by expanding the number of front tires allowed for each rider from 9 to 10, and adding an extra compound of front tire to help deal with differing conditions.The change to the allocation had long been a wish of the MotoGP riders. Though Bridgestone's two selected compounds performed well under most conditions, a sudden drop in temperatures sometimes left riders and teams struggling. The problem was most pronounced in the morning sessions at circuits like Valencia and Aragon, where temperatures can be very cold. There were several front end crashes in those morning sessions, as tires struggled to get up to temperature. Adding a softer tire should make the morning practice sessions safer, and allow teams to work on setup without compromising safety.

Romano Fenati Handed Penalty Point For Last-Corner Pass, But Result Stands

The clash between Romano Fenati, Jack Miller and Alex Marquez in the final two corners of the Moto3 race in Argentina has not gone completely unpunished. The Italian rider has been issued a penalty point for the misdemeanour, but the race result will stand unchanged.

The incident happened on the last lap at the final section of the Termas de Rio Hondo circuit, turns 13 and 14. Miller had taken the lead from Marquez braking for turn 13, when Fenati came through, bumping both Marquez and Miller out of the way. Fenati held on to take his first victory of the season, Marquez taking 2nd and Miller demoted to 3rd. Miller was incandescent afterwards, saying that he felt he had been robbed of victory, as he had been planning the move to take the lead all lap long, and had the situation under control. Fenati said that his problem had been his front tire, he had lost control which had forced him to enter the corner too hot and bump both Marquez and Miller wide.

Race Direction announced immediately after the race that they would investigate the issue.  A hearing was held with all three riders involved, the result of which was that Romano Fenati was issued a penalty point. The race result was allowed to stand, Fenati keeping his win, Marquez remaining 2nd and Miller 3rd. Miller decided not to appeal the result. 'Do you really think a protest would change the result?' Miller asked rhetorically.

Similar last-lap incidents have gone unpunished, setting a precedent to allow riders a little more leniency in the heat of battle on the very last lap. Marc Marquez' clash with Jorge Lorenzo in the final corner at Jerez was a similar incident, but that passed without penalty points being issued. Race Direction later took the view that it may have been better to have awarded Marquez a penalty point at that point in time, but by then it was too late. Awarding Fenati a penalty point while not changing the result of the race appears to be a compromise, discouraging excessively wild passing attempts while still allowing riders to attempt to win a race if they still have a chance.

The clash between Romano Fenati, Jack Miller and Alex Marquez in the final two corners of the Moto3 race in Argentina has not gone completely unpunished. The Italian rider has been issued a penalty point for the misdemeanour, but the race result will stand unchanged.

The Termas De Rio Hondo Circuit in Argentina: Facts and Figures

The Argentinian round of MotoGP will be the first time a major racing series has visited the Termas de Rio Hondo, the brand new circuit in northern Argentina. As the track is still so new, the circuit designers - Dromo Racetrack Design from Italy - have produced some background material containing key facts about the circuit.

Alongside the list of facts, there are also a couple of interesting infographics giving a better idea of what the track is like. There is a track map showing the elevation change on the circuit. But most interesting of all, is the map created using simulation software to estimate which corner will be taken in which gear, and what speeds will be reached. 

As a primer to getting an idea of what to expect this weekend, these infographics, along with the press release from Marc VDS Racing and video lap, are great place to start. Action starts in Argentina on Thursday.


Termas de Rio Hondo MotoGP Lap Time - Simulated with DroCAS™ [Infographic]

Using DroCAS™ simulators, Dromo designed the racetrack as per vehicle dynamics and to enhance rider's skills capabilities.

The result is a fast flowing racetrack as provided in the infographics.

Name: Autodromo Termas de Rio Hondo
Length: 4806m
Width: 16m
Right corners: 9
Left corners: 5
Twist index: 0.952
Simulated MotoGP Ideal LapTime (3D): 1'34.302

Tire cornering data:  
Laptime on left edge: 32.35%
Laptime on right edge: 45.96%
 
Distance on left edge: 32.28%
Distance on right edge: 38.42%
 
Average speed on left edge: 198.66 Kph
Average speed on right edge: 169.81 Kph
 
Racetrack Designer: Jarno Zaffelli (Dromo)

The Argentinian round of MotoGP will be the first time a major racing series has visited the Termas de Rio Hondo, the brand new circuit in northern Argentina. As the track is still so new, the circuit designers - Dromo Racetrack Design from Italy - have produced some background material containing key facts about the circuit.Alongside the list of facts, there are also a couple of interesting infographics giving a better idea of what the track is like. There is a track map showing the elevation change on the circuit. But most interesting of all, is the map created using simulation software to estimate which corner will be taken in which gear, and what speeds will be reached. As a primer to getting an idea of what to expect this weekend, these infographics, along with the press release from Marc VDS Racing and video lap, are great place to start. Action starts in Argentina on Thursday.Termas de Rio Hondo MotoGP Lap Time - Simulated with DroCAS™ [Infographic]Using DroCAS™ simulators, Dromo designed the racetrack as per vehicle dynamics and to enhance rider's skills capabilities.The result is a fast flowing racetrack as provided in the infographics.

Cal Crutchlow To Miss Argentinian MotoGP Round, Pirro To Substitute

Cal Crutchlow is to miss the Argentinian round of MotoGP at the Termas de Rio Hondo circuit. The Factory Ducati rider is still recovering from surgery on the hand he injured during the race at Austin, and is not yet fit enough to race. Crutchlow will be replaced by Ducati test rider Michele Pirro in Argentina.

After his crash at Austin, Crutchlow was originally diagnosed with just a dislocated little finger on his right hand. However, when the swelling on the hand refused to subside, Crutchlow went in for further scans on his right hand in California. There it was found that the finger was still dislocated and was also broken. Crutchlow had surgery to insert a  pin into the broken bone to stabilize it. Despite that operation, the 28-year-old Englishman's hand is still swollen, and is in too much pain for him to be competitive. Instead, Crutchlow will fly home to the Isle of Man to continue his recovery, and will prepare for his return at Jerez.

In a press release issued today by the Factory Ducati team, Crutchlow was quoted as saying 'I am very sad to let the team down like this because I was really looking forward to racing in Argentina. On Tuesday I had some scans on my hand and we saw that my finger was still dislocated from the crash and also broken so Dr. Chao decided to put a pin in to stabilize it. Unfortunately I'm still feeling too much pain in my right hand, my knuckles are the most painful part and I'm not in condition to race this weekend. Now I'm going back to the UK to continue treatment and try and get ready for the race at Jerez.'

Cal Crutchlow is to miss the Argentinian round of MotoGP at the Termas de Rio Hondo circuit. The Factory Ducati rider is still recovering from surgery on the hand he injured during the race at Austin, and is not yet fit enough to race. Crutchlow will be replaced by Ducati test rider Michele Pirro in Argentina.After his crash at Austin, Crutchlow was originally diagnosed with just a dislocated little finger on his right hand. However, when the swelling on the hand refused to subside, Crutchlow went in for further scans on his right hand in California. There it was found that the finger was still dislocated and was also broken. Crutchlow had surgery to insert a  pin into the broken bone to stabilize it. Despite that operation, the 28-year-old Englishman's hand is still swollen, and is in too much pain for him to be competitive. Instead, Crutchlow will fly home to the Isle of Man to continue his recovery, and will prepare for his return at Jerez.

End In Sight For Bridgestone As MotoGP Tire Supplier?

in

Big changes look to be coming to MotoGP's spec tire system. Now in the sixth season of having a single official supplier, MotoGP is moving closer to seeing the number and variety of tires drastically expanded. With the contract with Bridgestone due to expire at the end of 2014, there is even a serious chance that a new manufacturer could take over from the Japanese tire firm.

A report in the latest issue of the Spanish magazine Motociclismo (available via the Zinio platform), the magazine is reporting that Dorna is looking to change the way that the single tire supply works. Dorna representative Javier Alonso told Motociclismo that negotiations had been opened with several suppliers, including Michelin, Pirelli and Dunlop, as well as current supplier Bridgestone. Dorna had presented Bridgestone with a list of conditions drawn up by the Safety Commission, the liaison body in which the riders discuss safety issues with representatives of Dorna, hosted by safety officer Loris Capirossi.

Though Alonso does not explicitly name the conditions, he does give Motociclismo some context behind their thinking. The idea is to expand the range of tires available at each race, as it has been all too common in recent history for riders to turn up at a particular track only to find that just one of the two compounds available will work. Though the Bridgestone tires have proven to be excellent in terms of both grip and durability, Alonso said, they had proven to be 'difficult for riders to understand sometimes.' The spec tire has also been blamed for creating problems for Ducati. The current tire forces manufacturers to pursue a particular direction in chassis design, which has favored Yamaha and Honda. The intention is not to force Bridgestone to design tires especially for each manufacturer, as Pirelli does in World Superbikes, but to at least provide a much greater spectrum in terms of carcass stiffness and compounds. Senior Ducati personnel believe that a large part of their understeer could be solved by simply having a very different tire available. 

At the moment, Bridgestone looks reluctant to comply with all of the conditions being put to them by the Safety Commission. They would be forced to accept some of those conditions, Loris Capirossi told Motociclismo. The sticking point appears to be largely expanding the number of tires available, Bridgestone's chief coordinator of motorsport Thomas Scholz told the German website Speedweek.com. If another choice of compound were to be added, that would increase the number of tires Bridgestone would have transport to the track by some 300 per weekend. If two extra tire choices were added, that number would go to 600. Bridgestone would need an extra race truck to transport the tires to European circuits, and transport costs for overseas rounds would be massively increased. Bridgestone already pays over 20 million euros a season to supply a maximum of 22 riders each season with free tires. The Japanese firm is not keen for costs to be raised further.

Although other manufacturers are definitely interested in taking over the single tire contract for MotoGP, change is unlikely to come for next season. Dunlop representative Clinton Howe told Motociclismo that they would need 18 months to prepare to take over the MotoGP contract, and both Pirelli and Michelin would also need a similar preparation period. The contract with Bridgestone is likely to be extended for a single season to the end of 2015, before another tire manufacturer is likely to take over. That would mean that whoever takes on the MotoGP tire contract would start with a single set of rules, as the entire class is set to go to the spec hardware and software solution in 2016.

Paddock rumor currently makes Michelin the clear favorite to take over from Bridgestone, as Michelin has been testing 16.5 inch slick tires in Italy, at Vallelunga. Any switch away from Bridgestone will have a massive impact on the series, as the manufacturer who takes over will have no data on how modern MotoGP machines perform. Both Dunlop and Michelin have been absent from the series since 2008, and only Michelin was producing truly competitive tires at the time. However, a major reduction in performance is one of the things Dorna is believed to want from tire manufacturers. Though they are adamant that safety must not be compromised, having tires which predictably lose grip halfway through the race would create more interesting race, they believe, as riders would be forced to pursue tire conservation strategies. That has not been necessary with the Bridgestone tires, with riders setting their fastest laps often near the end of the race.

Any decision on tires will have to wait, however. Talks have only just started in earnest, and an agreement will take several months to reach.

Big changes look to be coming to MotoGP's spec tire system. Now in the sixth season of having a single official supplier, MotoGP is moving closer to seeing the number and variety of tires drastically expanded. With the contract with Bridgestone due to expire at the end of 2014, there is even a serious chance that a new manufacturer could take over from the Japanese tire firm.A report in the latest issue of the Spanish magazine Motociclismo (available via the Zinio platform), the magazine is reporting that Dorna is looking to change the way that the single tire supply works. Dorna representative Javier Alonso told Motociclismo that negotiations had been opened with several suppliers, including Michelin, Pirelli and Dunlop, as well as current supplier Bridgestone. Dorna had presented Bridgestone with a list of conditions drawn up by the Safety Commission, the liaison body in which the riders discuss safety issues with representatives of Dorna, hosted by safety officer Loris Capirossi.Though Alonso does not explicitly name the conditions, he does give Motociclismo some context behind their thinking. The idea is to expand the range of tires available at each race, as it has been all too common in recent history for riders to turn up at a particular track only to find that just one of the two compounds available will work. Though the Bridgestone tires have proven to be excellent in terms of both grip and durability, Alonso said, they had proven to be 'difficult for riders to understand sometimes.' The spec tire has also been blamed for creating problems for Ducati. The current tire forces manufacturers to pursue a particular direction in chassis design, which has favored Yamaha and Honda. The intention is not to force Bridgestone to design tires especially for each manufacturer, as Pirelli does in World Superbikes, but to at least provide a much greater spectrum in terms of carcass stiffness and compounds. Senior Ducati personnel believe that a large part of their understeer could be solved by simply having a very different tire available. 

Casey Stoner: I Miss Racing, But Not Enough To Return

Casey Stoner will not be returning to MotoGP any time soon. In an interview with the Italian magazine Vogue, Stoner said that he wanted to spend more time with his family and experience life outside the paddock.

There has been a constant stream of rumors that Stoner could return to MotoGP almost since the day the Australian hung up his helmet. They have grown in intensity at several points in time, most notably when Honda announced that Stoner would be working for HRC as a test rider in 2013. HRC Vice President Shuhei Nakamoto has made no secret that Honda would welcome the prodigal Australian back with open arms, and credible sources in Spain have reported that much work has been done to make a comeback possible, and to try to persuade Stoner to make a return.

News that Stoner was to attend the Austin round of MotoGP reignited a firestorm of further speculation that he could stage a comeback at some point in the future. That speculation was tempered by the fact that Stoner spent most of the weekend in Seattle, where he watched his friend Ryan Villopoto try to wrap up the 2014 Supercross title. Stoner made it to Austin on Sunday, where he paid a very low-key visit to MotoGP*, catching up with his former teammates.

If Stoner's brief trip to MotoGP was not enough to quash speculation on his return, an interview with the Italian edition of Vogue puts it beyond any doubt. Stoner made it very clear his priorities lie elsewhere. He wanted to spend more time with his family and experience life outside the paddock, he told the magazine. 'I miss some things, some sensations I felt when I was racing, but they're not enough to make me want to come back,' he said to Vogue. Among the things he missed were his team of mechanics, who followed him from Ducati to Honda. They were like his family to him, Stoner told Vogue.

If Stoner were to return, it might be in some form of managerial capacity, or helping young riders. Stoner has always pointed to the difficulties young Australian riders face when trying to break through internationally. The bodies governing Australian motorcycle racing were more of an obstacle than a help, Stoner said. He himself had been forced to leave Australia to pursue his career, moving to the UK to race where the legal age to start roadracing was 14. Stoner's point is borne out by Jack Miller: the current leader in the Moto3 standings also left Australia at a young age, and spent most of his youth racing in Spain and Germany, before entering Moto3.

* One thing Casey Stoner did while visiting Austin was sign some of Scott Jones' fabulous prints of the Australian riding. For more details on how to obtain signed prints, see Scott's website.

Casey Stoner will not be returning to MotoGP any time soon. In an interview with the Italian magazine Vogue, Stoner said that he wanted to spend more time with his family and experience life outside the paddock.There has been a constant stream of rumors that Stoner could return to MotoGP almost since the day the Australian hung up his helmet. They have grown in intensity at several points in time, most notably when Honda announced that Stoner would be working for HRC as a test rider in 2013. HRC Vice President Shuhei Nakamoto has made no secret that Honda would welcome the prodigal Australian back with open arms, and credible sources in Spain have reported that much work has been done to make a comeback possible, and to try to persuade Stoner to make a return.News that Stoner was to attend the Austin round of MotoGP reignited a firestorm of further speculation that he could stage a comeback at some point in the future. That speculation was tempered by the fact that Stoner spent most of the weekend in Seattle, where he watched his friend Ryan Villopoto try to wrap up the 2014 Supercross title. Stoner made it to Austin on Sunday, where he paid a very low-key visit to MotoGP*, catching up with his former teammates.

Kevin Schwantz Tests Suzuki MotoGP Bike, Randy De Puniet Matches Pace Of Open Bikes

Suzuki's MotoGP test team took advantage of the presence of the MotoGP paddock at Austin to plan a test directly after the Grand Prix of the Americas. Under the watchful eye of team manager Davide Brivio, the team planned to have test rider Randy De Puniet put in three days of testing at a circuit the team had not yet tested the bike at, in a bid to gather more data ahead of their return to the series in 2015.

Unfortunately for Suzuki, very heavy hail and thunderstorms made testing extremely difficult on Monday, leaving the track very dirty and much slower than it had been for Sunday's race. But testing resumed in earnest on Tuesday, with Randy De Puniet running through testing electronics and another back-to-back test of the two chassis options Suzuki has been working on. De Puniet racked up a total of 56 laps on Tuesday, eventually putting in a lap of 2'06.41. That is roughly on pace with the Open class Honda RCV1000R machines, though De Puniet faced much worse track conditions than the Open class machines due to the aftermath of the weather.

Also present at the test was Kevin Schwantz, the legendary American rider putting in 11 laps on the bike. Schwantz' best time was a 2'12.75, some way off the pace, but a respectable enough time for a fifty-year-old with only a few laps to get up to speed. Schwantz was also riding the Yoshimura Suzuki GSX-R1000, preparing for the Suzuka 8 Hour race in July.

In a separate press release, Suzuki also issued a video containing questions put to Davide Brivio over the team's test schedule. The video has been overtaken by events, however, as the video was shot at the Sepang tests, before the last-minute rule changes which saw factories which did not win a race in 2013 handed extra concessions. 

Testing concludes on Wednesday. Below is the press release issued after testing on Tuesday:


SCHWANTZ JOINS SUZUKI MOTOGP AT AUSTIN TEST

Team Suzuki Press Office – April 16.

Suzuki’s former World 500cc GP Champion Kevin Schwantz joined the Suzuki MotoGP Test Team for its test at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas this week.

The 1993 World Champion, who last raced a MotoGP machine in 2006, completed 11 laps of the 5,513m circuit with a best lap-time of 2’12.75.

Schwantz, who also tested the Yoshimura Suzuki Superbike team’s GSX-R1000s, said: “I went on the MotoGP machine after riding the GSX-R1000 Superbike and it felt like going from a 500cc to a 250cc bike; the MotoGP machine is so small and compact! The bike turns, accelerates, goes fast; it does everything and I had fun and really enjoyed it.

“With this bike you have power and braking so you brake and accelerate and the bike does all the rest. I think Suzuki should race now - the sooner the better! You can test a lot but in the race you really understand.

“After having ridden the MotoGP machine, I now appreciate much-more the GSX-R and I want to continue to work on that now to prepare for my race at Suzuka in July. So tomorrow I will only ride the GSX-R.”

With track and air temperatures much cooler than the weekend’s MotoGP second round – and with Monday’s opening day hit by heavy rain and dirty track conditions – Suzuki MotoGP Test rider Randy De Puniet completed 56 laps with a best lap-time of 2’06.41. The team spent a lot of time in the morning session testing new chassis settings and also adjusting the gearbox for the team’s first test on this new-for-them circuit.

Said De Puniet: “This was a new track for Suzuki but also I have not ridden the bike since February. We spend some time changing the settings and the gearbox ratios, then we continued to compare two different frames and we found again that the best one here was the one we choose in Sepang. And we confirmed it again that this is more-stable in the corner entry. In the afternoon we tested different electronic maps.

It has been not bad as first day here and I’m confident we can improve tomorrow. Hopefully the track will be cleaner.”

Suzuki MotoGP Test Team Manager Davide Brivio said: “A positive day on a completely new circuit for us. One of the main targets is to continue the development of the new electronics and also to collect useful information on this track for next year when we will be racing.

“We have done that today but also we could work on bike settings and chassis comparison. The lap-time is not bad for the first day and we are looking forward to improving tomorrow hoping that the temperature can go up a bit and the track will be cleaner.

“It was also very emotional to have Kevin Schwantz - everybody’s hero - riding our bike here. He was quite fast considering the conditions, so we’d like to thank Kevin for this gift!”


Davide Brivio's testing progress report:

Suzuki's MotoGP test team took advantage of the presence of the MotoGP paddock at Austin to plan a test directly after the Grand Prix of the Americas. Under the watchful eye of team manager Davide Brivio, the team planned to have test rider Randy De Puniet put in three days of testing at a circuit the team had not yet tested the bike at, in a bid to gather more data ahead of their return to the series in 2015.Unfortunately for Suzuki, very heavy hail and thunderstorms made testing extremely difficult on Monday, leaving the track very dirty and much slower than it had been for Sunday's race. But testing resumed in earnest on Tuesday, with Randy De Puniet running through testing electronics and another back-to-back test of the two chassis options Suzuki has been working on. De Puniet racked up a total of 56 laps on Tuesday, eventually putting in a lap of 2'06.41. That is roughly on pace with the Open class Honda RCV1000R machines, though De Puniet faced much worse track conditions than the Open class machines due to the aftermath of the weather.

MSMA Agree To Freeze Electronic Development Ahead Of 2016 Switchover

With the MotoGP series due to switch over to standard software for the spec Magneti Marelli ECU in 2016, there comes a point at which it makes no sense for the factories to continue developing their own electronics. There is, after all, little point in spending money on software which will be discarded all the way to the last race of 2015, especially as the factories will need to start work on the shared electronics package for 2016 and beyond.

GPOne.com is reporting that the factories have finally agreed a date for an electronics freeze to commence. From the 2015 Assen round of MotoGP, all development of factory software will be frozen, Ducati, Honda and Yamaha racing the rest of the 2015 season with the software they have developed up until that point. Ducati had initially opposed the software freeze, GPOne.com reports, but finally settled for the Assen date.

From that point on, the factories in the MSMA will concentrate their attention on the collaborative effort to develop the standard software to be used by all of the MotoGP bikes from 2016 onwards. Development is to be done via a common portal under the control of Dorna, with all of the factories contributing functionality and code for everyone to review and use.

The one detail missing from the electronics freeze is how that will be enforced, as GPOne.com points out. It is hard to see how a development freeze is to be enforced without each of the factories handing over their software to Dorna, but that seems like an inconceivable option for the factories.

With the MotoGP series due to switch over to standard software for the spec Magneti Marelli ECU in 2016, there comes a point at which it makes no sense for the factories to continue developing their own electronics. There is, after all, little point in spending money on software which will be discarded all the way to the last race of 2015, especially as the factories will need to start work on the shared electronics package for 2016 and beyond.GPOne.com is reporting that the factories have finally agreed a date for an electronics freeze to commence. From the 2015 Assen round of MotoGP, all development of factory software will be frozen, Ducati, Honda and Yamaha racing the rest of the 2015 season with the software they have developed up until that point. Ducati had initially opposed the software freeze, GPOne.com reports, but finally settled for the Assen date.

Scott Jones In Austin - Visions Of Texas, Part 2


The Ducati's getting closer. Could Dovizioso win a race this year?


Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks?


Everything's bigger in Texas. Even the kerbs.


Body language


Up one week, down the next. There is still work to be done for Alvaro Bautista


Taking no prisoners


Bowing out


Let's roll


Stefan Bradl stepped it up a notch in Texas


Maniac Joe is finding his feet. So you better beware


Factory life is tough, but Crutchlow's adapting


Rabat, ready to rock


Fastest proddie Honda. Redding is impressing on his debut


Red McComb looked at a sketch of the tower on paper, and knew COTA had to have it


Bradley Smith. Taking care of business in Texas


If you'd like to have desktop-sized versions of Scott's fantastic photos, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. If you'd like a print of one of the shots you see on the site, then send Scott an email and he'll be happy to help.

The Ducati's getting closer. Could Dovizioso win a race this year? Who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks? Everything's bigger in Texas. Even the kerbs.

Scott Jones In Austin - Visions Of Texas, Part 1


Goodbye, and thanks for everything


Sideways. Just because


Anything he can do, I can do better


In the eye of the storm


Benvenuto a Texas, Mattia!


Second race, and fastest production Honda. Not bad for a new boy, Scott Redding


Seamless gearbox inside


The Ducati train


Wayne Rainey, living legend


Rossi's boys. Romano Fenati on the Team Sky VR46 KTM


One fast German


Not as fast here as at Qatar, but Aleix Espargaro didn't test here beforehand


Dreaming of pneumatic valves


Americans. MotoGP and World Superbikes need more of them


Mnemonic: #68 is 2013, #29 is 2014


If you'd like to have desktop-sized versions of Scott's fantastic photos, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. If you'd like a print of one of the shots you see on the site, then send Scott an email and he'll be happy to help.

Goodbye, and thanks for everything Sideways. Just because Anything he can do, I can do better

GTranslate