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Moto2 And Moto3 Massively Oversubscribed For 2015

The popularity of Moto2 and Moto3 continues unabated, both among fans and among racing teams. Silverstone was the deadline for teams to submit their requests to be considered for grid slots in the two support classes for MotoGP in 2015, and the entries massively outnumbered the available spaces on the grid.

There were entries for 47 riders in Moto3, and 45 in Moto2, all competing for the 32 available slots in each class. The selection committee of IRTA, who decide who will be given the places on the grid, then selected a total of 33 teams who will be awarded grid slots. Those teams now have until Aragon to submit a list of the riders they will have under contract for 2015, and the bikes they intend to race next season. They will also have to pay a deposit to ensure their entry for next season.

The Aragon deadline will trigger an early round of negotiation for 2015 in the junior classes, which have traditionally not signed riders until very late on in the process. With teams required to submit a list of both riders and bikes, they will have to secure contracts, at least provisionally, with riders and with machinery manufacturers. The rider list submitted will not necessarily be the final 2015 line up for both classes, but it will be very close.

The Aragon deadline for bikes is a new rule for 2015, instituted after the delay in Honda announcing its Moto3 plans last year. HRC knew it would be producing a much more competitive, and consequently much more expensive version of its Moto3 bike for this season, and held off in the hope that teams would switch to KTM, Kalex or Mahindra. Honda knew it would have to subsidize its Moto3 entries, and wanted to limit its costs. To avoid a similar situation, and ensure that all teams would have an equal chance to secure use of the cost-capped Moto3 bikes of their choice, IRTA instituted the deadline at Aragon.

Below is the press release from the FIM on the entry list:


FIM Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix

Meeting of the Selection Committee – Silverstone (GBR), 30 August

Any team wishing to participate in the Moto3 or Moto2 classes of the FIM MotoGP World Championship in 2015 was required to submit an application to IRTA by the deadline of Thursday 28 August.

On Saturday 30 August the Selection Committee charged with reviewing applications convened at Silverstone.

There were valid applications considered from teams representing 47 riders in the Moto3 class and 45 riders in the Moto2 class. The target entry for both classes is 32 riders.

The Selection Committee agreed to provisionally confirm the participation of 33 teams who, between them, can provide the riders to meet the targeted entry. These teams now have until the deadline of Friday 26 September at the Aragon GP to confirm the machines they will use, the final riders they will contract and to pay a security deposit to guarantee their eventual participation.

A second selection meeting will then take place during the Aragon GP to review the final entry details and to confirm those teams that will be offered Participation Agreements for 2015. A list of accepted teams will then be published.

The popularity of Moto2 and Moto3 continues unabated, both among fans and among racing teams. Silverstone was the deadline for teams to submit their requests to be considered for grid slots in the two support classes for MotoGP in 2015, and the entries massively outnumbered the available spaces on the grid.There were entries for 47 riders in Moto3, and 45 in Moto2, all competing for the 32 available slots in each class. The selection committee of IRTA, who decide who will be given the places on the grid, then selected a total of 33 teams who will be awarded grid slots. Those teams now have until Aragon to submit a list of the riders they will have under contract for 2015, and the bikes they intend to race next season. They will also have to pay a deposit to ensure their entry for next season.The Aragon deadline will trigger an early round of negotiation for 2015 in the junior classes, which have traditionally not signed riders until very late on in the process. With teams required to submit a list of both riders and bikes, they will have to secure contracts, at least provisionally, with riders and with machinery manufacturers. The rider list submitted will not necessarily be the final 2015 line up for both classes, but it will be very close.

Scott Jones At Silverstone: Saturday Photos From A Windswept Airfield


The Doctor's Surgery


If this MotoGP thing doesn't work out, there's always the circus


That should buff right out. Probably


True Brit: Redding runs with a Union Jack livery


Knee up, elbow down is the new knee down


Andrea Iannone: the future of Ducati?


Johann Zarco finally brought some cheer to Caterham, by bagging his first pole for the team


That'll probably buff out as well


All change at the back


Aleix Espargaro is officially off the market


Homework never ends when you're in MotoGP


Remember, MotoGP fans: don't drink beer and ride your motorcycle!


Unless it's alcohol free, of course ...


If you'd like to have desktop-sized versions of Scott's fantastic photos, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. If you'd like a print of one of the shots you see on the site, then send Scott an email and he'll be happy to help.

The Doctor's Surgery If this MotoGP thing doesn't work out, there's always the circus That should buff right out. Probably

Scott Jones At Silverstone: Friday Photos From A Windswept Airfield


The old man returns: Rossi's revival continues through 2014


Another year makes a big difference. Andrea Dovizioso has got the Ducati a lot closer to the pointy end


How to get a Honda to turn: on the front wheel


Scott Redding, home boy


A well-used hard tire


Best Yamaha on Friday, Bradley Smith


Lorenzo's garage saw a lot of discussion. The Spaniard is struggling with new rear tire once again


Aoyama, Camier, Petrucci. Leon Camier learning his way around the Open bike freight train


A penny for your thoughts, Cal?


Aleix Espargaro's pace has flagged in the second half of the season. Getting ready for a grand finale?


Polyccio!


Fastest ant on the planet. Fastest human, too.


If you'd like to have desktop-sized versions of Scott's fantastic photos, you can become a site supporter and take out a subscription. If you'd like a print of one of the shots you see on the site, then send Scott an email and he'll be happy to help.

The old man returns: Rossi's revival continues through 2014 Another year makes a big difference. Andrea Dovizioso has got the Ducati a lot closer to the pointy end How to get a Honda to turn: on the front wheel

No Points Compensation For Loss Of South African World Superbike Round - Three Rounds Left In 2014 Championship

The loss of the South African round of World Superbikes, when the safety improvements to the Welkom circuit could not be completed in time for homologation, meant that the WSBK calendar had lost two rounds from its 2014 calendar, with both South Africa and the Moscow Raceway event having been scrapped. Two rounds meant the loss of two World Supersport races and four World Superbike races, a total of 50 points for WSS and 100 points for WSBK.

The loss of those points left both championships much closer to being decided. Tom Sykes leads the World Superbike championship by 44 points with 150 points stil at stake, while Michael van der Mark is even closer to the World Supersport championship, leading Jules Cluzel by 53 points with just 75 points left. The teams, but most especially the riders, felt that they had had a chance to try to reopen the championship races taken away from them.

Dorna, the teams, the manufacturers and the FIM tried to find a solution to this quandary. Various proposals were made, including adding an extra round at another track, adding extra races on the existing three weekends left, and scoring double points at one of the last rounds. Finding a track willing and able to host a round of World Superbikes at very late notice was a non-runner from the start, leaving only an extra race or extra points.

Today, the Superbike Commission, WSBK's governing body, announced that the teams, factories and Dorna had failed to come to an agreement over proposals to compensate for points. The teams and manufacturers rejected the proposal from Dorna to hold an extra race at the final round of WSBK in Qatar. No agreement could be arrived at to compensate in other ways, such as extra points.

This means that the final three rounds of World Superbike will be run as projected. WSBK will visit Jerez on 7th September, Magny-Cours on 5th October, with the final round of the series being held under the floodlights at the Losail circuit in Qatar, on 2nd November.

How many rounds there will be in 2015 remains to be seen. The 2014 season was largely dictated by contracts signed with World Superbikes' previous owners, the Flammini brothers and InFront Motor Sports. 2015 will be the first year in which many of the contracts will fall free for Dorna to negotiate themselves. A provisional calendar is not expected until much later this year.

The loss of the South African round of World Superbikes, when the safety improvements to the Welkom circuit could not be completed in time for homologation, meant that the WSBK calendar had lost two rounds from its 2014 calendar, with both South Africa and the Moscow Raceway event having been scrapped. Two rounds meant the loss of two World Supersport races and four World Superbike races, a total of 50 points for WSS and 100 points for WSBK.The loss of those points left both championships much closer to being decided. Tom Sykes leads the World Superbike championship by 44 points with 150 points stil at stake, while Michael van der Mark is even closer to the World Supersport championship, leading Jules Cluzel by 53 points with just 75 points left. The teams, but most especially the riders, felt that they had had a chance to try to reopen the championship races taken away from them.Dorna, the teams, the manufacturers and the FIM tried to find a solution to this quandary. Various proposals were made, including adding an extra round at another track, adding extra races on the existing three weekends left, and scoring double points at one of the last rounds. Finding a track willing and able to host a round of World Superbikes at very late notice was a non-runner from the start, leaving only an extra race or extra points.

Dakota Mamola To Make Moto2 Debut At Silverstone

Another hallowed name is to make a return to the Grand Prix paddock. At Silverstone, Dakota Mamola, son of famed former 500 GP winner Randy Mamola, is to replace Nico Terol. Terol is absent due to illness, the Spaniard suffering a mystery metabolic disorder which is causing extreme muscle fatigue. While Terol undergoes treatment, Mamola will take his place, with Terol hoping to make a return at Misano, two weeks after Silverstone.

Mamola has been racing in the Spanish CEV Moto2 championship with the GRT racing team. The 19-year-old is currently in 11th place, having scored 18 points at two races at the Motorland Aragon circuit. In 2013, Mamola raced in the European 600 Superstock championship, ending in 19th place with 28 points. The youngster has been receiving technical support from Aspar in the CEV, so he is a natural choice to replace Terol.

The interesting question is under what nationality Dakota Mamola will be entered. The youngster is racing in the CEV under a Belgian license, as his mother is Belgian, and organizing the paperwork to compete in the CEV is easier with a European license. When Mamola raced in the European Superstock license, he raced with a Spanish license, having done most of his racing in Spain. Given Randy Mamola's fame throughout the world as an American racer, doubtless Dorna would like to have Randy's son Dakota racing on his American passport. Whether this can be arranged in time for Silverstone remains to be seen.

Below is the press release from the Aspar team announcing Mamola's ride:


Dakota Mamola to replace Nico Terol at Silverstone

After making his CEV debut earlier this season, the American-Belgian youngster is now preparing for his Grand Prix debut in place of Nico Terol

Earlier this season, on the 22nd May to be precise, the Aspar Team announced that they would provide the technical support for Dakota Mamola to make his debut in the Spanish Championship with the GRT Racing Team. Now, after just three rounds competing at national level, the American-Belgian rider is set to make his World Championship debut with the MAPFRE Aspar Team in place of Nico Terol, who is recovering from muscle fatigue issues that have dogged him all season.

Mamola, son of four-time 500cc World Championship runner-up Randy, will contest his maiden Grand Prix in MAPFRE Aspar Team colours in this weekend's Moto2 race at Silverstone, with Terol hoping to be fit to return to action for the following round at Misano. It is a huge opportunity and challenge for Dakota, who will be making the step up to World Championship level just months after taking his bow on the national stage.

Jorge Martínez ‘Aspar’: “We are delighted to offer another opportunity to Dakota Mamola. At the end of May we decided to support him in the CEV and he has shown the potential that he possesses as a rider. He is progressing quickly and we are sure he will continue to do so. He can go out and enjoy Silverstone because he is not under any pressure. The idea is that he continues to build his confidence on the Moto2 bike in preparation for the final few rounds of the Spanish Championship. Whilst we are delighted to have Dakota with us in Silverstone, we want to make it clear that the MAPFRE Aspar Team's official rider is Nico Terol, who is currently in a process of recovery, and we hope that process is swift so that he can return to racing as soon as possible.”

Dakota Mamola: “First of all I would like to wish Nico a swift recovery. Thanks to him and the MAPFRE Aspar Team I have this incredible opportunity and I would also like to thank the GRT team for their support in the CEV. To compete in the World Championship is a dream come true, we didn't expect it to happen this year but this is the way it's worked out. It is going to be a completely new experience for me and it will be a good opportunity for me to learn about Moto2. It will also be a chance to build my confidence ahead of the next round of the Spanish Championship at Navarra. I am really happy, it's a great honour that the MAPFRE Aspar Team have turned to me as Nico's replacement for this race. I know that they will help me a lot, I am not under any pressure and the objective is to enjoy the experience.”

Another hallowed name is to make a return to the Grand Prix paddock. At Silverstone, Dakota Mamola, son of famed former 500 GP winner Randy Mamola, is to replace Nico Terol. Terol is absent due to illness, the Spaniard suffering a mystery metabolic disorder which is causing extreme muscle fatigue. While Terol undergoes treatment, Mamola will take his place, with Terol hoping to make a return at Misano, two weeks after Silverstone.Mamola has been racing in the Spanish CEV Moto2 championship with the GRT racing team. The 19-year-old is currently in 11th place, having scored 18 points at two races at the Motorland Aragon circuit. In 2013, Mamola raced in the European 600 Superstock championship, ending in 19th place with 28 points. The youngster has been receiving technical support from Aspar in the CEV, so he is a natural choice to replace Terol.

50-Year-Old Jeremy McWilliams To Race Brough Superior In Moto2 At Silverstone

Jeremy McWilliams is to make a return to Grand Prix racing at the ripe old age of 50. The Northern Irish racer is to ride the Brough Superior Moto2 machine at Silverstone as a wildcard.

It will be McWilliams' first Grand Prix since 2007, when he rode the ill-fated Ilmor, which was withdrawn after just one race due to a failure to raise sponsorship. Since then, McWilliams has been active in both the US and Ireland, racing in the XR1200 championship which serves as a support race to the AMA, and racing on the roads in Northern Ireland. Before leaving Grand Prix racing, McWilliams had a long career in both the 250cc and MotoGP classes. His most memorable rides were with the QUB TSR-Honda in 250s, aboard the Aprilia 500cc twin at the start of the century, and riding the Proton KR bike in MotoGP. McWilliams won the 250cc race at Assen in 2001 aboard the Aprilia.

The Brough Superior McWilliams is to ride has been discussed here before. The bike is a carbon monocoque frame and carbon fiber swingarm, and uses a wishbone front fork, not unlike the Telelever set up to be found on some BMW road bikes. The bike has been designed and built by Paul Taylor of TaylorMade Racing, and will be backed by British insurance firm Bennett's. The Brough Superior will be the second bike to feature an unconventional front suspension set up, the other being the Transfiormers bike being raced by Lucas Mahias in the Promoto Sport team. That bike features a Hossack-style Fior front end, ironically the other style of front end used on BMW road bikes, but marketed as a Duolever.

Jeremy McWilliams is to make a return to Grand Prix racing at the ripe old age of 50. The Northern Irish racer is to ride the Brough Superior Moto2 machine at Silverstone as a wildcard.It will be McWilliams' first Grand Prix since 2007, when he rode the ill-fated Ilmor, which was withdrawn after just one race due to a failure to raise sponsorship. Since then, McWilliams has been active in both the US and Ireland, racing in the XR1200 championship which serves as a support race to the AMA, and racing on the roads in Northern Ireland. Before leaving Grand Prix racing, McWilliams had a long career in both the 250cc and MotoGP classes. His most memorable rides were with the QUB TSR-Honda in 250s, aboard the Aprilia 500cc twin at the start of the century, and riding the Proton KR bike in MotoGP. McWilliams won the 250cc race at Assen in 2001 aboard the Aprilia.

Tom Sykes Signs On For Two More Years In World Superbikes With Kawasaki

Tom Sykes will be staying on with Kawasaki for two more seasons. Kawasaki today announced that the Yorkshireman has signed a contract to remain with the Japanese factory in World Superbikes for the 2015 and 2016 seasons. 

The announcement does not come as a surprise. Sykes has known great success with Kawasaki since leaving Yamaha after his first year in World Superbikes. All of Sykes' wins in the class have come aboard a green machine, and the Yorkshireman won his first World Superbike title with Kawasaki last year. Currently leading the 2014 championship by 44 points, his second successive title is within grasp. The Kawasaki ZX-10R remains a highly competitve package, and Sykes is a good fit inside the team.

Unlike many of his fellow WSBK riders, Sykes was never in the frame for a MotoGP ride. Sykes had shown little interest in making the jump to MotoGP, unless he could be on top-flight machinery. With all of the factory bikes tied up, and the satellite slots largely spoken for, there was little room for Sykes, even if he had been interested in a move. Instead, Sykes preferred to stay on in World Superbikes, and chase more WSBK titles.

Below is the press release issued by Kawasaki on the Sykes signing:


Tom Sykes To Remain With KRT For Two More Years

Reigning World Champion Tom Sykes has recently signed an agreement to continue as an official Kawasaki Superbike World Championship rider for two more years, covering the 2015 and 2016 seasons.

Yorkshireman Sykes (29) won the title with Kawasaki in 2013 and is currently in a commanding 44-point lead in the 2014 championship as Kawasaki continues its ‘Ninja 30’ anniversary celebrations throughout the year. Having competed on official Kawasaki machinery since the 2010 season Tom has become ‘Mr Kawasaki’ in the eyes of not only his many fans but also the Kawasaki family and the world at large.

Sykes has won all of his 22 career WSBK race victories to date with Kawasaki and is the most successful rider in Superpole qualifying in the modern era, with 23 Superpole wins - again all on Ninja ZX-10R machines. In 151 race starts in WSB Sykes has taken 46 podiums and 21 fastest laps.

The 2015 season and beyond will present a new challenge for all involved in the KRT effort, as the technical regulations will change in some significant ways, but Sykes and Kawasaki are confident that the class-leading Ninja ZX-10R will be a competitive package in any form of production-derived racing.

Tom Sykes: “I am very excited to re-sign and the decision was quite easy. I am looking forward to another two years with a great manufacturer. Kawasaki and I already have quite a good history. This is my fifth year as a rider with the brand, my fourth year with the current model of the Ninja ZX-10R, so for me it was an easy decision to continue.

I have put so much work into the bike I would not want to give my baby to someone else! We have been in discussion for a while but we have had really good success in recent years and continuing our relationship gives us an opportunity to take the story forward again. I sat at home and went through the pros and cons, like you do with a lot of things in life, and the pros for re-signing were almost endless.

I am very happy because Kawasaki and I have a high level of mutual respect and trust. The team is doing a great job so it is great to have two more years of continuity. I am relaxed now I know that I am moving on again with a great brand and a great team around me. I feel proud to have been involved in helping the development direction of the Ninja, so I am very happy to be staying where I am.”

Steve Guttridge, Racing Manager Kawasaki Motors Europe: “I'm so pleased that we have come to an agreement with Tom to continue the great job that he has been making in World Superbike on our Ninja ZX-10R over the past few seasons. He's our World Champion and a great ambassador for our brand too. At this moment we are very committed to continuing our dominance in Superbike racing and Tom is the man to help Kawasaki do just that."

Guim Roda, Team Manager Kawasaki Racing Team: “It is very good that Kawasaki and Tom have signed again for 2015 and 2016 as it is a very good point to work towards the new rules coming in 2015, and make another strong season in 2016. Tom knows the bike and team very well and I can guarantee he has still not arrived at the limit of his full potential. This is a very good opportunity to continue with great stability so we can improve the package and be even stronger next year.

The show will go on! I’m sure this is very good news for all Kawasaki fans and we want to say thanks for all the support shown to the KRT team and riders. I hope now we can enjoy a nice holiday during the current summer break and that Tom rests enough to remain very strong in the last part of the season.”

Tom Sykes will be staying on with Kawasaki for two more seasons. Kawasaki today announced that the Yorkshireman has signed a contract to remain with the Japanese factory in World Superbikes for the 2015 and 2016 seasons. The announcement does not come as a surprise. Sykes has known great success with Kawasaki since leaving Yamaha after his first year in World Superbikes. All of Sykes' wins in the class have come aboard a green machine, and the Yorkshireman won his first World Superbike title with Kawasaki last year. Currently leading the 2014 championship by 44 points, his second successive title is within grasp. The Kawasaki ZX-10R remains a highly competitve package, and Sykes is a good fit inside the team.Unlike many of his fellow WSBK riders, Sykes was never in the frame for a MotoGP ride. Sykes had shown little interest in making the jump to MotoGP, unless he could be on top-flight machinery. With all of the factory bikes tied up, and the satellite slots largely spoken for, there was little room for Sykes, even if he had been interested in a move. Instead, Sykes preferred to stay on in World Superbikes, and chase more WSBK titles.Below is the press release issued by Kawasaki on the Sykes signing:Tom Sykes To Remain With KRT For Two More Years

Health Issues Force Nico Terol To Sit Out Silverstone

Nico Terol has decided to sit out the Silverstone round of Moto2. After enduring a dismal year with a mystery ailment, Terol has been forced to withdraw and focus on locating the source of his problems, so that he can return to racing in full health.

Terol was expected to challenge for the title in 2014, after scoring three wins and one podium last season with the Mapfre Aspar team. But there had been warning signs of something amiss previously. In the middle of last year, Terol was suspected of suffering late onset lactose intolerance, exactly the same condition that affected Casey Stoner during the 2009 season. Treatment for that appears not to have had the desired effect, as Terol has suffered all this year with extreme fatigue and elevated testosterone levels.

The issue has now reached the point where Terol can no longer be competitive in his current condition. Terol and the Mapfre Aspar team have decided that the Spaniard should sit out Silverstone while undergoing a battery of tests to locate the source of the problem. Though the press release issued by the team speaks solely of Silverstone, it is not completely certain Terol will be back at Misano.

Below is the press release issued by the Aspar team:


Nico Terol to miss British Grand Prix

MAPFRE Aspar rider to take time out to recover from physical issues that have dogged him all season

MAPFRE Aspar rider Nico Terol ended last season in good form, with three victories and a podium, despite some physical problems arising from premature muscle fatigue. This year Nico started out strongly during winter testing but once the season started the muscle fatigue returned and with eleven races already gone in the championship he has been advised by doctors to take a break from racing so that he can be properly examined again and treated.

The decision to follow the doctors' advice means that Nico will definitely miss the next round of the season, the British Grand Prix at Silverstone. Since he started with these symptoms Nico has been in the hands of Dr. Ángel Charte, head of the Internal Medicine team at the Instituto Universitario Dexeus and also part of the rapid response medical team at the MotoGP events. Terol has already undergone a host of examinations and over the next few days he will be subjected to an exhaustive run of tests to try and detect the cause of his muscle fatigue.

The decision to take this break in the middle of the season has been taken jointly by the MAPFRE Aspar Team and Nico Terol. Nico has the full support of the team during the time he needs to make a full recuperation.

Jorge Martínez ‘Aspar’: “It has been hard to take this decision alongside Nico and those closest to him but we have to accept that at the moment he is not 100% fit and the best thing for him is to recover. As a rider myself it hurts me to see my riders, and people that I have affection for, suffering with physical problems. Even though he is going through a tough period Nico is a fighter and he will work hard to recover as soon as possible. He has the full backing of everybody at the MAPFRE Aspar Team, and we just want to wish him well with his recovery.”

Nico Terol: “After eleven tough races because of my health I am going to take some time off to analyse every detail and find the origin of this physical problem so that we can tackle it. I had a few episodes last season but they were only occasional and I was able to recover, even winning some races. The doctors think that with some quiet time away from racing we can find the root of the problem. I have spoken with Jorge and I want to thank him for his understanding at this time. I'm sad for my team, my sponsors and my supporters and I'm also upset because we had high expectations for this season. After winning races last year we thought we would be very competitive this time around.”

Nico Terol has decided to sit out the Silverstone round of Moto2. After enduring a dismal year with a mystery ailment, Terol has been forced to withdraw and focus on locating the source of his problems, so that he can return to racing in full health.Terol was expected to challenge for the title in 2014, after scoring three wins and one podium last season with the Mapfre Aspar team. But there had been warning signs of something amiss previously. In the middle of last year, Terol was suspected of suffering late onset lactose intolerance, exactly the same condition that affected Casey Stoner during the 2009 season. Treatment for that appears not to have had the desired effect, as Terol has suffered all this year with extreme fatigue and elevated testosterone levels.The issue has now reached the point where Terol can no longer be competitive in his current condition. Terol and the Mapfre Aspar team have decided that the Spaniard should sit out Silverstone while undergoing a battery of tests to locate the source of the problem. Though the press release issued by the team speaks solely of Silverstone, it is not completely certain Terol will be back at Misano.Below is the press release issued by the Aspar team:Nico Terol to miss British Grand Prix

GPC Introduces The Quartararo Rule - Minimum Age Limit Scrapped For CEV Moto3 Winner

The minimum age limit for the Moto3 class is to dropped for the winner of the Spanish CEV Moto3 championship. In a meeting at Brno, the Grand Prix Commission approved a proposal for the winner of the CEV Moto3 to be allowed to compete in the Moto3 world championship the season after winning the CEV. 

The rule change will mean that Fabio Quartararo, the young Frenchman currently leading the CEV Moto3, will be allowed to start in Moto3 in 2015. The Frenchman is currently 15, and does not turn 16 until 20th April. If this rule had not been changed, then Quartararo would have been forced to miss the first two races of the 2015 season. 

The official justification for the rule change is that the CEV is now a championship run under the auspices of the FIM, and therefore has a higher status than a normal national championship. The level in that championship is clearly high, as demonstrated by the results of Jorge Navarro in Moto3, drafted in to replace Livio Loi.

The suspicion remains in the paddock that this was a rule change made at the behest of certain Spanish teams. Quartararo currently rides for Emilio Alzamora's Estrella Galicia Junior team alongside Maria Herrera. It is believed that Alzamora plans to move both riders up to Grand Prix for 2015, when Alex Marquez and Alex Rins move on to Moto2. Having Quartararo miss the first two opening rounds would have put the team in a difficult situation.

The age change was not the only rule change made by the Grand Prix Commission. A change was also made to the starting grid procedure, forcing riders to switch off their engines and be pushed to their grid positions. That rule is aimed at reducing the speeds at which riders cut through what is often a very busy grid, with team members, photographers, journalists and guests all wandering around the grid.

A number of changes to the Moto3 technical regulations were also made, all of them pertaining to costs. The aim of the changes is in closing some of the loopholes by which manufacturers have been circumventing the price caps on parts. Whether this will be successful remains to be seen.

The press release from the FIM appears below:


FIM Road Racing World Championship Grand Prix
Decision of the Grand Prix Commission

The Grand Prix Commission, composed of Messrs. Carmelo Ezpeleta (Dorna, Chairman), Ignacio Verneda (FIM Executive Director, Sport), Herve Poncharal (IRTA) and Takanao Tsubouchi (MSMA) in the presence of Javier Alonso (Dorna) and Mike Trimby (IRTA, Secretary of the meeting), in a meeting held on 16th. August 2014 in Brno, made the following decisions:

Sporting Regulations

Effective 2015

Age Limits in the Moto3 Class

The winner of the FIM CEV Moto3 Championship is permitted to compete in the Moto3 class of MotoGP in the following season, even if the rider had not reached the minimum age for the class. (Currently 16 years).

Start Grid Procedure – All Classes

To reduce the risk of accidents and possible injuries to workers and guests on the starting grids the following regulation was approved.

At the completion of his sighting laps the rider must stop at the rear of the grid and cut his engine. There are then two options available:

  1. The rider may dismount and his machine may then be pushed at a walking pace by his mechanic to his grid position where the rider may re-join and mount his machine, or
  2. The rider may remain seated on the machine and, guided by another person, he and the machine may then be pushed at walking place to his grid position.

Technical Regulations

Moto3 Class - Effective 2015

Following agreement by the manufacturers involved, additional regulations, mainly concerning the supply and costs of material for this class, were approved. Main points include:

GENERAL

The minimum numbers of machines that each manufacturer is required to supply, if requested, is reduced to 12. (Based on one machine per contracted rider).

ENGINE AND GEARBOX

Throttle Bodies

Two throttle bodies must be included in the engine package which comprises six engines. Extra throttle bodies will be charged for.

Manufacturers may choose to make a maximum of one upgrade to throttle bodies during the season. If an upgrade is produced then one throttle body must be supplied at no cost to each contracted rider at the same time. Extra, upgraded throttle bodies will be charged for.

Gearbox

Contracted riders are permitted to purchase a maximum of six complete gearboxes in each season at the contracted price of €1,500 each. Additional gearboxes will be charged for at the normal list price.

Upgrades to gearboxes or gearbox components are permitted only once during the season and must be available to all contracted riders at the same time.

If the manufacturer introduces an upgraded complete gearbox during the season then the contracted riders are then permitted to purchase a maximum of eight complete gearboxes in each season at the contracted price of €1,500 each. Additional gearboxes will be charged for at the normal list price.

In the case that the upgrade consists of one or more components rather than the whole gearbox then the parts will be charged for at the normal list prices.

ROLLING CHASSIS

Homologation of Complete Rolling Chassis

Each Manufacturer is permitted to homologate only one version of its own chassis and only one version of any third party brand of chassis they wish to make available. (It was already agreed that teams can homlogate chassis used in 2014 to be used in 2015)

Once a Manufacturer has submitted a rolling chassis price list for homologation it is not permitted to change the Supplier/Brand of any of its parts.

Sensors

Each Manufacturer manufacture is required to define which sensors they will supply with their Machine. Changing of Manufacturer/ brand of sensors, either by the Manufacture or the rider, is not permitted.

Setting Parts

Each Manufacturer may define a list of chassis setting parts. The rolling chassis provided within the maximum price will include one of each of the setting parts.

Manufacturers may also produce different versions of each setting part providing that the material and basic structure/dimensions are the same. These variants of the original setting parts may be supplied to contracted riders at normal list prices.

The only setting parts that may be supplied are:

  • Handle bar clamps
  • Foot peg plates
  • Seat pads
  • Headstock insert
  • Pivots
  • Linkages
  • Triple Clamps
  • Windscreen
  • Wheel Sprockets

Suspension

All suspension components must be included within the maximum homologated chassis package price.

Internal setting parts are not controlled and are not subject to homologation. Internal setting parts may be may be modified or replaced at any time by the team or suspension manufacturer.

A regularly updated version of the FIM Grand Prix Regulations which contains the detailed text of the regulation changes may be viewed shortly on:

http://www.fim-live.com/en/sport/official-documents-ccr/codes-and-regula...

The minimum age limit for the Moto3 class is to dropped for the winner of the Spanish CEV Moto3 championship. In a meeting at Brno, the Grand Prix Commission approved a proposal for the winner of the CEV Moto3 to be allowed to compete in the Moto3 world championship the season after winning the CEV. The rule change will mean that Fabio Quartararo, the young Frenchman currently leading the CEV Moto3, will be allowed to start in Moto3 in 2015. The Frenchman is currently 15, and does not turn 16 until 20th April. If this rule had not been changed, then Quartararo would have been forced to miss the first two races of the 2015 season. The official justification for the rule change is that the CEV is now a championship run under the auspices of the FIM, and therefore has a higher status than a normal national championship. The level in that championship is clearly high, as demonstrated by the results of Jorge Navarro in Moto3, drafted in to replace Livio Loi.

Brno Set To Continue As MotoGP Venue For 2015 And Beyond

MotoGP looks certain to be returning to the Brno circuit for 2015, after the local region of South Moravia guaranteed financing for the race for next year. In addition, talks are continuing to extend financing for the race beyond the 2015 season.

The race in Brno had been in doubt for some time now. The circuit, owned by Karel Abraham Sr, father of Cardion AB rider, has struggled to pay the sanctioning fee demanded by Dorna, despite being the best-attended round of the series (over 142,000 turned up to watch the race in 2013 at the spacious, wooded Czech circuit). The circuit has previously received funding from the Czech government, but that has been withdrawn.

Now, the South Moravian region has stepped in to guarantee the 2.5 million euro sanctioning fee. The event reportedly generates around 35 million euros in revenue for businesses in the area, and is an important contributor to the local economy. Keeping the MotoGP round at the circuit is key for the regional authorities.

The deal agreed guarantees funding for the 2015 round, but talks will continue for future races. Both Dorna and the circuit intend to sign a long-term deal to keep the race at the track.

Below is the press release issued by Dorna explaining the situation:


Brno closing in on fresh MotoGP™ race deal

The legendary Brno Circuit is set to remain on the MotoGP™ calendar for the coming years following negotiations between Dorna Sports, commercial rights holder of the FIM MotoGP World Championship, and officials at the venue this weekend.

The Czech event was first part of the series in 1965, while racing on the modern-day circuit took place from 1987. As MotoGP gathered at Brno for this year’s bwin Grand Prix České republiky, officials looked to secure the immediate future of the event. Dorna CEO Carmelo Ezpeleta met with Mr.Stanislav Juranek, Vice-governor of the South Moravian Region and Mrs. Ivana Ulmanova, CEO Brno Circuit, concluding that funding will soon be in place for at least the 2015 race.

Carmelo Ezpeleta, CEO of Dorna Sports, declared: “I appreciate the decision of The Council of South Moravian Region and personal initiative of the South Moravian governor Mr. Michal Hasek to guarantee funding of the Czech Grand Prix in 2015. I must express my thanks to the vice-governor of the South Moravian Region, Mr. Stanislav Juranek, who informed me about the decision made by the Council. We also discussed the principle of securing the guarantee. The positive information I have received this weekend comes in complete contrast to the information we had received at Sachsenring and therefore completely changes the situation. I consider it to be very positive; it will now be necessary to discuss further steps with the Brno Circuit and with other partners. I cannot predict our final decision at this very moment, but I can assure all MotoGP fans and visitors to the Czech Grand Prix that our primary interest is to keep the MotoGP race in Brno as one of the traditional and highly appreciated events on the World Championship calendar. Further negotiations with regards to firm details of the co-operation with the South Moravian region will be held after the South Moravian assembly, which must approve the decision of the Council. We expect this to happen in the second half of September.”

Mrs. Ivana Ulmanova, CEO, Brno Circuit commented: “I highly appreciate Mr. Ezpeleta’s willingness to meet representatives of the South Moravian Region and accept their guarantee of the MotoGP race at the Brno Circuit. The previous statement we made to Dorna was influenced by the current uncertainty about funding a MotoGP race for 2015. I must express my thanks to Carmelo Ezpeleta for waiting on a final decision about the Czech GP until almost the last possible day. This gives us enough time to negotiate and finally to find a solution. We now have renewed positivity that we can guarantee next year’s MotoGP race. I hope that the effort we spend in keeping live the tradition of the Czech Grand Prix event will be the best evidence for Dorna Sports representatives that we are prepared to stay in the World Championship as a one of the best organised and most popular MotoGP events.”

MotoGP looks certain to be returning to the Brno circuit for 2015, after the local region of South Moravia guaranteed financing for the race for next year. In addition, talks are continuing to extend financing for the race beyond the 2015 season.The race in Brno had been in doubt for some time now. The circuit, owned by Karel Abraham Sr, father of Cardion AB rider, has struggled to pay the sanctioning fee demanded by Dorna, despite being the best-attended round of the series (over 142,000 turned up to watch the race in 2013 at the spacious, wooded Czech circuit). The circuit has previously received funding from the Czech government, but that has been withdrawn.Now, the South Moravian region has stepped in to guarantee the 2.5 million euro sanctioning fee. The event reportedly generates around 35 million euros in revenue for businesses in the area, and is an important contributor to the local economy. Keeping the MotoGP round at the circuit is key for the regional authorities.The deal agreed guarantees funding for the 2015 round, but talks will continue for future races. Both Dorna and the circuit intend to sign a long-term deal to keep the race at the track.Below is the press release issued by Dorna explaining the situation:Brno closing in on fresh MotoGP™ race deal

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