Aleix Espargaro

2014 Phillip Island Sunday Round Up: Why The MotoGP Race Was Not A Tire Fiasco, And Rossi Reaps Rewards

Once again, a MotoGP race at Phillip Island is decided by tires. The tires Bridgestone brought to the Australian circuit were not up to the task, with riders crashing out all throughout the race. The front tires Bridgestone brought to the track were unable to cope with the conditions. The result was determined by tires, not by talent.

That, at least, is the narrative being heard around the internet after the bizarre yet fascinating MotoGP race at Phillip Island. It is an attractive narrative – a nice, simple explanation for what happened in Australia – but it is fundamentally flawed. The tire situation was complicated, certainly. Jorge Lorenzo's front tire showed very severe degradation, more than would normally be explained by the expect wear. Several riders crashed out on the asymmetric front tire Bridgestone brought. But to lay the blame entirely on Bridgestone is quite wrong.

The problems at Phillip Island are inherent to the track, and were exacerbated by changes made to suit European TV schedules. Phillip Island, like Assen, is a track which places peculiar demands on tires. It features a lot of very fast left-hand corners, with only a few right handers, two of which are the slowest corners on the track. It is located next to the Bass Strait, a freezing stretch of water connected to the globe-spanning Southern Ocean, which means the weather is highly changeable. Temperatures dropped during the race by as much as 9°C, probably a result of Dorna insisting on running the race at 4pm local time (the late afternoon) to hit a 7am TV slot in their main markets of Spain and Italy. That time will draw a bigger audience than the 5am slot a 2pm race start would fill. But to locals, racing at 4pm at this time of the year is madness.

2014 Phillip Island MotoGP Sunday Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after an incident-packed Australian Grand Prix at Phillip Island:

Round Number: 
16
Year: 
2014

Scott Jones On The Island: Saturday Photos From Australia


Free of pressure, and fast as ever


There's nothing quite like a 99 by the seaside


Cal Crutchlow has finally figured the Ducati out: ride it like you stole it

2014 Phillip Island MotoGP Saturday Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after qualifying at Phillip Island:

Round Number: 
16
Year: 
2014

2014 Phillip Island MotoGP Friday Round Up - Special Tires For A Special Circuit, And The Rules For 2016

Phillip Island is a very special race track. That has an upside – it rewards courage and talent, and has provided some spectacular racing – but it is also special in the more pejoratively euphemistic sense of the word. It challenges not just the riders, but motorcycle designers and racing teams as well. Above all, it challenges tire manufacturers: with wildly varying temperatures, strong winds blowing in cool and damp air off the ocean, an abrasive surface, high-speed corners, more left handers than right handers, and the most of the lefts faster than the rights. It can rain, be bitterly cold, be bathed in glorious sunshine, or in sweltering heat. Try building a tire to cope with all that.

After last year's fiasco, both Dunlop and Bridgestone tried to do just that. They came to the track in March to test tires and gather data to build tires for this weekend. The only minor problem is that the test came at the end of Australia's long summer, and temperatures were much more congenial than now, as the country emerges from its Antipodean winter. The tire selections brought by Dunlop and Bridgestone are much better than last year, but they are not quite perfect. At any other track, that wouldn't be a problem. At Phillip Island, even being not quite perfect can land you in trouble.

That tires are an issue was evident from the number of riders who crashed, both in MotoGP and in Moto2. Most crashed in right handers, a lot going down at MG, which would be one of the most difficult corners of the year wherever it was located, but a fair few followed suit at Hayshed, the right hander that follows on from Siberia (the most aptly named corner on the calendar) and precedes Lukey Heights. There were crashes at the Honda hairpin as well, the other right hander, where hard braking is at a premium.

2014 Phillip Island MotoGP Friday Post-Practice Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after the first day of practice at Phillip Island:

Round Number: 
16
Year: 
2014

2014 Phillip Island MotoGP Press Release Previews

Press releases from the MotoGP teams ahead of this weekend's Australian Grand Prix at Phillip Island:

Round Number: 
16
Year: 
2014

2014 Motegi MotoGP Sunday Post-Race Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after the Sunday's Japanese round at Motegi:

Round Number: 
15
Year: 
2014

2014 Motegi MotoGP Saturday Post-Qualifying Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after a thrilling qualifying session on Saturday at Motegi:

Round Number: 
15
Year: 
2014

2014 Motegi MotoGP Friday Post-Practice Press Releases

Press releases from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone after the first day of practice at Motegi:

Round Number: 
15
Year: 
2014

2014 Motegi MotoGP Preview Press Releases

Press release previews of this weekend's Japanese Grand Prix at Motegi from the MotoGP teams and Bridgestone:

Round Number: 
15
Year: 
2014

UPDATED - The 2015 MotoGP Rider Line Up So Far - 2 Seats Left To Fill

With MotoGP's silly season for 2015 nearing its conclusion, we can draw up a list of contracts signed for next year and beyond. Below is who is going where for 2015, along with what they will be riding and how long their contracts are for:

Suzuki Press Release: Q&A With Davide Brivio After Suzuki's MotoGP Team Announcement

After the official announcement that Suzuki will be returning to MotoGP, made at the Intermot in Cologne today, the Suzuki press office issued the following press release, containing a question and answer session with Suzuki MotoGP team boss Davide Brivio:


FIVE MINUTES WITH SUZUKI MOTOGP'S DAVIDE BRIVIO

Team Suzuki Press Office – September 30.

Suzuki has unveiled its plans for MotoGP at the Intermot show in Cologne, Germany today, where its 2015 model line-up was revealed to the world’s press.

The Japanese firm has been absent from the Blue Riband race series since 2012, but is back with an all-new bike, a new Team Manager in Davide Brivio and two new riders: Aleix Espargaro and Maverick Vinales.

We spoke to David Brivio at Cologne and asked him about his involvement with the new project.

How long have you been working with the Suzuki MotoGP team?

“Since the beginning, in April 2013 I joined Suzuki and carried on the preparation.”

Year: 
2014

Confirmed At Last: Suzuki To Race In MotoGP From 2015 With Maverick Viñales And Aleix Espargaro

Suzuki have revealed yet another of MotoGP's worst-kept secrets (and the competition has been tough for that claim this year) at the Intermot motorcycle show in Cologne, Germany, officially confirming that they will be returning to MotoGP from next season, after an absence of three seasons. Suzuki team boss Davide Brivio unveiled the latest version of Suzuki's MotoGP bike - now dubbed GSX-RR - and announced that Aleix Espargaro and Maverick Viñales will race for the team. At the same time, Suzuki also confirmed that Randy De Puniet will race as a wildcard on the bike at the final MotoGP round of the season at Valencia.

The official announcement had been a long time coming, despite the riders and team being an open secret. The wait had been down to a request from Suzuki headquarters at Japan, who had wanted to combine the team launch with the launch of Suzuki's 2015 road bike line up at the Intermot show. The presence of senior Suzuki staff at the launch was seen by the team as a powerful display of support by the Japanese factory.

2014 Aragon MotoGP Sunday Round Up: Smart Heads vs Risky Manevuers For The Win.

What a difference a day makes. "There is no way to fight with the factory Hondas," Valentino Rossi had said on Saturday. Within a few laps of the start, it turned out that it was not just possible to fight with the Hondas, but to get them in over their heads, and struggling to hold off the Yamaha onslaught. By the time the checkered flag dropped, the factory Hondas were gone, the first RC213V across the line the LCR of Stefan Bradl, nearly twelve seconds behind the winner, Jorge Lorenzo on the factory M1.

What changed? The weather. Cooler temperatures at the start of the race meant the Hondas struggled to get the hard rear tire to work. The hard rear was never an option for the Yamahas, but the softer rear was still working just fine. From the start, Jorge Lorenzo, Valentino Rossi and the surprising Pol Espargaro were pushing the factory Hondas hard. All of a sudden we had a race on our hands. When the rain came, the excitement stepped up another notch. In the end, strategy and the ability to keep a cool head prevailed. The factory Hondas came up short on both accounts at Aragon.

The forecast for Sunday had been unstable all weekend. But conditions on Sunday morning were far worse than anyone had predicted. Heavy rain soaked the track, then thick fog blanketed the track in a cloak of gray, severely limiting vision at key points on the track. More importantly, the fog kept the medical helicopters on the ground. Without medical helicopters, there's no racing. Should a rider be seriously injured, the helicopters need to be able to get them to a hospital within 20 minutes. When the fog descends, that becomes impossible.

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